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Re: crunch and curl

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  • michalginter@volny.cz
    Crunch is zkracovacka . Not sure about the exact equivalent of curl but sklapovacka should be close enough. The difference between the two is that when
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 3, 2001
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      Crunch is "zkracovacka".

      Not sure about the exact equivalent of "curl" but "sklapovacka" should
      be close enough.

      The difference between the two is that when you do a crunch, you
      lie on your back, and raise your head while contracting your
      abdominal muscles. When you do a "sklapovacka," you move your whole
      upper body, starting at approximately 90 degrees and moving toward your
      legs.

      Hyperextension is not an abdominal exercise. It's usually done on a
      slightly intimidating two-piece contraption; you lie, face down, resting
      your lower belly on one pice, and hook your legs under the other piece.
      You'll start by bending your head and upper body down, and then basically
      streighten up. The purpose is to strengthen the muscles around your small back.

      Michal, the Dumb Jock :-)
      Message: 16
      Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2001 20:03:32 -0000
      From: otto@...
      Subject: TERM: Crunch and curl

      Dear listmates,

      Does anyone know how to say in Czech:

      abdomen crunch (sklapovacka?)

      and

      curl (hyperextenze?)

      or am I completely wrong?

      TIA

      Otto



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      Message: 17
      Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 14:50:44 -0500
      From: Michael Grant <mgrant@...>
      Subject: Re: ABBREVIATION: VOS

      >I don't want to make it a big deal - it isn't, but I don't have a clue
      what
      >"stakeholders" at the top of the chart mean either. Just if it
      rings a bell
      >to you, let me know. Please, don't spend your precious time searching
      your
      >resources.

      "Stakeholders" is a word whose meaning comprises the various groups

      listed in that column: customers, employees, shareholders, and the
      community (plus suppliers, lenders, etc.)--i.e. anyone who has a
      "stake" in a business.

      Sorry, I can't make anything of "VOS".

      Michael

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      Message: 18
      Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 22:11:44 +0200
      From: "Simon Vaughan" <rachelandsimon@...>
      Subject: Re: TERMS: stredni odborna skola/ stredni odborne uciliste

      > I should think the former has more academic curricula (more convenient
      > for those who want to go on by taking a higher education course as
      > opposed to looking for a job right after finishing this one) while the
      > students at the latter type of school get more hands-on training (they
      > have a chance to achieve the same level of certificate as at the former
      > type in most cases these days).

      Useful stuff, Jirka. Thanks.

      On the basis of the advice you, Michael and Coilin have given me, I think
      I'll pencil in the following translations:

      vyssi odborna skola - Higher Vocational School
      stredni odborna skola - Secondary Vocational School
      stredni odborne uciliste - Secondary Vocational College

      Paradoxically, although it can refer to an institution higher up in the
      education system than a school, 'college' can also sound less academic
      than 'school'. To my British ears, anyway.

      Simon





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      Message: 19
      Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 15:12:12 -0500
      From: Michael Grant <mgrant@...>
      Subject: Re: TERM: Crunch and curl

      >curl (hyperextenze?)
      >
      >or am I completely wrong?

      This is definitely wrong--a curl is a contraction/flexion, not an extension.
      Michael

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      Message: 20
      Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2001 22:20:47 -0000
      From: "Jiri Pelka" <jpelka@...>
      Subject: Re: Grass

      Hi all,

      the advice by Rachel to look at Google with Latin name was excellent
      (simplicity is, again & again, beautiful).

      Just tried once, and voila - I got this

      Quackgrass (Agropyron repens)
      (a.k.a. Elytrigia repens)

      Jiri (a.k.a. happy camper today - just cleaned my computer with
      another kind advice by Matej Klimes)





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      Message: 21
      Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2001 22:23:09 -0000
      From: "Jiri Pelka" <jpelka@...>
      Subject: Re: Deutsch

      Again, dear folks,

      sorry for troubles - I have just cleaned my computer with the help of
      Matej Klimes' advice.

      Jiri



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      Message: 22
      Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 18:24:23 EDT
      From: JPKIRCHNER@...
      Subject: Re: Bullet-point conventions

      Simon, you're getting us into a big can of worms. The answer to all your
      questions is either "yes" or "no" depending on which
      styleguide you use.

      In a message dated 8/2/01 4:00:30 PM, rachelandsimon@...
      writes:

      >1. At the beginning of a bullet point, should:
      >
      >a) any initial article be omitted, if the bullet point doesn't follow on
      >from the sentence above;

      Use your native-speaker instincts to decide whether the article belongs there

      or not. Sometimes it does, and sometimes it doesn't, but there's no rule.

      >b) the first letter of the first word be capitalized?

      If each bullet point is a sentence, yes. If it is an independent list, but
      does not contain sentences, probably. If each bullet point is a fragment
      proceeding from an incomplete sentence in the copy above it, no.

      >2. At the end of a bullet point, should there be any punctuation (e.g.
      >a semi-colon)?

      As a rule, you should put the same punctuation after each item as you would
      in a series, including a period at the end of the last one, if it ends a
      sentence. If the list is independent of any sentence, though, I would not
      punctuate them on the end at all, unless each item is a self-contained
      sentence.

      A lot of this also depends on what structure precedes the list. If you get a

      full sentence that ends with a colon, for example, "We bought the following

      items:", then I would treat the bullet points as independent of the
      sentence,
      initial-cap them, and use no punctuation. If the list is preceded by
      something like, "We bought:", I would use the same capitalization and

      punctuation rules as I would for a series within a sentence.

      But, again, this is all highly variable, and you can find at least one style

      manual to support almost anything you want to do.


      Jamie


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      Message: 23
      Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2001 18:34:56 EDT
      From: JPKIRCHNER@...
      Subject: Re: TERMS: stredni odborna skola/ stredni odborne uciliste


      In a message dated 8/2/01 4:16:14 PM, rachelandsimon@...
      writes:

      >vyssi odborna skola - Higher Vocational School
      >stredni odborna skola - Secondary Vocational School
      >stredni odborne uciliste - Secondary Vocational College

      >Paradoxically, although it can refer to an institution higher up in the
      >education system than a school, 'college' can also sound less academic
      >than 'school'. To my British ears, anyway.

      To North American ears it would convey post-secondary education. A college
      is a university in North America, so that translation doesn't work.

      BUT! I've pulled out a set of charts from the Czech ministry of education
      that lists the official translations of most of these terms. (I got it from

      Michael for a job I did for him while he was still in Prague.) Here's what
      the "official" charts say:

      >stredni odborna skola - Secondary Technical School
      >stredni odborne uciliste - Secondary Vocational School

      Unfortunately, it doesn't provide a translation of "vyssi odborna
      skola", and
      it gives that awful Czenglish term "basic school" for "zakladni
      skola". I
      also don't like "creche" for nursery school, but that's my own
      geographic
      prejudice. But at least the charts don't call "gymnazium" a
      "secondary
      grammar school", as most Czechs seem to.

      Jamie


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      Message: 24
      Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2001 22:39:05 -0000
      From: "Jiri Pelka" <jpelka@...>
      Subject: Re: TERM: Zakladni umelecka skola

      Hi Simon,

      I like your suggestion "the Primary Arts School" (PAS) as it suggests

      quite right that

      - PAS does belong to the state education system and is supported by
      taxpayers (you pay peanuts for tution)

      - PAS leads directly (provided you are good at what you are doing) to
      the secondary arts education, i.e. to "konzervator/concervatory"
      with "maturita - HSLE", and then (if you are really exceelent) to
      tertiary arts education, i.e. "Academy of (music, theatrical, film,
      etc.) Arts".

      Jiri





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      Message: 25
      Date: Thu, 02 Aug 2001 23:08:06 -0000
      From: zehrovak@...
      Subject: Re: Stakeholders

      Jirka B. wrote:
      > I don't have a
      clue what "stakeholders" at the top of the chart mean either.

      I have seen 'stakeholder theory' translated as 'teorie
      zainteresovanych' and 'stakeholder' in its most general sense
      translated as 'zainteresovany ucastnik' - elsewhere 'podilnik'.


      M.



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    • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
      ... I don t think curls are an abdominal exercise. Curls are an exercise for the biceps, where you start with your arms hanging, palms forward, holding the
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 3, 2001
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        In a message dated 8/3/01 9:12:38 AM, michalginter@... writes:

        >Not sure about the exact equivalent of "curl" but "sklapovacka" should
        >be close enough.
        >
        >The difference between the two is that when you do a crunch, you
        >lie on your back, and raise your head while contracting your
        >abdominal muscles. When you do a "sklapovacka," you move your whole
        >upper body, starting at approximately 90 degrees and moving toward your
        >legs.

        I don't think curls are an abdominal exercise. Curls are an exercise for the
        biceps, where you start with your arms hanging, palms forward, holding the
        barbell or the dumbells, and you curl your arm upward toward your chest or
        shoulders. Unless there is such a thing as an abdominal curl, then this
        biceps exercise is definitely what curls are.

        Jamie
      • Michael Grant
        ... That sounds like a sit-up, not a curl. A basic curl is an arm movement: lifting a dumbbell or barbells by contracting the biceps and bending the elbows.
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 3, 2001
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          >Not sure about the exact equivalent of "curl" but "sklapovacka" should
          >be close enough.
          >
          >The difference between the two is that when you do a crunch, you
          >lie on your back, and raise your head while contracting your
          >abdominal muscles. When you do a "sklapovacka," you move your whole
          >upper body, starting at approximately 90 degrees and moving toward your
          >legs.

          That sounds like a sit-up, not a curl. A basic curl is an arm
          movement: lifting a dumbbell or barbells by contracting the biceps
          and bending the elbows. You can also do leg curls, but AFAIK there's
          no such thing as an abdominal curl.

          "Iron" Michael

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