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TERM: activace

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Dear listmates, as usual, I m doing a Czech-to-English translation and I have this word aktivace in the accounting sense. Aliberto Caforio s dictionary gives
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 30, 2001
      Dear listmates,

      as usual, I'm doing a Czech-to-English translation and I have this word
      "aktivace" in the accounting sense. Aliberto Caforio's dictionary gives
      <activation> and <capitalisation>, but I mostly want to ask about the word
      from Robert Mladek's book, Svetove ucenictvi, which is <revenuisation>. The
      word sounds OK, however, should I rely on my World Wide Web search, I would
      say that Robert Mladek is the only person using the word; that's fishy. Is
      that the wrong spelling (quite likely in that book) or is the word utter
      trash? What do you recommend to use? The document is a small company's (30
      people) guideline about financial planning and the word is used in the name
      of a planning item meaning valuation (basically cost accounting) of the
      company's finished products.

      Jirka Bolech
    • Michael Grant
      ... Well, expenditures that are aktivierungsfähig in German are inventoriable in English. It s the same concept, but I don t know if the verb or verbal
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 30, 2001
        >as usual, I'm doing a Czech-to-English translation and I have this word
        >"aktivace" in the accounting sense. Aliberto Caforio's dictionary gives
        ><activation> and <capitalisation>, but I mostly want to ask about the word
        >from Robert Mladek's book, Svetove ucenictvi, which is <revenuisation>. The
        >word sounds OK, however, should I rely on my World Wide Web search, I would
        >say that Robert Mladek is the only person using the word; that's fishy. Is
        >that the wrong spelling (quite likely in that book) or is the word utter
        >trash? What do you recommend to use? The document is a small company's (30
        >people) guideline about financial planning and the word is used in the name
        >of a planning item meaning valuation (basically cost accounting) of the
        >company's finished products.

        Well, expenditures that are "aktivierungsfähig" in German are
        "inventoriable" in English. It's the same concept, but I don't know
        if the verb or verbal noun forms are used. If I'm not mistaken, at
        least in Czech practice the term is associated with internally
        manufactured production assets as opposed to goods manufactured for
        sale.

        Michael

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      • Zdenek Mikan
        Can anybody explain this term? The context is: In my position I have a catbird seat on new and emerging technologies. Thanks in advance. Zdenek Mikan
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 1, 2001
          Can anybody explain this term? The context is:

          In my position I have a catbird seat on new and emerging technologies.

          Thanks in advance.

          Zdenek Mikan
        • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
          ... To be in the catbird seat means that you are in top position, looking far down on all your competitors. There s a sense that no one is even close to being
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 1, 2001
            In a message dated 8/1/01 6:19:35 AM, zdenek@... writes:

            >In my position I have a catbird seat on new and emerging technologies.

            To be in the catbird seat means that you are in top position, looking far
            down on all your competitors. There's a sense that no one is even close to
            being able to compete with you effectively, and there's also a sense that you
            are relaxed and contented in that advantageous position.

            Jamie
          • Simon Vaughan
            ... Just to give you a sense of why the phrase means what it does, I am ... The catbird (scientific name: dumetella carolinensis) is relatively common in the
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 1, 2001
              > >In my position I have a catbird seat on new and emerging technologies.
              >
              > To be in the catbird seat means that you are in top position, looking
              > far down on all your competitors. There's a sense that no one is even
              > close to being able to compete with you effectively, and there's also
              > a sense that you are relaxed and contented in that advantageous
              > position.

              Just to give you a sense of why the phrase means what it does, I am
              reproducing this e-mail (by one Bob), which I found on the Net:

              ---
              The catbird (scientific name: dumetella carolinensis) is relatively common
              in the the southern U.S., a dark gray bird with a black cap. It is related
              to the mockingbird, and is aggressively territorial, driven by instinct to
              secure a place at the top of the tallest tree in its territory. From
              there, it can scout out all invaders. The dictionaries list the earliest
              usage of "sittin' in the catbird seat" as 1942, but I can go one further
              and tell you that it was popularized by the late Red Barber, the great
              baseball announcer, raconteur, and Southern gentleman. He may or may not
              have originated it, but the phrase wll be forever associated with him.
              ---

              Simon
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