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Re: TERM: hop on/hop off

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  • Simon Vollam
    ... minutes ... are ... on/hop ... Yes, the so-clause describes the system. Hop on/hop off emphasises its convenience compared with the more usual (and more
    Message 1 of 4 , May 14, 2001
      --- In Czechlist@y..., Jirka Bolech <jirka.bolech@s...> wrote:
      > Hi there,
      >
      > the following is from a British textbook: "Buses depart every 10
      minutes
      > and operate on a hop on/hop off system, so you buy your ticket and
      are
      > free to use the buses all day." Could somebody confirm that <hop
      on/hop
      > off> here refers to what the so-clause above describes? Is there
      > anything else interesting to mention about the expression?
      >
      > Jirka Bolech

      Yes, the so-clause describes the system. "Hop on/hop off" emphasises
      its convenience compared with the more usual (and more silly) British
      system of paying the driver a fare for each ride (which means that
      the bus stands for ages at each stop while everyone fumbles in their
      pockets/purses for change).

      Simon
    • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
      ... This sillier system you mention is also the American system, I m afraid. Note that hop on/hop off would almost certainly not be understood by North
      Message 2 of 4 , May 14, 2001
        In a message dated 5/14/01 3:32:27 AM, simon.vollam@... writes:

        >Yes, the so-clause describes the system. "Hop on/hop off" emphasises
        >its convenience compared with the more usual (and more silly) British
        >system of paying the driver a fare for each ride (which means that
        >the bus stands for ages at each stop while everyone fumbles in their
        >pockets/purses for change).

        This sillier system you mention is also the American system, I'm afraid.
        Note that "hop on/hop off" would almost certainly not be understood by North
        Americans.

        Jamie
      • Simon Vollam
        ... by North ... I m not sure it s that well understood in the UK, either, hence the explanatory clause. Simon
        Message 3 of 4 , May 14, 2001
          > Note that "hop on/hop off" would almost certainly not be understood
          by North
          > Americans.
          >
          > Jamie

          I'm not sure it's that well understood in the UK, either, hence the
          explanatory clause.

          Simon
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