Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Bitish and American English

Expand Messages
  • Melvyn Clarke
    Hi Todd, ... conversation, either by email or direct. My feelings about it are mixed: Yes, mailing lists like this involve a weird kind of communication with a
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 3, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Todd,

      >This is the first time I've ever engaged in any kind website or chat room
      conversation, either by email or direct. My feelings about it are mixed:

      Yes, mailing lists like this involve a weird kind of communication with a
      different dynamic to
      private conversations or to most kinds of public speaking IMHO - I'm still
      getting the hang of
      it myself. We have to learn some different habits, right?

      >Just this: no to language hegemony.
      OK

      >a British school director who evidently
      thought that the most obscure British dialect was more legitimate than
      standard North American.

      >So the kids had to listen to various mumblers from
      Manchester,

      Oh dear:) . Right, I've got a bone to pick with you here.

      Just to clarify, could you describe any of the language used by these
      teachers and why you
      consider it dialect and obscure?

      I have a theory. Have you ever heard how Praguers say that Pilsners "sing"
      when they speak
      and how Pilsners say exactly the same about Praguers? In fact,
      they simply have different intonation patterns - it's all relative.

      I wonder if it is possible that your perception of mumbling falls into a
      similar trap. I
      wonder if you are talking, for example, about use of what they call
      laryngealization (or "creak" - that
      sound at the back of the mouth like a stick being run very quickly along
      railings - which you
      find in all varieties of English - but which is used in different ways in
      different regions. Or
      perhaps nasalization. Or a combination of the two. I think that when I meet
      an English speaker from another country, very often it is not the
      pronunciation that gives me problems but the different combination of this
      creak and nasalization which I need a few minutes to attune to. That's my
      theory, anyway.



      When I was taking my TEFL course, our instructor told us of the importance
      of exposing
      students to as many varieties of standard English as possible. I think this
      is very true. In all the schools where I have
      taught they have indeed had a good mix of teachers. A school that has only
      British speakers
      sounds very dodgy indeed.

      >Next time I have a
      trip to Prague, which should be sometime this spring or summer, I would like
      to join as many of you as possible for that Friday night beer!

      OK or how about inviting us down to Valtice?:)

      >By the way, could it be that a village green really is just a British
      >thing?
      Surely not.

      >My idea of a helpful and enjoyable exchange on the topic is finding out
      those funny differences

      Like "rubber"?

      Anyway, I found your comments on official use of the word "monument" very
      useful. Take care.

      Bye,

      Melvyn
      ______________________________________________________
      Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.