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Re: [Czechlist] TERM: barokarsky

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  • Jaroslav Hejzlar
    Hi, Jamie! I have never heard the term BAROKÁRSKÝ in my life and I am not able to find it in the dictionary of the Czech language either. I suppose it could
    Message 1 of 6 , May 3, 2001
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      Hi, Jamie!
      I have never heard the term BAROKÁRSKÝ in my life and I am not able to find it in the dictionary of the Czech language either. I suppose it could mean the same as BAROKIZUJÍCÍ, i.e. imitating the baroque style, but I am not quite sure. If it does, I would try to translate it as "baroque-like" (if it noes not sound too strange to your native ears). With best regards,
      Jarda Hejzlar
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: JPKIRCHNER@...
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, May 04, 2001 6:10 AM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: barokarsky


      How would y'all translate the term "barokar^sky" into English? It applies to
      19th-century glass, and it is apparently different from neo-baroque.

      Jamie

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    • Simon Vollam
      ... applies to ... Mock-Baroque? :-) Simon
      Message 2 of 6 , May 4, 2001
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        --- In Czechlist@y..., JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
        > How would y'all translate the term "barokar^sky" into English? It
        applies to
        > 19th-century glass, and it is apparently different from neo-baroque.
        >
        > Jamie

        Mock-Baroque? :-)

        Simon
      • Rachel Thompson
        ... applies to ... Hi Jamie, My friend who works in the National Gallery wasn t familiar with the term, but suggested that might be synonymous with
        Message 3 of 6 , May 4, 2001
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          > How would y'all translate the term "barokar^sky" into English? It
          applies to
          > 19th-century glass, and it is apparently different from neo-baroque.

          Hi Jamie,

          My friend who works in the National Gallery wasn't familiar with the term,
          but suggested that might be synonymous with pseudobarokni. Would this fit
          the context?

          Here's her message:
          -------
          Barokarsky would mean something only in the context. For example, if
          somebody is interested in baroque period than he/she is called "barokar"
          which mens that he or she is specialised in baroque art, architecture etc.
          But it is not proper Czech, it is only a spoken term.

          Probably it means the same as "pseudobarokni", using the forms of baroque
          but in a different period (19th or 20th centuries)
          --------

          Rachel
        • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
          ... Thanks! I think this does fit the context, however, I somehow have to distinguish it from neo-baroque, which will be a toughy, since what is neo-baroque
          Message 4 of 6 , May 4, 2001
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            In a message dated 5/4/01 10:55:51 AM, rachel.thompson@... writes:

            >My friend who works in the National Gallery wasn't familiar with the term,
            >but suggested that might be synonymous with pseudobarokni. Would this
            >fit the context?

            Thanks! I think this does fit the context, however, I somehow have to
            distinguish it from neo-baroque, which will be a toughy, since what is
            neo-baroque if not a kind of pseudo-baroque? I'm not surprised that this
            term is not spisovny, because the text I am translating is a little on the
            chatty side.

            Much obliged.

            Jamie
          • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
            ... I thought of making it neo-baroque , but lo and behold, the sentence talks about things being both barokarsky AND neo-baroque , or the artist starting
            Message 5 of 6 , May 5, 2001
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              In a message dated 5/5/01 2:29:08 AM, hejzlar@... writes:

              >I have never heard the term BAROKÁRSKY in my life and I am not able to
              >find it in the dictionary of the Czech language either. I suppose it could
              >mean the same as BAROKIZUJÍCÍ, i.e. imitating the baroque style, but I
              >am not quite sure. If it does, I would try to translate it as "baroque-like"
              >(if it noes not sound too strange to your native ears).

              I thought of making it "neo-baroque", but lo and behold, the sentence talks
              about things being both "barokarsky" AND "neo-baroque", or the artist
              starting out as barokarsky but also learning the neo-baroque style.
              Occasionally, this author writes things that don't make a lot of sense. For
              example, I've run into a "jeho" or two that could refer to either one of two
              people in the same paragraph.

              Thanks very much.

              Jamie
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