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TERM: vyrizovat

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  • miriam cekalova
    Dear translators, I have recently read the discussion on Czechlist concerning incorrect English signs in metro. I remember that it was the phrase The train is
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 30, 2001
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      Dear translators,
      I have recently read the discussion on Czechlist concerning incorrect
      English signs in metro. I remember that it was the phrase 'The train is
      coming to the station' that was most criticized by native speakers from
      Czechlist. When the right translation was found, one girl contacted the
      relevant authorities in order to give them the right translation. At that
      time I took it for granted that the phrase would be changed. Last week,
      however, I traveled by metro and, to my big surprice, I saw the old
      incorrect phrase on the screen. It seems that the relevant authorities
      either do not take the criticism of native speakers seriously, or the change
      of the sign would be so complicated that they decided not to do it. Any idea
      what we could do about it?
      I have one more question. One of my duties at work is translating
      commercial correspondence. In business letters I often come across the word
      'vyrizuje' (+ name) which designates the person who is in charge of
      arranging the matter in question and who can be contacted by the addressee
      in case he wants to ask about something. Do you have any suggestions how
      could I traslate this verb into English? Thank you in advance. Miriam
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    • Tomás Skøont
      I guess you already answered the question in your message. I would go for person in charge . Regards, Tomas Skront ... From: miriam cekalova
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 30, 2001
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        I guess you already answered the question in your message. I would go for
        "person in charge".

        Regards,

        Tomas Skront
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: miriam cekalova <miriamcekalova@...>
        To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, April 30, 2001 9:18 AM
        Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: vyrizovat


        > Dear translators,
        > I have recently read the discussion on Czechlist concerning incorrect
        > English signs in metro. I remember that it was the phrase 'The train is
        > coming to the station' that was most criticized by native speakers from
        > Czechlist. When the right translation was found, one girl contacted the
        > relevant authorities in order to give them the right translation. At that
        > time I took it for granted that the phrase would be changed. Last week,
        > however, I traveled by metro and, to my big surprice, I saw the old
        > incorrect phrase on the screen. It seems that the relevant authorities
        > either do not take the criticism of native speakers seriously, or the
        change
        > of the sign would be so complicated that they decided not to do it. Any
        idea
        > what we could do about it?
        > I have one more question. One of my duties at work is translating
        > commercial correspondence. In business letters I often come across the
        word
        > 'vyrizuje' (+ name) which designates the person who is in charge of
        > arranging the matter in question and who can be contacted by the addressee
        > in case he wants to ask about something. Do you have any suggestions how
        > could I traslate this verb into English? Thank you in advance. Miriam
        > _________________________________________________________________________
        > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Czechlist: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
        > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • Simon Vollam
        ... name) Do you have any suggestions how could I traslate this verb into English? ... Me too, or contact person perhaps. If you are desperate to use a verb,
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 30, 2001
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          > From: miriam cekalova <miriamcekalova@h...>

          > > In business letters I often come across the word 'vyrizuje' (+
          name) Do you have any suggestions how could I traslate this verb into
          English?

          > --- In Czechlist@y..., Tomás Skøont <skront@m...> wrote:
          > I would go for "person in charge".
          >
          > Tomas Skront

          Me too, or "contact person" perhaps. If you are desperate to use a
          verb, you could try "deal with", "take care of" or "attend to", for
          example. But don't be afraid of "rewriting" the original. Semantic
          translation of letters usually produces disastrous results, as Czech
          correspondence style is very different to English.

          Simon
        • Tony Long
          My British bank, TSB Lloyds, used Contact person: at bottom left below the signature in their last, quite formal, reply to an enquiry. Tony ... Od: Kostas
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 30, 2001
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            My British bank, TSB Lloyds, used 'Contact person:' at bottom left below the
            signature in their last, quite formal, reply to an enquiry.

            Tony
            -----Pùvodní zpráva-----
            Od: Kostas Zgafas <kzgafas@...>
            Komu: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
            Datum: 30. dubna 2001 10:44
            Pøedmìt: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: vyrizovat


            >> I have one more question. One of my duties at work is translating
            >> commercial correspondence. In business letters I often come across the
            >word
            >> 'vyrizuje' (+ name) which designates the person who is in charge of
            >> arranging the matter in question and who can be contacted by the
            addressee
            >> in case he wants to ask about something. Do you have any suggestions how
            >> could I traslate this verb into English? Thank you in advance. Miriam
            >
            >In charge:
            >or
            >Responsible person:
            >
            >K.
            >
            >
            >
            >Czechlist: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
            >Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • Simon Vaughan
            Hi Miriam, ... of native speakers seriously, or the change of the sign would be so complicated that they decided not to do it. Any idea what we could do about
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 30, 2001
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              Hi Miriam,

              > It seems that the relevant authorities either do not take the criticism
              of native speakers seriously, or the change of the sign would be so
              complicated that they decided not to do it. Any idea what we could do
              about it?

              Let's start a petition -- do you think 150 signatures of Czechlist members
              would convince them to take action?

              > In business letters I often come across the word 'vyrizuje' (+ name)
              which designates the person who is in charge of arranging the matter in
              question and who can be contacted by the addressee in case he wants to ask
              about something. Do you have any suggestions how could I traslate this
              verb into English?

              We never resolved this to our satisfaction, did we? Of the suggestions
              put forward this morning, I like Simon's "contact person" best. This
              could be shortened to "contact". I don't think "person in charge" is a
              particularly good solution, because usually the person is not in charge
              but rather represents the person who is (all that he is in charge of is
              the paperwork, as far as I can tell). "Officer in charge" sounds a little
              pompous to me.

              Simon
            • Michael Grant
              ... How about contact person or just contact ? Michael -- BLUE DANUBE international communication services The Central and East European Language Source!
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 30, 2001
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                >I have one more question. One of my duties at work is translating
                >commercial correspondence. In business letters I often come across the word
                >'vyrizuje' (+ name) which designates the person who is in charge of
                >arranging the matter in question and who can be contacted by the addressee
                >in case he wants to ask about something. Do you have any suggestions how
                >could I traslate this verb into English? Thank you in advance. Miriam

                How about "contact person" or just "contact"?
                Michael
                --
                BLUE DANUBE international communication services
                The Central and East European Language Source!
                <http://www.bdanube.com>, <mailto:bdanube@...>
                Tel. (+1-512) 336-8911, Fax (+1-512) 336-8954
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