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schcawtish (was schmockney)

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  • Simon Vaughan
    ... We could maybe make a distinction here between Scottish English (basically standard English spoken with a Scottish accent and sprinkled with a few
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 4 12:27 AM
      > > If Scottish is a separate language,
      >
      > I have never met a Scot who claimed Scottish English is a separate
      > language. Have you?

      We could maybe make a distinction here between Scottish English (basically
      standard English spoken with a Scottish accent and sprinkled with a few
      typically Scottish expressions) and Scots (a full-blooded
      dialect/language, an offshoot of Old English and scarcely intelligible to
      the Sassenach, which differs from standard English in grammar as well as
      vocabulary). The latter, arguably, is as distinct from English as Slovak
      is from Czech, maybe more so.

      Simon
    • zehrovak@dr.com
      ... (basically ... few ... Is Scots ever referred to as Scottish? And BTW do you know what its relationship is with the Lallands of Robert Burns? (a
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 4 4:14 AM
        --- In Czechlist@y..., "Simon Vaughan" <rachelandsimon@q...> wrote:
        > > > If Scottish is a separate language,
        > >
        > > I have never met a Scot who claimed Scottish English is a separate
        > > language. Have you?
        >
        > We could maybe make a distinction here between Scottish English
        (basically
        > standard English spoken with a Scottish accent and sprinkled with a
        few
        > typically Scottish expressions) and Scots

        Is Scots ever referred to as Scottish? And BTW do you know what its
        relationship is with the 'Lallands' of Robert Burns?

        (a full-blooded
        > dialect/language,

        'A language is a dialect plus an army and a navy' says the old saw,
        but I suppose that would also exclude Geordie, Lanky twang (ayup is
        tha goorn to t'pub, chuck?'), Scouse, Yorkshire (tintintin = it isn't
        in the tin) Zomerzet and Estuaryenglishsniff, which hardly seems fair
        somehow.


        an offshoot of Old English and scarcely
        intelligible to
        > the Sassenach, which differs from standard English in grammar as
        well as
        > vocabulary). The latter, arguably, is as distinct from English as
        Slovak
        > is from Czech, maybe more so.


        FWIW I hear that Slovak is closer in grammar and lexis to Czech than
        the northern and southern dialects of German are to each other. I'd
        rate Czech and Slovak as about 99.5% mutually intelligible (I hear
        that younger Czechs have difficulty with one or two Slovak words these
        days) which is a lot higher than Scots, Geordie, Scouse and 'Middle
        English'.

        As for Wyckliffe or Wycliffe or Wyclif, I don't know about any
        standard spelling but those dictionaries I have which mention him give
        the pronunciation as [wiklif]. Never heard a glottal stop in the
        middle. That would make him sound like a sleazy guest house in some
        wasteland southern holiday resort.

        Melvyn
      • Zemedelec@aol.com
        In a message dated 4/4/1 6:24:00, zehrovak@dr.com writes: Reminds me of the newish
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 4 4:33 PM
          In a message dated 4/4/1 6:24:00, zehrovak@... writes:

          << 'A language is a dialect plus an army and a navy' says the old saw >>

          Reminds me of the newish saw, " Superstition is religion without an agenda."
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