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Re: [Czechlist] CHAT: Fraze v metru (was Vlak prijizdi do stanice)

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  • Irena Steinerova
    ... Od: JPKIRCHNER@aol.com Komu: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Datum: 27. bøezna 2001 14:27 Pøedmìt: Re:
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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      -----Pùvodní zpráva-----
      Od: JPKIRCHNER@... <JPKIRCHNER@...>
      Komu: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Datum: 27. bøezna 2001 14:27
      Pøedmìt: Re: [Czechlist] Vlak prijizdi do stanice


      I have seen something like "Forgetting to pay for your ticket will cost you
      dear" in the Prague "metro" - does it sound natural to English native
      speakers?
      I remember seeing "Don't go too far on(?) your fare" in London buses; and
      something like "Obstructing the door will cause delay..." in the London
      Underground, which corresponds to the Czech phrase "Neopirejte se o dvere".
      And "Mind the gap", which I think has no equivalent here. It may be useful
      to collect such phrases, but there must be thousands of them...
      Irena

      >In a message dated 3/27/01 4:41:05 AM, padamek@... writes:
      >
      >>"POZOR - VLAK PRIJIZDI DO
      >>STANICE - ATTENTION - TRAIN IS COMING TO STATION".
      >>Zajimalo by mne, jestli je ta anglictina idiomaticka, jestli by se takovy
      >>napis mohl promitat trebas v londynskem nebo newyorskem metru.
      >
      >It's not idiomatic. I would say "TRAIN ARRIVING AT STATION" OR "TRAIN
      >PULLING IN TO STATION". That "coming to" makes it sound like the train is
      >maybe halfway from the next town.
      >
      >Jamie
      >
      >
      >Czechlist: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
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      >
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      >
      >
    • Simon Vaughan
      ... you ... It is natural, but old-fashioned and inappropriate. It sounds more like moral advice than a warning that, by failing to pay, one risks a hefty
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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        > I have seen something like "Forgetting to pay for your ticket will cost
        you
        > dear" in the Prague "metro" - does it sound natural to English native
        > speakers?

        It is natural, but old-fashioned and inappropriate. It sounds more like
        moral advice than a warning that, by failing to pay, one risks a hefty
        fine.

        Simon
      • Radka Crossley
        If a train is approaching London (or any other big city) sation these days and you still don t have a ticket, you better start worrying. They have all these
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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          If a train is approaching London (or any other big city) sation these
          days and you still don't have a ticket, you better start worrying.
          They have all these inspectors circling all exits and checking
          passengers' tickets in an "attempt to clamp down on fare dodgers"
          (quoting a certain newsreader). So no more free rides to Manchester
          for me...

          Radka
        • zehrovak@dr.com
          ... cost ... native ... like ... hefty ... I d agree that it is old-fashioned and it does sound rather melodramatic to me - something like to se Vam vymsti
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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            --- In Czechlist@y..., "Simon Vaughan" <rachelandsimon@q...> wrote:
            > > I have seen something like "Forgetting to pay for your ticket will
            cost
            > you
            > > dear" in the Prague "metro" - does it sound natural to English
            native
            > > speakers?
            >
            > It is natural, but old-fashioned and inappropriate. It sounds more
            like
            > moral advice than a warning that, by failing to pay, one risks a
            hefty
            > fine.
            >
            > Simon

            I'd agree that it is old-fashioned and it does sound rather
            melodramatic to me - something like 'to se Vam vymsti' perhaps?

            M.
          • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
            ... This wording doesn t sound unnatural to me, but it does seem unnatural to me for it to be on a sign in the subway. So, it s not the wording that s odd to
            Message 5 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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              In a message dated 3/27/01 10:05:24 AM, irena.steinerova@... writes:

              >I have seen something like "Forgetting to pay for your ticket will cost
              >you dear" in the Prague "metro" - does it sound natural to English native
              >speakers?

              This wording doesn't sound unnatural to me, but it does seem unnatural to me
              for it to be on a sign in the subway. So, it's not the wording that's odd to
              me, but the physical context.

              >And "Mind the gap", which I think has no equivalent here.

              Not here either. What does it mean? It sounds like some obscure advice a
              Zen monk would give!

              Jamie
            • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
              ... What would we call a fare dodger in the States? A freeloader? I have no idea. Jamie
              Message 6 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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                In a message dated 3/27/01 11:45:28 AM, radski2000@... writes:

                >"attempt to clamp down on fare dodgers"

                What would we call a fare dodger in the States? A freeloader? I have no
                idea.

                Jamie
              • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                ... There was that horrible sign at Muzeum when the station was being repaired in the early 1990s that said, Get out on the Wenzel Square . I was delighted a
                Message 7 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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                  In a message dated 3/27/01 2:55:10 PM, zehrovak@... writes:

                  >I'd agree that it is old-fashioned and it does sound rather
                  >melodramatic to me - something like 'to se Vam vymsti' perhaps?

                  There was that horrible sign at Muzeum when the station was being repaired in
                  the early 1990s that said, "Get out on the Wenzel Square". I was delighted a
                  few days after I first saw it, to see an article in Lidove Noviny titled,
                  "Vypadni na Venclovo namesti!"

                  Jamie
                • Michael Grant
                  ... Speaking of the ol Venclovak, is the sign still there on the Sv. Vaclav monument warning visitors not to climb on the basement ? Michael -- BLUE DANUBE
                  Message 8 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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                    >There was that horrible sign at Muzeum when the station was being repaired in
                    >the early 1990s that said, "Get out on the Wenzel Square". I was delighted a
                    >few days after I first saw it, to see an article in Lidove Noviny titled,
                    >"Vypadni na Venclovo namesti!"

                    Speaking of the ol' Venclovak, is the sign still there on the Sv.
                    Vaclav monument warning visitors not to climb on the "basement"?

                    Michael

                    --
                    BLUE DANUBE international communication services
                    The Central and East European Language Source!
                    <http://www.bdanube.com>, <mailto:bdanube@...>
                    Tel. (+1-512) 336-8911, Fax (+1-512) 336-8954
                  • padamek@mbox.dkm.cz
                    Ja si predstavuji, ze mind the gap se tyka skviry mezi vlakem a nastupistem. My zase mame nevstupujte na bezpecnostni pas , hec^! Petr ... advice a
                    Message 9 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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                      Ja si predstavuji, ze "mind the gap" se tyka skviry mezi vlakem a
                      nastupistem. My zase mame "nevstupujte na bezpecnostni pas", hec^!
                      Petr
                      --- In Czechlist@y..., JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
                      >
                      > >And "Mind the gap", which I think has no equivalent here.
                      >
                      > Not here either. What does it mean? It sounds like some obscure
                      advice a
                      > Zen monk would give!
                      >
                      > Jamie
                    • simon.vollam@cnb.cz
                      Petr is right. Some London Underground stations have curved platforms, which means that when a train comes to the station gaps open up between the carriages
                      Message 10 of 18 , Mar 27, 2001
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                        Petr is right. Some London Underground stations have curved
                        platforms, which means that when a train "comes to the station" gaps
                        open up between the carriages and the platform at certain doors. A
                        recorded voice then announces repeatedly in stentorian, upper-middle-
                        class tones: "MIND ... THE GAP". Then all the non-English speaking
                        tourists fall down the holes.

                        It's one of those anonymously authored phrases that has burrowed its
                        way into the public consciousness. There can't be anyone, at least in
                        the south of England, who doesn't know exactly what it refers to.

                        Simon


                        --- In Czechlist@y..., padamek@m... wrote:
                        > Ja si predstavuji, ze "mind the gap" se tyka skviry mezi vlakem a
                        > nastupistem. My zase mame "nevstupujte na bezpecnostni pas", hec^!
                        > Petr
                        > --- In Czechlist@y..., JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
                        > >
                        > > >And "Mind the gap", which I think has no equivalent here.
                        > >
                        > > Not here either. What does it mean? It sounds like some obscure
                        > advice a
                        > > Zen monk would give!
                        > >
                        > > Jamie
                      • simon.vollam@cnb.cz
                        ... repaired in ... delighted a ... titled, ... I love these gaffes. One of my favourites was pasta with shrumps and muscles on a menu. And recently here at
                        Message 11 of 18 , Mar 28, 2001
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                          --- In Czechlist@y..., Michael Grant <mgrant@b...> wrote:
                          > >There was that horrible sign at Muzeum when the station was being
                          repaired in
                          > >the early 1990s that said, "Get out on the Wenzel Square". I was
                          delighted a
                          > >few days after I first saw it, to see an article in Lidove Noviny
                          titled,
                          > >"Vypadni na Venclovo namesti!"
                          >
                          > Speaking of the ol' Venclovak, is the sign still there on the Sv.
                          > Vaclav monument warning visitors not to climb on the "basement"?
                          >
                          > Michael
                          >

                          I love these gaffes. One of my favourites was "pasta with shrumps and
                          muscles" on a menu.

                          And recently here at work I reluctantly had to correct a job title
                          "Precious mental reserves management officer". That's the sort of
                          person I need to have around!

                          Oh, and I mustn't forget the "Non-constructive (i.e. nestavebni)
                          investment manager". Mind you, maybe that was intentional.

                          Simon
                        • Zdenek Bobek
                          ... Well, that is a good idea! Americans it is your turn to teach us now. How is cerny pasazer in AmEng? Speaking about those phrases, I remeber one which
                          Message 12 of 18 , Mar 28, 2001
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                            > What would we call a fare dodger in the States? A freeloader? I have no
                            > idea.
                            >
                            > Jamie

                            Well, that is a good idea! Americans it is your turn to teach us now. How is
                            "cerny pasazer" in AmEng?

                            Speaking about those phrases, I remeber one which was not in "krtek" in
                            Prague, it was on a door of a restaurant near "Punkevni jeskyne" here in
                            Moravian Karst. It was in Russian:
                            (Sorry, I cannot use Cyrillic, so I transcript using czech trascription)

                            Pozalujsta, kulturno dvere zakryvat

                            pro ty kteri se neucili rusky:
                            Prosim zavirejte dvere kulturne.

                            For those who did not learn Russian:
                            Please, close the door in cultural way.

                            As the day I saw that there was a large group of tourists from Russia, I
                            could see the staff of the restaurant really had a good reason to glue the
                            paper on the door!

                            Take care (and close the door of pubs in Moravia carefully)

                            :-)

                            Bob
                          • Simon Vaughan
                            ... The intonation is very odd, almost hypnotic. It s a wonder the English-speakers don t fall under the train as well. Simon ml.
                            Message 13 of 18 , Mar 28, 2001
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                              > A recorded voice then announces repeatedly in stentorian, upper-
                              > middle-class tones: "MIND ... THE GAP". Then all the non-English
                              > speaking tourists fall down the holes.

                              The intonation is very odd, almost hypnotic. It's a wonder the
                              English-speakers don't fall under the train as well.

                              Simon ml.
                            • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                              ... Wow! I would never have guessed it. JK
                              Message 14 of 18 , Mar 28, 2001
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                                In a message dated 3/28/01 12:13:47 AM, padamek@... writes:

                                >Ja si predstavuji, ze "mind the gap" se tyka skviry mezi vlakem a
                                >nastupistem. My zase mame "nevstupujte na bezpecnostni pas", hec^!

                                Wow! I would never have guessed it.

                                JK
                              • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                                ... I saw goulash two cats . And there is the ubiquitous chicken steak . Jamie
                                Message 15 of 18 , Mar 28, 2001
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                                  In a message dated 3/28/01 3:14:36 AM, simon.vollam@... writes:

                                  >I love these gaffes. One of my favourites was "pasta with shrumps and
                                  >muscles" on a menu.

                                  I saw "goulash two cats". And there is the ubiquitous "chicken steak".

                                  Jamie
                                • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                                  ... This leads to an interesting cultural difference: When I was in Plzen once, one of the women running the British Council office told me there was an
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Mar 28, 2001
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                                    In a message dated 3/28/01 5:37:18 AM, zdenek.bobek@... writes:

                                    >Please, close the door in cultural way.

                                    This leads to an interesting cultural difference: When I was in Plzen once,
                                    one of the women running the British Council office told me there was an
                                    "americke kulturni stredisko" in town, "jenze neni moc kulturni". I had to
                                    explain that in the US "[nationality] + cultural center" means narodni dum.

                                    Jamie
                                  • Zemedelec@aol.com
                                    In a message dated 3/27/1 14:55:00, zehrovak@dr.com writes: I have seen something like Forgetting to pay for your ticket will cost ... native ... In
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Mar 28, 2001
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                                      In a message dated 3/27/1 14:55:00, zehrovak@... writes:

                                      << > > I have seen something like "Forgetting to pay for your ticket will
                                      cost
                                      > you
                                      > > dear" in the Prague "metro" - does it sound natural to English
                                      native
                                      > > speakers?
                                      >
                                      > It is natural, but old-fashioned and inappropriate. >>

                                      In fact, chop off the last word and it sounds entirely contemporary (and not
                                      a little threatening: "Forgetting to pay for your ticket will cost you."
                                      Maybe with a graphic of a 600 K fine, or whatever it is these days.
                                    • Jenny Becker
                                      I know this could become a dangerously long thread, but I can t resist passing this one along. From a flier for a laundromat in Prague: In Prague for the
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Mar 28, 2001
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                                        I know this could become a dangerously long thread, but I can't resist
                                        passing this one along. From a flier for a laundromat in Prague:

                                        "In Prague for the time? Come and dry! You as well!"

                                        Jenny

                                        >
                                        >In a message dated 3/28/01 3:14:36 AM, simon.vollam@... writes:
                                        >
                                        > >I love these gaffes. One of my favourites was "pasta with shrumps and
                                        > >muscles" on a menu.
                                        >
                                        >I saw "goulash two cats". And there is the ubiquitous "chicken steak".
                                        >
                                        >Jamie

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