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Preklad z Aj do NJ

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  • Sabina Králová
    Dobry den, muj staly zakaznik hleda prekladatele pro preklad z anglictiny do nemciny, obor medicina. Pokud budete mit nekdo zajem, kontaktujte mne prosim
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 10, 2013
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      Dobry den,
       
      muj staly zakaznik hleda prekladatele pro preklad z anglictiny do nemciny, obor medicina. Pokud budete mit nekdo zajem, kontaktujte mne prosim offlist.
      Diky
      Sabina
    • James Kirchner
      American men tend to love sarcasm when they re together in a male atmosphere, and exchange of sarcasm is part of the male bonding ritual. Some women also
      Message 2 of 18 , Sep 10, 2013
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        American men tend to love sarcasm when they're together in a male atmosphere, and exchange of sarcasm is part of the "male bonding" ritual. Some women also engage in it with friends, but I imagine some react nastily to it.

        It may be a little different when Americans come face to face with a foreigner they don't know well. I think most Americans would enjoy sarcasm from a warm, friendly Italian or Peruvian (in fact, I've seen that), but I don't think they'd care for it from an arrogant Frenchman, a cold German or a stiff Englishman. We Americans never had any problem taking good-natured sarcasm from friendly Czechs.

        [POZOR! Before anyone reacts, notice that I did not say ALL Frenchman are arrogant or ALL Germans are cold or ALL Englishmen are stiff. This should be obvious, but if I don't insert this disclaimer, someone is going to accuse me of that.]

        However, I don't think what we're talking about here is sarcasm. What we're talking about is saying the opposite of what one means in order not to make waves. I wouldn't consider saying, "It's quite good," when you really think it's quite bad to be either sarcasm or brilliant. It's possible to be diplomatic without lying.

        In fact, well-raised Americans are generally taught the skill of being diplomatic without lying by their parents. I can remember my mom going through a situation with my brother and coaching him on saving face for the other person while still telling the truth.

        Jamie

        On Sep 10, 2013, at 12:09 PM, Hannah Geiger wrote:

        > In my experience, the Americans as a group are not too fond of sarcasms, be
        > they brilliant or not. This may be why some of the "British ways" leave
        > them either insecure or insulted.
        >
        >
        > Hanka
        >
        >
        > On Tue, Sep 10, 2013 at 11:59 AM, Hannah Geiger
        > <hannahgeiger115@...>wrote:
        >
        >> The one and only *HOW ARE YOU*. Unless asked by a friend, it is very
        >> unlikely that anyone will expect a story on one's health or how bad the
        >> roads are today.
        >>
        >> Yet, you have to give the J*ust fine, thank yo*u (or similar) every day.
        >> So far for the everyday "deceptions".
        >>
        >> As to the "I hear what you are saying", I have heard the "I hear you" on
        >> several occasions, but it is usually sincere, meaning" I get the drift", "I
        >> get the vibe, etc".
        >>
        >> Anyway, this topic reminds me of a long-forgotten thought: As a teenager
        >> I considered the English so polite that a secret thought would cross my
        >> mind if they reproduced the "normal" way.
        >>
        >> Hanka
        >>
        >>
        >> On Tue, Sep 10, 2013 at 11:17 AM, "Matej Klimes" <mklimes@...> wrote:
        >>
        >>> Funny you should mention good old Mikes - no hacek, BTW - that would make
        >>> him Kocour Mikes's relative and a Czech, AFAIK he was a Hungarian
        >>> aristocrat of some sort...
        >>> I picked the book up when I was in Denmark ages ago and found it in the
        >>> corner of the bookcase recently.. Matej
        >>> ------ Original Message ------
        >>> From: gerry.vickers@...
        >>> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        >>> Sent: 9.9.2013 17:12:31
        >>> Subject: [Czechlist] RE: British politeness
        >>>
        >>>>
        >>>> Yes, it's not bad at all. Politicians are masters at speaking like this.
        >>>> I know that Germans get particularly confused as they like to call a spade
        >>>> a spade. I have one German friend from university who was all over the
        >>>> place for the first few months he was in England for this reason - it was
        >>>> rather amusing.
        >>>>
        >>>> For a more in-depth analysis, read 'How to be an Alien' by George Mikes.
        >>>> It is old, but still very valid.
        >>>> It also depends on how you say it - e.g. a cheery 'Hey, that's really
        >>>> interesting, let's go with it' or 'Hmm, veeery interesting' whilst rubbing
        >>>> one's chin and frowning ... (see below)
        >>>>
        >>>> But it isn't just a purely British phenomenon e.g.
        >>>> http://www.degruyter.com/view/**j/jplr.2011.7.issue-2/jplr.**
        >>>> 2011.011/jplr.2011.011.xml<http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jplr.2011.7.issue-2/jplr.2011.011/jplr.2011.011.xml>
        >>>> - I'd like to see the rest of that article but EUR30 is a tad more than
        >>>> I'd like to spend ... When speaking to Americans and they say 'Wow that's
        >>>> awesome' that usually means 'That's a load of crap', or I understand 'You
        >>>> must come and stay' as 'I never want to see you again' :) It cuts both
        >>>> ways, and with the greatest of respect towards our friends across the pond,
        >>>> one just has to adapt one's way of thinking.
        >>>> A couple of gems from Mikes:
        >>>>
        >>>> If a European boy wants to tell a girl that he loves her, he goes down
        >>>> on his knees and tells her she is the sweetest, most beautiful and
        >>>> wonderful person in the world. She has something in her, something special,
        >>>> and he cannot live one more minute without her. Sometimes, to make this all
        >>>> clear, he shoots himself. This happens every day in European countries
        >>>> where people have soul.
        >>>> In England the boy puts his hand o the girl?s shoulder and says,
        >>>> quietly, "You're all right, you know."
        >>>> If he really loves her he says "I really quite like you, in fact."
        >>>> If he wants to marry a girl, he says. "I say ... would you ... ?"
        >>>> If he wants to sleep with her, "I say ... shall we ... ?"
        >>>>
        >>>> ----
        >>>>
        >>>> It is easy to be rude in Europe. You just shout and call people animal
        >>>> names. To be very rude, you can make up terrible stories about them.
        >>>> In England people are rude in a very different way. If somebody tells
        >>>> you an untrue story, in Europe you say, "You are a liar, sir." In England
        >>>> you just say, "Oh, is that so?" Or, "That's quite an unusual story, isn't
        >>>> it?".
        >>>> A few years ago, when I only knew about ten words of English, I went for
        >>>> a job. The man who saw me said quietly, "I'm afraid your English is a bit
        >>>> unusual." In any European language this means, "Kick this man out of the
        >>>> office!"
        >>>> A hundred years ago, if somebody made the Sultan of Turkey or the Czar
        >>>> of Russia angry, they cut the person's head off immediately. But when
        >>>> somebody made the English queen angry, she said, "We are not amused," and
        >>>> the English are still, to this day, very proud of their queen for being so
        >>>> rude.
        >>>> Terribly rude things to say are: "I'm afraid that ... ", "How strange
        >>>> that ..." and "I'm sorry, but ... " You must look very serious when saying
        >>>> such things.
        >>>> It is true that sometimes you hear people shout, "Get out of here!" or
        >>>> "Shut your big mouth!" or "Dirty pig!", etc. This is very un-English.
        >>>> Foreigners who lived in England hundreds of years ago probably introduced
        >>>> these things to the English language.
        >>>>
        >>>> ---
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>> --- In czechlist@yahoogroups.com, <kzgafas@...> wrote:
        >>>>
        >>>> I find this article as dramatically interesting. I am curious to read
        >>>> comments of British here.
        >>>>
        >>>> http://www.telegraph.co.uk/**news/newstopics/howaboutthat/**
        >>>> 10280244/Translation-table-**explaining-the-truth-behind-**
        >>>> British-politeness-becomes-**internet-hit.html<http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/10280244/Translation-table-explaining-the-truth-behind-British-politeness-becomes-internet-hit.html>
        >>>>
        >>>> ______________________________**_________________
        >>> Czechlist mailing list
        >>> Czechlist@...
        >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-**bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist<http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist>
        >>>
        >>
        >>
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      • <saba-k@...>
        Dobry den,   muj staly zakaznik hleda prekladatele pro preklad z anglictiny do nemciny, obor medicina. Pokud budete mit nekdo zajem, kontaktujte mne prosim
        Message 3 of 18 , Sep 10, 2013
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          Dobry den,
           
          muj staly zakaznik hleda prekladatele pro preklad z anglictiny do nemciny, obor medicina. Pokud budete mit nekdo zajem, kontaktujte mne prosim offlist.
          Diky
          Sabina
        • Sabina Králová
          Dobry den, nemate prosim nekdo zkusenosti s francouzskou agenturou Right Word Europe? Na ProZ mĂĄ hodnoceni od 3 prekladatelu, ale nejak mi nesedi jejich
          Message 4 of 18 , Sep 11, 2013
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            Dobry den,

            nemate prosim nekdo zkusenosti s francouzskou agenturou Right Word Europe? Na ProZ má hodnoceni od 3 prekladatelu, ale nejak mi nesedi jejich webove stranky.

            Diky

            Sabina

          • <saba-k@...>
            Dobry den, nemate prosim nekdo zkusenosti s francouzskou agenturou Right Word Europe? Na ProZ mĂĄ hodnoceni od 3 prekladatelu, ale nejak mi nesedi jejich
            Message 5 of 18 , Sep 11, 2013
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              Dobry den,

              nemate prosim nekdo zkusenosti s francouzskou agenturou Right Word Europe? Na ProZ má hodnoceni od 3 prekladatelu, ale nejak mi nesedi jejich webove stranky.

              Diky

              Sabina

              =
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