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Fwd: [Czechlist] marmalade dropper

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  • geigerhannah20
    The whole breakfast thing seems a bit stilted to me, I ll take a shocker anytime. Here is more, though: marmalade dropperbritish englishalso muffin
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 5, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
       
      The whole breakfast thing seems a bit stilted to me, I'll take a shocker anytime.  Here is more, though:
       

      marmalade dropperbritish englishalso muffin chokeramerican english

      noun [countable]

      a piece of information, especially a newspaper article or headline, that is very shocking or exciting

      'An editor I once worked for had a pet term for a story that would shock and amaze breakfast readers. "I want at least onemarmalade dropper from you this week," he'd bellow. It was an apt image, reader's marmalade plopping from their toast into their laps as they sat transfixed by some nugget of sheer unbelievability you'd managed to work into a story.'

      CAR AND DRIVING 2000

      The expression marmalade dropper first appeared in the mid-1990s, and often has fairly positive overtones when applied to creative writing. Describing a novel as 'a real marmalade dropper' implies a degree of enjoyment and praise for a skilful piece of writing which has had an impact on the reader.

      describing a novel as 'a realmarmalade dropper' implies a degree of enjoyment and praise for a skilful piece of writing

      Use of the expression is not confined to describing writing however. We can find evidence for it being used in descriptions of photographic material in journalism, particularly in reference to photographs depicting scenes of violence, often where there is some debate as to their appropriateness, for example:

      'There is a very subtle line between where a picture had impact and where it becomes what we call a marmalade dropper.'

      http://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/buzzword/entries/marmalade-dropper.html


      From: culka@...
      Reply-to: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: 9/5/2013 12:46:26 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time
      Subj: Re: [Czechlist] marmalade dropper
       
       

      Jamie, not knowing exactly where you are from (Karlovy Vary, yes) - I mean in the States - maybe you come from one of the states where rather T-bone steak choker is used ... :-)
      Honza
       
       
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 11:53 PM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] marmalade dropper

       

      Americans would be no more likely to know what a "muffin choker" is than to know what a "marmalade dropper" is. That expression sounds foreign to me also.

      I googled the exact phrase an got fewer than 500 results, mostly from websites that are not American. For expressions that really exist but that most Americans don't understand, the numbers would be in the thousands or tens of thousands.

      It makes me think of those books from the old days in the CSSR or the CSFR, like "Americko-Cesky Slovnik", which became my younger sister's favorite joke book because of all the improbable expressions it contained (she made me buy her a copy even though she doesn't understand Czech), and "Wang Dang American Slang" which contained some expressions that one person probably said in one place once.

      We do use the expression "canard", which is French for "kachna", but as far as I know, we don't have a word for a canard that's shocking.

      Jamie

      On Sep 4, 2013, at 4:45 PM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:

      > good to know, thanks
      >
      >
      > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of gerry.vickers@...
      > Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 7:38 PM
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Czechlist] RE: marmalade dropper
      >
      >
      >
      > Apparently it is known as a 'muffin choker' in US English http://notdoubledutch.wordpress.com/2009/05/03/marmalade-dropper/
      >
      >
      > --- In czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:czechlist@yahoogroups.com>, <jiri.pilucha@...<mailto:jiri.pilucha@...>> wrote:
      >
      > Wordnik Word of the Day says the following (see below)
      >
      > Only now have I noticed that it also says "According to the Word Spy, this phrase 'has appeared almost exclusively in British newspapers and magazines.' "
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > marmalade dropper
      >
      >
      >
      > Highly stunning information, especially when associated with the news.
      >
      > It is what is known on Fleet Street as a 'marmalade dropper' -- a story so surprising that the piece of toast you are eating as you read it falls from your hand.
      > Toby Young, 'Status Anxiety,' The Spectator, January 28, 2009<http://wordnik.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=1c9b004e359a58df355705423&id=97f8b833f3&e=b7f3a5f35a>
      >
      > When Gordon Brown had breakfast at the Guardian recently, the real marmalade-dropper was his description of top-up fees as 'this ridiculous idea'.
      > 'What the Fees Are For,' The Telegraph, December 5, 2002<http://wordnik.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=1c9b004e359a58df355705423&id=595e72d02c&e=b7f3a5f35a>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of gerry.vickers@<mailto:gerry.vickers@>...
      > Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 4:57 PM
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: [Czechlist] RE: marmalade dropper
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I had to look it up. .Very few people here would know what this means as well - it might be British slang, but certainly not widely used.
      >
      >
      > --- In czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:czechlist@yahoogroups.com>, <czechlist@...<mailto:czechlist@...>> wrote:
      >
      > I think it's pretty safe to say that almost no one in North America would know what a "marmalade dropper" is. It appears to be British slang.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Sep 4, 2013, at 10:38 AM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:
      >
      >> Today's Wordnik Word of the day is marmalade dropper. Seems to be an exclusively British term is that right?
      >> Jiri
      >>
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