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Re: [Czechlist] marmalade dropper

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  • James Kirchner
    Cheerios are a venerable old American oat cereal that I believe is more commonly eaten in the US than cornflakes. Even elderly people ate them as snacks when
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 5 7:25 AM
      Cheerios are a venerable old American oat cereal that I believe is more commonly eaten in the US than cornflakes. Even elderly people ate them as snacks when they were toddlers. The American variant hardly has any sugar, so they're good for little kids to munch on. (I understand the brand is also made in the UK, but there they add more sugar.)

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheerios

      Americans use the word "cheerio" only for that cereal or for the purpose of making fun of the British. It's not part of our daily vocabulary, and we don't use it in greetings and toasts.

      Jamie

      On Sep 5, 2013, at 9:30 AM, Jan Culka wrote:

      > Thank you for a comprehensive explanation.
      > Why "call me stupid"? Honestly, I would expect a marmalade dispenser, too.
      > Jar of marmalade? Or has anybody mentioned dropping a bread slice spread with marmalade (of course, marmalade side down)?
      > I understood and appreciated coffee spitter but why cheerio inhaler? Did you mean shock-induced inhaling of (alcoholic) liquid?
      > Sorry, too many question marx ...
      > Honza
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Detroit, with a few years in Marianske Lazne.
      >
      > In Detroit, it is more likely to be a kielbasa choker or a paczke choker.
      >
      > My theory about the term "muffin choker" is that some britophile American journalist liked the term "marmalade dropper" but knew Americans wouldn't understand it, so made a failed attempt at creating an equivalent American term. One of the reasons it doesn't work is that some Americans eat muffins for breakfast, but not most. A better term would be "cornflake choker" or "Cheerio inhaler", or maybe "coffee spitter".
      >
      > Call me stupid, but it took me several hours to realize that "marmalade dropper" was meant to indicate that the story was so shocking that a person dropped his jar of marmalade. For hours, I thought it indicated a device for dispensing very small amounts of marmalade. You see, we don't eat the bread-and-marmalade breakfast here.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Sep 5, 2013, at 3:40 AM, Jan Culka wrote:
      >
      >> Jamie, not knowing exactly where you are from (Karlovy Vary, yes) - I mean in the States - maybe you come from one of the states where rather T-bone steak choker is used ... :-)
      >> Honza
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> ----- Original Message -----
      >> From: James Kirchner
      >> To: czechlist@...
      >> Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 11:53 PM
      >> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] marmalade dropper
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Americans would be no more likely to know what a "muffin choker" is than to know what a "marmalade dropper" is. That expression sounds foreign to me also.
      >>
      >> I googled the exact phrase an got fewer than 500 results, mostly from websites that are not American. For expressions that really exist but that most Americans don't understand, the numbers would be in the thousands or tens of thousands.
      >>
      >> It makes me think of those books from the old days in the CSSR or the CSFR, like "Americko-Cesky Slovnik", which became my younger sister's favorite joke book because of all the improbable expressions it contained (she made me buy her a copy even though she doesn't understand Czech), and "Wang Dang American Slang" which contained some expressions that one person probably said in one place once.
      >>
      >> We do use the expression "canard", which is French for "kachna", but as far as I know, we don't have a word for a canard that's shocking.
      >>
      >> Jamie
      >>
      >> On Sep 4, 2013, at 4:45 PM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:
      >>
      >>> good to know, thanks
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of gerry.vickers@...
      >>> Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 7:38 PM
      >>> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      >>> Subject: [Czechlist] RE: marmalade dropper
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Apparently it is known as a 'muffin choker' in US English http://notdoubledutch.wordpress.com/2009/05/03/marmalade-dropper/
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> --- In czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:czechlist@yahoogroups.com>, <jiri.pilucha@...<mailto:jiri.pilucha@...>> wrote:
      >>>
      >>> Wordnik Word of the Day says the following (see below)
      >>>
      >>> Only now have I noticed that it also says "According to the Word Spy, this phrase 'has appeared almost exclusively in British newspapers and magazines.' "
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> marmalade dropper
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Highly stunning information, especially when associated with the news.
      >>>
      >>> It is what is known on Fleet Street as a 'marmalade dropper' -- a story so surprising that the piece of toast you are eating as you read it falls from your hand.
      >>> Toby Young, 'Status Anxiety,' The Spectator, January 28, 2009<http://wordnik.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=1c9b004e359a58df355705423&id=97f8b833f3&e=b7f3a5f35a>
      >>>
      >>> When Gordon Brown had breakfast at the Guardian recently, the real marmalade-dropper was his description of top-up fees as 'this ridiculous idea'.
      >>> 'What the Fees Are For,' The Telegraph, December 5, 2002<http://wordnik.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=1c9b004e359a58df355705423&id=595e72d02c&e=b7f3a5f35a>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of gerry.vickers@<mailto:gerry.vickers@>...
      >>> Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 4:57 PM
      >>> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      >>> Subject: [Czechlist] RE: marmalade dropper
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> I had to look it up. .Very few people here would know what this means as well - it might be British slang, but certainly not widely used.
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> --- In czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:czechlist@yahoogroups.com>, <czechlist@...<mailto:czechlist@...>> wrote:
      >>>
      >>> I think it's pretty safe to say that almost no one in North America would know what a "marmalade dropper" is. It appears to be British slang.
      >>>
      >>> Jamie
      >>>
      >>> On Sep 4, 2013, at 10:38 AM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:
      >>>
      >>>> Today's Wordnik Word of the day is marmalade dropper. Seems to be an exclusively British term is that right?
      >>>> Jiri
      >>>>
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    • Jan Culka
      Vážené kolegyně, vážení kolegové, potřebuji do 10. ledna přeložit cca 700 stran rozsudků z Č do A. Pokud má někdo čas a chuť, pošlete mi své
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 13, 2013
        
        Vážené kolegyně, vážení kolegové,
        potřebuji do 10. ledna přeložit cca 700 stran rozsudků z Č do A.
        Pokud má někdo čas a chuť, pošlete mi své cenové nabídky na culka@....
        Výhoda je v tom, že jednotlivé rozsudky nejsou příliš rozsáhlé a nemusejí být terminologicky úplně jednolité. Všechny se týkají jedné kauzy z oblasti bytového družstevnictví, budou si tedy dost podobné.
        Honza
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