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RE: [Czechlist] almost

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  • Pilucha, Jiri
    I did not see any logic in it but now it makes better sense to me, thanks From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 29 4:02 PM
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      I did not see any logic in it but now it makes better sense to me, thanks


      From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Valerie Talacko
      Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 12:59 AM
      To: czechlist@...
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] almost



      I suppose the logic is "I can see you're not actually ready, so I'll
      ask you if you're almost ready, with the strong insinuation that you
      ought to be ready".

      On 30.07.2013 00:49, Valerie Talacko wrote:
      > With the "almost" they're just conveying more impatience. Very common
      > in the UK, too.
      >
      > "Are you ready?" could sound as if you're not bothered, whereas "Are
      > you almost ready?"
      > makes it clearer that you're wanting to get going.
      >
      > Valerie
      >
      > On 29.07.2013 23:31, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:
      >> Is this common US usage, or is it just my friend's idiolect
      >>
      >> Instead of asking "Are you ready?" a person would ask "Are you
      >> almost
      >> ready?" even though the situation is urgent and there is no time to
      >> waste
      >>
      >> Jiri
      >>
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>
      >> _______________________________________________
      >> Czechlist mailing list
      >> Czechlist@...<mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
      >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist

      _______________________________________________
      Czechlist mailing list
      Czechlist@...<mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
      http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • James Kirchner
      I agree with Valarie s assessment. Consider this: On long car trips, children start to lose patience after a couple of hours, and the classic question they
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 29 7:11 PM
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        I agree with Valarie's assessment.

        Consider this: On long car trips, children start to lose patience after a couple of hours, and the classic question they ask over and over, in a whining voice, is, "Are we almost there?!"

        Jamie

        On Jul 29, 2013, at 5:31 PM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:

        > Is this common US usage, or is it just my friend's idiolect
        >
        > Instead of asking "Are you ready?" a person would ask "Are you almost ready?" even though the situation is urgent and there is no time to waste
        >
        > Jiri
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > _______________________________________________
        > Czechlist mailing list
        > Czechlist@...
        > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


        _______________________________________________
        Czechlist mailing list
        Czechlist@...
        http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
      • Petr
        Aha, tak to je jako ceske uz : Uz tam budeme? Jsi uz hotova? (Divadlo za chvili zacne a ona se musi porad jeste sminkovat). Petr A.
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 29 8:51 PM
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          Aha, tak to je jako ceske "uz":
          Uz tam budeme?
          Jsi uz hotova? (Divadlo za chvili zacne a ona se musi porad jeste sminkovat).
          Petr A.
          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
          >
          > I agree with Valarie's assessment.
          >
          > Consider this: On long car trips, children start to lose patience after a couple of hours, and the classic question they ask over and over, in a whining voice, is, "Are we almost there?!"
          >
          > Jamie
          >
          > On Jul 29, 2013, at 5:31 PM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:
          >
          > > Is this common US usage, or is it just my friend's idiolect
          > >
          > > Instead of asking "Are you ready?" a person would ask "Are you almost ready?" even though the situation is urgent and there is no time to waste
          > >
          > > Jiri
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > > _______________________________________________
          > > Czechlist mailing list
          > > Czechlist@...
          > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          >
          >
          > _______________________________________________
          > Czechlist mailing list
          > Czechlist@...
          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          >
        • Petr
          Pripadne s konecne : Uz tam konecne budeme? Jsi uz konecne hotova? P.A.
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 29 8:56 PM
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            Pripadne s "konecne":
            Uz tam konecne budeme?
            Jsi uz konecne hotova?
            P.A.

            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
            >
            > I agree with Valarie's assessment.
            >
            > Consider this: On long car trips, children start to lose patience after a couple of hours, and the classic question they ask over and over, in a whining voice, is, "Are we almost there?!"
            >
            > Jamie
            >
            > On Jul 29, 2013, at 5:31 PM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:
            >
            > > Is this common US usage, or is it just my friend's idiolect
            > >
            > > Instead of asking "Are you ready?" a person would ask "Are you almost ready?" even though the situation is urgent and there is no time to waste
            > >
            > > Jiri
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > > _______________________________________________
            > > Czechlist mailing list
            > > Czechlist@...
            > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >
            >
            > _______________________________________________
            > Czechlist mailing list
            > Czechlist@...
            > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >
          • Mark Gillis
            This is in a similar vein, but I think konecne suggests a higher level of impatience, as would the English equivalent, finally . It can be used not really
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 30 1:24 AM
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              This is in a similar vein, but I think "konecne" suggests a higher level of impatience, as would the English equivalent, "finally". It can be used not really as a question, but as a post facto criticism of someone who clearly is ready but you want to make clear to them that you are angry they took so long in getting there.



              ________________________________
              From: Petr <padamek@...>
              To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 5:56 AM
              Subject: [Czechlist] Re: almost



               

              Pripadne s "konecne":
              Uz tam konecne budeme?
              Jsi uz konecne hotova?
              P.A.

              --- In mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
              >
              > I agree with Valarie's assessment.
              >
              > Consider this: On long car trips, children start to lose patience after a couple of hours, and the classic question they ask over and over, in a whining voice, is, "Are we almost there?!"
              >
              > Jamie
              >
              > On Jul 29, 2013, at 5:31 PM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:
              >
              > > Is this common US usage, or is it just my friend's idiolect
              > >
              > > Instead of asking "Are you ready?" a person would ask "Are you almost ready?" even though the situation is urgent and there is no time to waste
              > >
              > > Jiri
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > > _______________________________________________
              > > Czechlist mailing list
              > > Czechlist@...
              > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >
              >
              > _______________________________________________
              > Czechlist mailing list
              > Czechlist@...
              > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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