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Re: [Czechlist] brume

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  • Mike Trittipo
    It sounds mixed-up at best. I think I d recognize it even if I were not fluent in French. It s OK in Scots, after all. But I suspect that some native English
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
      It sounds mixed-up at best. I think I'd recognize it even if I were not
      fluent in French. It's OK in Scots, after all. But I suspect that some
      native English speakers might not recognize it, and to many native English
      speakers it would come off as comic: maybe like "Houses in the foggy, foggy
      dew," to quote from Once Upon a Mattress. ("I come from the land of the
      foggy, foggy dew.")


      On Jun 18 2013, Zuzana Benesova wrote:
      >I'd like your opinions on the word "brume".
      >
      My client (an architect) fancies translating the nickname his project
      "Domy v mlze" as "Houses in brume." ... parts will
      protrude above a certain level as if above a low-lying fog. I've never
      heard of this word before and from my brief research it does not seem very
      common.
      >
      On a blog, a photographer called his picture "Bovines in brume" but felt
      the need to add a dictionary definition of "brume" right below.
      >
      What would "Houses in brume" sound like to you (esp. native speakers, that
      is)?




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    • Zuzana Benesova
      Thanks to all of you so far. This was my first impression also - it would sound weird. Thing is, the English version of their web (or any other, for that
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
        Thanks to all of you so far.

        This was my first impression also - it would sound weird. Thing is, the English version of their web (or any other, for that matter) presentation will certainly aim at an audience consisting of people who speak English but may not necessarily be native speakers of it. So if the word does not sound right for English natives it would be outright incomprehensible for the rest... I already advised the client against it and recommended that he should go with the good old mist instead :-)

        Thanks again and I will be pleased to hear from anyone else if interested.
        Zuzka

        18. 6. 2013 v 22:07, Mike Trittipo:

        > It sounds mixed-up at best. I think I'd recognize it even if I were not fluent in French. It's OK in Scots, after all. But I suspect that some native English speakers might not recognize it, and to many native English speakers it would come off as comic: maybe like "Houses in the foggy, foggy dew," to quote from Once Upon a Mattress. ("I come from the land of the foggy, foggy dew.")
        >
        >
        > On Jun 18 2013, Zuzana Benesova wrote:
        >> I'd like your opinions on the word "brume".
        >>
        > My client (an architect) fancies translating the nickname his project "Domy v mlze" as "Houses in brume." ... parts will protrude above a certain level as if above a low-lying fog. I've never heard of this word before and from my brief research it does not seem very common.
        >>
        > On a blog, a photographer called his picture "Bovines in brume" but felt the need to add a dictionary definition of "brume" right below.
        >>
        > What would "Houses in brume" sound like to you (esp. native speakers, that is)?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _______________________________________________
        > Czechlist mailing list
        > Czechlist@...
        > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


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      • James Kirchner
        That s the smartest thing to do. Although some people on the list know the word, I ll bet if I stood outside a building at one of the universities where I ve
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
          That's the smartest thing to do.

          Although some people on the list know the word, I'll bet if I stood outside a building at one of the universities where I've taught and asked the first 50 people what "brume" meant, not more than 1 would understand the word. If I stood outside the English literature department, maybe 5 would know the word. Plus, I'd have to write the word down in order for them not to understand it as "broom".

          Jamie

          On Jun 18, 2013, at 4:21 PM, Zuzana Benesova wrote:

          > Thanks to all of you so far.
          >
          > This was my first impression also - it would sound weird. Thing is, the English version of their web (or any other, for that matter) presentation will certainly aim at an audience consisting of people who speak English but may not necessarily be native speakers of it. So if the word does not sound right for English natives it would be outright incomprehensible for the rest... I already advised the client against it and recommended that he should go with the good old mist instead :-)
          >
          > Thanks again and I will be pleased to hear from anyone else if interested.
          > Zuzka
          >
          > 18. 6. 2013 v 22:07, Mike Trittipo:
          >
          >> It sounds mixed-up at best. I think I'd recognize it even if I were not fluent in French. It's OK in Scots, after all. But I suspect that some native English speakers might not recognize it, and to many native English speakers it would come off as comic: maybe like "Houses in the foggy, foggy dew," to quote from Once Upon a Mattress. ("I come from the land of the foggy, foggy dew.")
          >>
          >>
          >> On Jun 18 2013, Zuzana Benesova wrote:
          >>> I'd like your opinions on the word "brume".
          >>>
          >> My client (an architect) fancies translating the nickname his project "Domy v mlze" as "Houses in brume." ... parts will protrude above a certain level as if above a low-lying fog. I've never heard of this word before and from my brief research it does not seem very common.
          >>>
          >> On a blog, a photographer called his picture "Bovines in brume" but felt the need to add a dictionary definition of "brume" right below.
          >>>
          >> What would "Houses in brume" sound like to you (esp. native speakers, that is)?
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> _______________________________________________
          >> Czechlist mailing list
          >> Czechlist@...
          >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          >
          >
          > _______________________________________________
          > Czechlist mailing list
          > Czechlist@...
          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


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        • Zuzana Benesova
          Good to have some sense of proportion, Jamie :-) Thanks again. Luckily, the architect, although creative that way, is also rather sensible and will take the
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
            Good to have some sense of proportion, Jamie :-)
            Thanks again.

            Luckily, the architect, although creative that way, is also rather sensible and will take the recommendation plus thank me profusely :-)

            Zuzka


            18. 6. 2013 v 22:37, James Kirchner:

            > That's the smartest thing to do.
            >
            > Although some people on the list know the word, I'll bet if I stood outside a building at one of the universities where I've taught and asked the first 50 people what "brume" meant, not more than 1 would understand the word. If I stood outside the English literature department, maybe 5 would know the word. Plus, I'd have to write the word down in order for them not to understand it as "broom".
            >
            > Jamie
            >
            > On Jun 18, 2013, at 4:21 PM, Zuzana Benesova wrote:
            >
            >> Thanks to all of you so far.
            >>
            >> This was my first impression also - it would sound weird. Thing is, the English version of their web (or any other, for that matter) presentation will certainly aim at an audience consisting of people who speak English but may not necessarily be native speakers of it. So if the word does not sound right for English natives it would be outright incomprehensible for the rest... I already advised the client against it and recommended that he should go with the good old mist instead :-)
            >>
            >> Thanks again and I will be pleased to hear from anyone else if interested.
            >> Zuzka
            >>
            >> 18. 6. 2013 v 22:07, Mike Trittipo:
            >>
            >>> It sounds mixed-up at best. I think I'd recognize it even if I were not fluent in French. It's OK in Scots, after all. But I suspect that some native English speakers might not recognize it, and to many native English speakers it would come off as comic: maybe like "Houses in the foggy, foggy dew," to quote from Once Upon a Mattress. ("I come from the land of the foggy, foggy dew.")
            >>>
            >>>
            >>> On Jun 18 2013, Zuzana Benesova wrote:
            >>>> I'd like your opinions on the word "brume".
            >>>>
            >>> My client (an architect) fancies translating the nickname his project "Domy v mlze" as "Houses in brume." ... parts will protrude above a certain level as if above a low-lying fog. I've never heard of this word before and from my brief research it does not seem very common.
            >>>>
            >>> On a blog, a photographer called his picture "Bovines in brume" but felt the need to add a dictionary definition of "brume" right below.
            >>>>
            >>> What would "Houses in brume" sound like to you (esp. native speakers, that is)?
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>> _______________________________________________
            >>> Czechlist mailing list
            >>> Czechlist@...
            >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >>
            >>
            >> _______________________________________________
            >> Czechlist mailing list
            >> Czechlist@...
            >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >
            >
            > _______________________________________________
            > Czechlist mailing list
            > Czechlist@...
            > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


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