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Re: Finger food

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  • wustpisk
    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=7UIjVGcSe8MC&pg=PA288&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
      http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=7UIjVGcSe8MC&pg=PA288&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false


      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Kent Christopher Kasha" <kasha@...> wrote:
      >
      > In Canada when you say you are going to a gig then it is understood that you
      > are going to be one of the musicians playing. It doesn't necessarily have to
      > be a job, though it usually is. I played a lot of gigs where I wasn't paid a
      > cent (in the best cases I didn't have to pay for the beer I drank). And it
      > doesn't have to even mean there is a performance involved. Making an album
      > as a session musician is just as much a gig as playing on a smokey jazz club
      > stage.
      >
      >
      >
      > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      > Of James Kirchner
      > Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2013 3:23 PM
      > To: czechlist@...
      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I think the meaning of "gig" must have expanded on your side of the ocean,
      > because here the audience definitely doesn't call it a gig, as far as I
      > know.
      >
      > Symphony musicians here refer to their jobs as gigs just the way jazz or
      > rock musicians would, but this doesn't penetrate the wall into the
      > terminology used by the audience. If she's talking to me or her musician
      > friends, she'll say she's doing a gig, but to an outsider she might say
      > she's playing a concert.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Apr 4, 2013, at 9:14 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
      >
      > > You'll probably go on another 'no one this side of Atlantic
      > > says/understand this' trip, Jamie, but AFAIK gig is a musical
      > > event/performance from both the audience's and the performer's point of
      > > view in Brit Eng..
      > >
      > > So a musician has a gig at this or that place.. a music fan goes to
      > > gigs, is going to this or that gig, etc. Not sure if I ever heard it
      > > used for fans in the US (live or in media), so not going to argue with
      > > you, in fact, not going to argue with you period, but come on it's not
      > > that difficult to *suss out*, is it?
      > >
      > > And BTW gigs do not normally apply to symphony concerts (at least on
      > > the audience side, must be a class thing..)
      > >
      > > Sorry, couldn't resist * * :)
      > >
      > > M
      > >
      > >
      > > ------ Original Message ------
      > > From: "James Kirchner" <czechlist@...
      > <mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org> >
      > > To: czechlist@... <mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org>
      > > Sent: 4.4.2013 13:42:09
      > > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
      > >> The survey ranked me as "Established Middle Class", which was the
      > >> class right below "Elite". But, of course, this is in the mentality of
      > >> a nation that's hyper-sensitive to social class or even the mention of
      > >> it. I've mentioned socio-economic class from the American point of
      > >> view, as something that just exists, doesn't make people better or
      > >> worse and that people routinely move in or out of, and had Brits freak
      > >> out as if I were mentioning something obscene. It took me a while to
      > >> figure out why they were sensitive.
      > >>
      > >> I didn't understand what "go to gigs" meant, because a gig is a job,
      > >> or more specifically a job a musician is hired for. When my sister
      > >> plays, it's a gig to her, but it's a symphony concert to the attendees.
      > >>
      > >> Thank you for the suggestions, Gerry.
      > >>
      > >> Jamie
      > >>
      > >> On Apr 4, 2013, at 7:27 AM, wustpisk wrote:
      > >>
      > >>> It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose.
      > >>>
      > >>> First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973
      > >>>
      > >>> and then decide whether you want to call them finger foods, canapes,
      > >> hors d'oeuvres, light snacks, antipasti, amuse-bouche, whatever.
      > >>>
      > >>> I agree that 'finger foods' sounds very slightly odd, but it
      > >> wouldn't cause me to complain.
      > >>> Personally I would plump for canapes, but even that conjures up an
      > >> image of Delboy Trotter bringing in a tray of jam sarnies.
      > >>>
      > >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com> ,
      > James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
      > >>>>
      > >>>> There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never
      > >> understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that
      > >> understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of
      > >> situations like receptions where you have people walking around with
      > >> trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would
      > >> never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food",
      > >> because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers
      > >> or, worse yet, of people fingering food.
      > >>>>
      > >>>> If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the
      > >> Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an
      > >> image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call
      > >> hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian
      > >> dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in
      > >> that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the
      > >> hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in
      > >> the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.
      > >>>>
      > >>>> I wonder if there's another alternative.
      > >>>>
      > >>>> Jamie
      > >>>>
      > >>>> On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
      > >>>>
      > >>>>> I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres
      > >> are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the
      > >> fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet
      > >> food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be
      > >> canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about
      > >> little sandwiches.
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>> I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the
      > >> kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly
      > >> context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the
      > >> weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not
      > >> really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from
      > >> the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're
      > >> not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp
      > >> (chip) or peanut or two.
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>> Valerie
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>> On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
      > >>>>>> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
      > >>>>>> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
      > >>>>>>
      > >>>>>> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
      > >>>>>> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms,
      > >> etc.
      > >>>>>>
      > >>>>>> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
      > >>>>>> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
      > >>>>>> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
      > >>>>>>
      > >>>>>> Any opinions on this?
      > >>>>>>
      > >>>>>> Jamie
      > >>>>>>
      > >>>>>>
      > >>>>>> _______________________________________________
      > >>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
      > >>>>>> Czechlist@
      > >>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>>
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