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Re: [Czechlist] Finger food

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  • Valerie Talacko
    I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d oeuvres are usually part of a meal and aren t necessarily eaten with the fingers, whereas finger food
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
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      I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres are
      usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the fingers,
      whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet food etc.
      that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be canapes, but that's
      pretty specific and they may be talking more about little sandwiches.

      I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the kind
      of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly
      context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the
      weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not
      really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from the
      context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're not
      talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp (chip) or
      peanut or two.

      Valerie



      On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
      > I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
      > learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
      >
      > There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
      > all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms, etc.
      >
      > For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
      > food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
      > Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
      >
      > Any opinions on this?
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      >
      > _______________________________________________
      > Czechlist mailing list
      > Czechlist@...
      > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


      _______________________________________________
      Czechlist mailing list
      Czechlist@...
      http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
    • James Kirchner
      There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never understood hors d oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that understanding of them in
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
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        There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of situations like receptions where you have people walking around with trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food", because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers or, worse yet, of people fingering food.

        If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.

        I wonder if there's another alternative.

        Jamie

        On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:

        > I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about little sandwiches.
        >
        > I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp (chip) or peanut or two.
        >
        > Valerie
        >
        >
        >
        > On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
        >> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
        >> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
        >>
        >> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
        >> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms, etc.
        >>
        >> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
        >> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
        >> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
        >>
        >> Any opinions on this?
        >>
        >> Jamie
        >>
        >>
        >> _______________________________________________
        >> Czechlist mailing list
        >> Czechlist@...
        >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        >
        >
        > _______________________________________________
        > Czechlist mailing list
        > Czechlist@...
        > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


        _______________________________________________
        Czechlist mailing list
        Czechlist@...
        http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
      • wustpisk
        It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose. First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973 and then decide whether you want to call them
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
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          It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose.

          First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973

          and then decide whether you want to call them finger foods, canapes, hors d'oeuvres, light snacks, antipasti, amuse-bouche, whatever.

          I agree that 'finger foods' sounds very slightly odd, but it wouldn't cause me to complain.
          Personally I would plump for canapes, but even that conjures up an image of Delboy Trotter bringing in a tray of jam sarnies.

          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
          >
          > There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of situations like receptions where you have people walking around with trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food", because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers or, worse yet, of people fingering food.
          >
          > If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.
          >
          > I wonder if there's another alternative.
          >
          > Jamie
          >
          > On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
          >
          > > I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about little sandwiches.
          > >
          > > I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp (chip) or peanut or two.
          > >
          > > Valerie
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
          > >> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
          > >> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
          > >>
          > >> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
          > >> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms, etc.
          > >>
          > >> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
          > >> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
          > >> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
          > >>
          > >> Any opinions on this?
          > >>
          > >> Jamie
          > >>
          > >>
          > >> _______________________________________________
          > >> Czechlist mailing list
          > >> Czechlist@...
          > >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          > >
          > >
          > > _______________________________________________
          > > Czechlist mailing list
          > > Czechlist@...
          > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          >
          >
          > _______________________________________________
          > Czechlist mailing list
          > Czechlist@...
          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          >
        • James Kirchner
          The survey ranked me as Established Middle Class , which was the class right below Elite . But, of course, this is in the mentality of a nation that s
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
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            The survey ranked me as "Established Middle Class", which was the class right below "Elite". But, of course, this is in the mentality of a nation that's hyper-sensitive to social class or even the mention of it. I've mentioned socio-economic class from the American point of view, as something that just exists, doesn't make people better or worse and that people routinely move in or out of, and had Brits freak out as if I were mentioning something obscene. It took me a while to figure out why they were sensitive.

            I didn't understand what "go to gigs" meant, because a gig is a job, or more specifically a job a musician is hired for. When my sister plays, it's a gig to her, but it's a symphony concert to the attendees.

            Thank you for the suggestions, Gerry.

            Jamie

            On Apr 4, 2013, at 7:27 AM, wustpisk wrote:

            > It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose.
            >
            > First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973
            >
            > and then decide whether you want to call them finger foods, canapes, hors d'oeuvres, light snacks, antipasti, amuse-bouche, whatever.
            >
            > I agree that 'finger foods' sounds very slightly odd, but it wouldn't cause me to complain.
            > Personally I would plump for canapes, but even that conjures up an image of Delboy Trotter bringing in a tray of jam sarnies.
            >
            > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of situations like receptions where you have people walking around with trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food", because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers or, worse yet, of people fingering food.
            >>
            >> If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.
            >>
            >> I wonder if there's another alternative.
            >>
            >> Jamie
            >>
            >> On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
            >>
            >>> I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about little sandwiches.
            >>>
            >>> I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp (chip) or peanut or two.
            >>>
            >>> Valerie
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>> On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
            >>>> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
            >>>> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
            >>>>
            >>>> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
            >>>> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms, etc.
            >>>>
            >>>> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
            >>>> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
            >>>> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
            >>>>
            >>>> Any opinions on this?
            >>>>
            >>>> Jamie
            >>>>
            >>>>
            >>>> _______________________________________________
            >>>> Czechlist mailing list
            >>>> Czechlist@...
            >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >>>
            >>>
            >>> _______________________________________________
            >>> Czechlist mailing list
            >>> Czechlist@...
            >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >>
            >>
            >> _______________________________________________
            >> Czechlist mailing list
            >> Czechlist@...
            >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >>
            >
            > _______________________________________________
            > Czechlist mailing list
            > Czechlist@...
            > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


            _______________________________________________
            Czechlist mailing list
            Czechlist@...
            http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          • (no author)
            You ll probably go on another no one this side of Atlantic says/understand this trip, Jamie, but AFAIK gig is a musical event/performance from both the
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
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              You'll probably go on another 'no one this side of Atlantic
              says/understand this' trip, Jamie, but AFAIK gig is a musical
              event/performance from both the audience's and the performer's point of
              view in Brit Eng..

              So a musician has a gig at this or that place.. a music fan goes to
              gigs, is going to this or that gig, etc. Not sure if I ever heard it
              used for fans in the US (live or in media), so not going to argue with
              you, in fact, not going to argue with you period, but come on it's not
              that difficult to *suss out*, is it?

              And BTW gigs do not normally apply to symphony concerts (at least on
              the audience side, must be a class thing..)

              Sorry, couldn't resist * * :)

              M


              ------ Original Message ------
              From: "James Kirchner" <czechlist@...>
              To: czechlist@...
              Sent: 4.4.2013 13:42:09
              Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
              > The survey ranked me as "Established Middle Class", which was the
              >class right below "Elite". But, of course, this is in the mentality of
              >a nation that's hyper-sensitive to social class or even the mention of
              >it. I've mentioned socio-economic class from the American point of
              >view, as something that just exists, doesn't make people better or
              >worse and that people routinely move in or out of, and had Brits freak
              >out as if I were mentioning something obscene. It took me a while to
              >figure out why they were sensitive.
              >
              >I didn't understand what "go to gigs" meant, because a gig is a job,
              >or more specifically a job a musician is hired for. When my sister
              >plays, it's a gig to her, but it's a symphony concert to the attendees.
              >
              >Thank you for the suggestions, Gerry.
              >
              >Jamie
              >
              >On Apr 4, 2013, at 7:27 AM, wustpisk wrote:
              >
              >> It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose.
              >>
              >> First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973
              >>
              >> and then decide whether you want to call them finger foods, canapes,
              >hors d'oeuvres, light snacks, antipasti, amuse-bouche, whatever.
              >>
              >> I agree that 'finger foods' sounds very slightly odd, but it
              >wouldn't cause me to complain.
              >> Personally I would plump for canapes, but even that conjures up an
              >image of Delboy Trotter bringing in a tray of jam sarnies.
              >>
              >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
              >>>
              >>> There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never
              >understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that
              >understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of
              >situations like receptions where you have people walking around with
              >trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would
              >never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food",
              >because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers
              >or, worse yet, of people fingering food.
              >>>
              >>> If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the
              >Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an
              >image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call
              >hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian
              >dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in
              >that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the
              >hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in
              >the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.
              >>>
              >>> I wonder if there's another alternative.
              >>>
              >>> Jamie
              >>>
              >>> On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
              >>>
              >>>> I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres
              >are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the
              >fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet
              >food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be
              >canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about
              >little sandwiches.
              >>>>
              >>>> I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the
              >kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly
              >context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the
              >weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not
              >really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from
              >the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're
              >not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp
              >(chip) or peanut or two.
              >>>>
              >>>> Valerie
              >>>>
              >>>>
              >>>>
              >>>> On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
              >>>>> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
              >>>>> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
              >>>>>
              >>>>> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
              >>>>> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms,
              >etc.
              >>>>>
              >>>>> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
              >>>>> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
              >>>>> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
              >>>>>
              >>>>> Any opinions on this?
              >>>>>
              >>>>> Jamie
              >>>>>
              >>>>>
              >>>>> _______________________________________________
              >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
              >>>>> Czechlist@...
              >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >>>>
              >>>>
              >>>> _______________________________________________
              >>>> Czechlist mailing list
              >>>> Czechlist@...
              >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >>>
              >>>
              >>> _______________________________________________
              >>> Czechlist mailing list
              >>> Czechlist@...
              >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >>>
              >>
              >> _______________________________________________
              >> Czechlist mailing list
              >> Czechlist@...
              >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >
              >_______________________________________________
              >Czechlist mailing list
              >Czechlist@...
              >http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • James Kirchner
              I think the meaning of gig must have expanded on your side of the ocean, because here the audience definitely doesn t call it a gig, as far as I know.
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
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                I think the meaning of "gig" must have expanded on your side of the ocean, because here the audience definitely doesn't call it a gig, as far as I know.

                Symphony musicians here refer to their jobs as gigs just the way jazz or rock musicians would, but this doesn't penetrate the wall into the terminology used by the audience. If she's talking to me or her musician friends, she'll say she's doing a gig, but to an outsider she might say she's playing a concert.

                Jamie

                On Apr 4, 2013, at 9:14 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

                > You'll probably go on another 'no one this side of Atlantic
                > says/understand this' trip, Jamie, but AFAIK gig is a musical
                > event/performance from both the audience's and the performer's point of
                > view in Brit Eng..
                >
                > So a musician has a gig at this or that place.. a music fan goes to
                > gigs, is going to this or that gig, etc. Not sure if I ever heard it
                > used for fans in the US (live or in media), so not going to argue with
                > you, in fact, not going to argue with you period, but come on it's not
                > that difficult to *suss out*, is it?
                >
                > And BTW gigs do not normally apply to symphony concerts (at least on
                > the audience side, must be a class thing..)
                >
                > Sorry, couldn't resist * * :)
                >
                > M
                >
                >
                > ------ Original Message ------
                > From: "James Kirchner" <czechlist@...>
                > To: czechlist@...
                > Sent: 4.4.2013 13:42:09
                > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
                >> The survey ranked me as "Established Middle Class", which was the
                >> class right below "Elite". But, of course, this is in the mentality of
                >> a nation that's hyper-sensitive to social class or even the mention of
                >> it. I've mentioned socio-economic class from the American point of
                >> view, as something that just exists, doesn't make people better or
                >> worse and that people routinely move in or out of, and had Brits freak
                >> out as if I were mentioning something obscene. It took me a while to
                >> figure out why they were sensitive.
                >>
                >> I didn't understand what "go to gigs" meant, because a gig is a job,
                >> or more specifically a job a musician is hired for. When my sister
                >> plays, it's a gig to her, but it's a symphony concert to the attendees.
                >>
                >> Thank you for the suggestions, Gerry.
                >>
                >> Jamie
                >>
                >> On Apr 4, 2013, at 7:27 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                >>
                >>> It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose.
                >>>
                >>> First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973
                >>>
                >>> and then decide whether you want to call them finger foods, canapes,
                >> hors d'oeuvres, light snacks, antipasti, amuse-bouche, whatever.
                >>>
                >>> I agree that 'finger foods' sounds very slightly odd, but it
                >> wouldn't cause me to complain.
                >>> Personally I would plump for canapes, but even that conjures up an
                >> image of Delboy Trotter bringing in a tray of jam sarnies.
                >>>
                >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                >>>>
                >>>> There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never
                >> understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that
                >> understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of
                >> situations like receptions where you have people walking around with
                >> trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would
                >> never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food",
                >> because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers
                >> or, worse yet, of people fingering food.
                >>>>
                >>>> If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the
                >> Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an
                >> image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call
                >> hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian
                >> dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in
                >> that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the
                >> hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in
                >> the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.
                >>>>
                >>>> I wonder if there's another alternative.
                >>>>
                >>>> Jamie
                >>>>
                >>>> On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                >>>>
                >>>>> I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres
                >> are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the
                >> fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet
                >> food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be
                >> canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about
                >> little sandwiches.
                >>>>>
                >>>>> I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the
                >> kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly
                >> context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the
                >> weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not
                >> really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from
                >> the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're
                >> not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp
                >> (chip) or peanut or two.
                >>>>>
                >>>>> Valerie
                >>>>>
                >>>>>
                >>>>>
                >>>>> On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
                >>>>>> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
                >>>>>> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
                >>>>>>
                >>>>>> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
                >>>>>> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms,
                >> etc.
                >>>>>>
                >>>>>> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
                >>>>>> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
                >>>>>> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
                >>>>>>
                >>>>>> Any opinions on this?
                >>>>>>
                >>>>>> Jamie
                >>>>>>
                >>>>>>
                >>>>>> _______________________________________________
                >>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                >>>>>> Czechlist@...
                >>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >>>>>
                >>>>>
                >>>>> _______________________________________________
                >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                >>>>> Czechlist@...
                >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >>>>
                >>>>
                >>>> _______________________________________________
                >>>> Czechlist mailing list
                >>>> Czechlist@...
                >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >>>>
                >>>
                >>> _______________________________________________
                >>> Czechlist mailing list
                >>> Czechlist@...
                >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >>
                >> _______________________________________________
                >> Czechlist mailing list
                >> Czechlist@...
                >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >>
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > _______________________________________________
                > Czechlist mailing list
                > Czechlist@...
                > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


                _______________________________________________
                Czechlist mailing list
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                http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              • Kent Christopher Kasha
                In Canada when you say you are going to a gig then it is understood that you are going to be one of the musicians playing. It doesn t necessarily have to be a
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  In Canada when you say you are going to a gig then it is understood that you
                  are going to be one of the musicians playing. It doesn't necessarily have to
                  be a job, though it usually is. I played a lot of gigs where I wasn't paid a
                  cent (in the best cases I didn't have to pay for the beer I drank). And it
                  doesn't have to even mean there is a performance involved. Making an album
                  as a session musician is just as much a gig as playing on a smokey jazz club
                  stage.



                  From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  Of James Kirchner
                  Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2013 3:23 PM
                  To: czechlist@...
                  Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food





                  I think the meaning of "gig" must have expanded on your side of the ocean,
                  because here the audience definitely doesn't call it a gig, as far as I
                  know.

                  Symphony musicians here refer to their jobs as gigs just the way jazz or
                  rock musicians would, but this doesn't penetrate the wall into the
                  terminology used by the audience. If she's talking to me or her musician
                  friends, she'll say she's doing a gig, but to an outsider she might say
                  she's playing a concert.

                  Jamie

                  On Apr 4, 2013, at 9:14 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

                  > You'll probably go on another 'no one this side of Atlantic
                  > says/understand this' trip, Jamie, but AFAIK gig is a musical
                  > event/performance from both the audience's and the performer's point of
                  > view in Brit Eng..
                  >
                  > So a musician has a gig at this or that place.. a music fan goes to
                  > gigs, is going to this or that gig, etc. Not sure if I ever heard it
                  > used for fans in the US (live or in media), so not going to argue with
                  > you, in fact, not going to argue with you period, but come on it's not
                  > that difficult to *suss out*, is it?
                  >
                  > And BTW gigs do not normally apply to symphony concerts (at least on
                  > the audience side, must be a class thing..)
                  >
                  > Sorry, couldn't resist * * :)
                  >
                  > M
                  >
                  >
                  > ------ Original Message ------
                  > From: "James Kirchner" <czechlist@...
                  <mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org> >
                  > To: czechlist@... <mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                  > Sent: 4.4.2013 13:42:09
                  > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
                  >> The survey ranked me as "Established Middle Class", which was the
                  >> class right below "Elite". But, of course, this is in the mentality of
                  >> a nation that's hyper-sensitive to social class or even the mention of
                  >> it. I've mentioned socio-economic class from the American point of
                  >> view, as something that just exists, doesn't make people better or
                  >> worse and that people routinely move in or out of, and had Brits freak
                  >> out as if I were mentioning something obscene. It took me a while to
                  >> figure out why they were sensitive.
                  >>
                  >> I didn't understand what "go to gigs" meant, because a gig is a job,
                  >> or more specifically a job a musician is hired for. When my sister
                  >> plays, it's a gig to her, but it's a symphony concert to the attendees.
                  >>
                  >> Thank you for the suggestions, Gerry.
                  >>
                  >> Jamie
                  >>
                  >> On Apr 4, 2013, at 7:27 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                  >>
                  >>> It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose.
                  >>>
                  >>> First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973
                  >>>
                  >>> and then decide whether you want to call them finger foods, canapes,
                  >> hors d'oeuvres, light snacks, antipasti, amuse-bouche, whatever.
                  >>>
                  >>> I agree that 'finger foods' sounds very slightly odd, but it
                  >> wouldn't cause me to complain.
                  >>> Personally I would plump for canapes, but even that conjures up an
                  >> image of Delboy Trotter bringing in a tray of jam sarnies.
                  >>>
                  >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                  James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                  >>>>
                  >>>> There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never
                  >> understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that
                  >> understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of
                  >> situations like receptions where you have people walking around with
                  >> trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would
                  >> never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food",
                  >> because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers
                  >> or, worse yet, of people fingering food.
                  >>>>
                  >>>> If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the
                  >> Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an
                  >> image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call
                  >> hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian
                  >> dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in
                  >> that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the
                  >> hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in
                  >> the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.
                  >>>>
                  >>>> I wonder if there's another alternative.
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Jamie
                  >>>>
                  >>>> On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                  >>>>
                  >>>>> I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres
                  >> are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the
                  >> fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet
                  >> food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be
                  >> canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about
                  >> little sandwiches.
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the
                  >> kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly
                  >> context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the
                  >> weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not
                  >> really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from
                  >> the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're
                  >> not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp
                  >> (chip) or peanut or two.
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> Valerie
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
                  >>>>>> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
                  >>>>>> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
                  >>>>>>
                  >>>>>> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
                  >>>>>> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms,
                  >> etc.
                  >>>>>>
                  >>>>>> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
                  >>>>>> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
                  >>>>>> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
                  >>>>>>
                  >>>>>> Any opinions on this?
                  >>>>>>
                  >>>>>> Jamie
                  >>>>>>
                  >>>>>>
                  >>>>>> _______________________________________________
                  >>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                  >>>>>> Czechlist@...
                  >>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> _______________________________________________
                  >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                  >>>>> Czechlist@...
                  >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>> _______________________________________________
                  >>>> Czechlist mailing list
                  >>>> Czechlist@...
                  >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>>>
                  >>>
                  >>> _______________________________________________
                  >>> Czechlist mailing list
                  >>> Czechlist@... <mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                  >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>
                  >> _______________________________________________
                  >> Czechlist mailing list
                  >> Czechlist@... <mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                  >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > _______________________________________________
                  > Czechlist mailing list
                  > Czechlist@... <mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                  > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist

                  _______________________________________________
                  Czechlist mailing list
                  Czechlist@... <mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                  http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • James Kirchner
                  That s how we use it. Jamie ... _______________________________________________ Czechlist mailing list Czechlist@czechlist.org
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    That's how we use it.

                    Jamie

                    On Apr 4, 2013, at 12:01 PM, Kent Christopher Kasha wrote:

                    > In Canada when you say you are going to a gig then it is understood that you
                    > are going to be one of the musicians playing. It doesn't necessarily have to
                    > be a job, though it usually is. I played a lot of gigs where I wasn't paid a
                    > cent (in the best cases I didn't have to pay for the beer I drank). And it
                    > doesn't have to even mean there is a performance involved. Making an album
                    > as a session musician is just as much a gig as playing on a smokey jazz club
                    > stage.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    > Of James Kirchner
                    > Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2013 3:23 PM
                    > To: czechlist@...
                    > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I think the meaning of "gig" must have expanded on your side of the ocean,
                    > because here the audience definitely doesn't call it a gig, as far as I
                    > know.
                    >
                    > Symphony musicians here refer to their jobs as gigs just the way jazz or
                    > rock musicians would, but this doesn't penetrate the wall into the
                    > terminology used by the audience. If she's talking to me or her musician
                    > friends, she'll say she's doing a gig, but to an outsider she might say
                    > she's playing a concert.
                    >
                    > Jamie
                    >
                    > On Apr 4, 2013, at 9:14 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
                    >
                    >> You'll probably go on another 'no one this side of Atlantic
                    >> says/understand this' trip, Jamie, but AFAIK gig is a musical
                    >> event/performance from both the audience's and the performer's point of
                    >> view in Brit Eng..
                    >>
                    >> So a musician has a gig at this or that place.. a music fan goes to
                    >> gigs, is going to this or that gig, etc. Not sure if I ever heard it
                    >> used for fans in the US (live or in media), so not going to argue with
                    >> you, in fact, not going to argue with you period, but come on it's not
                    >> that difficult to *suss out*, is it?
                    >>
                    >> And BTW gigs do not normally apply to symphony concerts (at least on
                    >> the audience side, must be a class thing..)
                    >>
                    >> Sorry, couldn't resist * * :)
                    >>
                    >> M
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> ------ Original Message ------
                    >> From: "James Kirchner" <czechlist@...
                    > <mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org> >
                    >> To: czechlist@... <mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                    >> Sent: 4.4.2013 13:42:09
                    >> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
                    >>> The survey ranked me as "Established Middle Class", which was the
                    >>> class right below "Elite". But, of course, this is in the mentality of
                    >>> a nation that's hyper-sensitive to social class or even the mention of
                    >>> it. I've mentioned socio-economic class from the American point of
                    >>> view, as something that just exists, doesn't make people better or
                    >>> worse and that people routinely move in or out of, and had Brits freak
                    >>> out as if I were mentioning something obscene. It took me a while to
                    >>> figure out why they were sensitive.
                    >>>
                    >>> I didn't understand what "go to gigs" meant, because a gig is a job,
                    >>> or more specifically a job a musician is hired for. When my sister
                    >>> plays, it's a gig to her, but it's a symphony concert to the attendees.
                    >>>
                    >>> Thank you for the suggestions, Gerry.
                    >>>
                    >>> Jamie
                    >>>
                    >>> On Apr 4, 2013, at 7:27 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                    >>>
                    >>>> It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose.
                    >>>>
                    >>>> First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973
                    >>>>
                    >>>> and then decide whether you want to call them finger foods, canapes,
                    >>> hors d'oeuvres, light snacks, antipasti, amuse-bouche, whatever.
                    >>>>
                    >>>> I agree that 'finger foods' sounds very slightly odd, but it
                    >>> wouldn't cause me to complain.
                    >>>> Personally I would plump for canapes, but even that conjures up an
                    >>> image of Delboy Trotter bringing in a tray of jam sarnies.
                    >>>>
                    >>>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                    > James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never
                    >>> understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that
                    >>> understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of
                    >>> situations like receptions where you have people walking around with
                    >>> trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would
                    >>> never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food",
                    >>> because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers
                    >>> or, worse yet, of people fingering food.
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the
                    >>> Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an
                    >>> image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call
                    >>> hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian
                    >>> dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in
                    >>> that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the
                    >>> hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in
                    >>> the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> I wonder if there's another alternative.
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> Jamie
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>>> I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres
                    >>> are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the
                    >>> fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet
                    >>> food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be
                    >>> canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about
                    >>> little sandwiches.
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>> I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the
                    >>> kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly
                    >>> context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the
                    >>> weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not
                    >>> really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from
                    >>> the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're
                    >>> not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp
                    >>> (chip) or peanut or two.
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>> Valerie
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>> On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
                    >>>>>>> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
                    >>>>>>> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
                    >>>>>>>
                    >>>>>>> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
                    >>>>>>> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms,
                    >>> etc.
                    >>>>>>>
                    >>>>>>> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
                    >>>>>>> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
                    >>>>>>> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
                    >>>>>>>
                    >>>>>>> Any opinions on this?
                    >>>>>>>
                    >>>>>>> Jamie
                    >>>>>>>
                    >>>>>>>
                    >>>>>>> _______________________________________________
                    >>>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                    >>>>>>> Czechlist@...
                    >>>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>> _______________________________________________
                    >>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                    >>>>>> Czechlist@...
                    >>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> _______________________________________________
                    >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                    >>>>> Czechlist@...
                    >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>
                    >>>> _______________________________________________
                    >>>> Czechlist mailing list
                    >>>> Czechlist@... <mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                    >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >>>
                    >>> _______________________________________________
                    >>> Czechlist mailing list
                    >>> Czechlist@... <mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                    >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >>>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >>
                    >> _______________________________________________
                    >> Czechlist mailing list
                    >> Czechlist@... <mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                    >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Czechlist mailing list
                    > Czechlist@... <mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                    > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Czechlist mailing list
                    > Czechlist@...
                    > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


                    _______________________________________________
                    Czechlist mailing list
                    Czechlist@...
                    http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  • wustpisk
                    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=7UIjVGcSe8MC&pg=PA288&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=7UIjVGcSe8MC&pg=PA288&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false


                      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Kent Christopher Kasha" <kasha@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > In Canada when you say you are going to a gig then it is understood that you
                      > are going to be one of the musicians playing. It doesn't necessarily have to
                      > be a job, though it usually is. I played a lot of gigs where I wasn't paid a
                      > cent (in the best cases I didn't have to pay for the beer I drank). And it
                      > doesn't have to even mean there is a performance involved. Making an album
                      > as a session musician is just as much a gig as playing on a smokey jazz club
                      > stage.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      > Of James Kirchner
                      > Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2013 3:23 PM
                      > To: czechlist@...
                      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I think the meaning of "gig" must have expanded on your side of the ocean,
                      > because here the audience definitely doesn't call it a gig, as far as I
                      > know.
                      >
                      > Symphony musicians here refer to their jobs as gigs just the way jazz or
                      > rock musicians would, but this doesn't penetrate the wall into the
                      > terminology used by the audience. If she's talking to me or her musician
                      > friends, she'll say she's doing a gig, but to an outsider she might say
                      > she's playing a concert.
                      >
                      > Jamie
                      >
                      > On Apr 4, 2013, at 9:14 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
                      >
                      > > You'll probably go on another 'no one this side of Atlantic
                      > > says/understand this' trip, Jamie, but AFAIK gig is a musical
                      > > event/performance from both the audience's and the performer's point of
                      > > view in Brit Eng..
                      > >
                      > > So a musician has a gig at this or that place.. a music fan goes to
                      > > gigs, is going to this or that gig, etc. Not sure if I ever heard it
                      > > used for fans in the US (live or in media), so not going to argue with
                      > > you, in fact, not going to argue with you period, but come on it's not
                      > > that difficult to *suss out*, is it?
                      > >
                      > > And BTW gigs do not normally apply to symphony concerts (at least on
                      > > the audience side, must be a class thing..)
                      > >
                      > > Sorry, couldn't resist * * :)
                      > >
                      > > M
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ------ Original Message ------
                      > > From: "James Kirchner" <czechlist@...
                      > <mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org> >
                      > > To: czechlist@... <mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org>
                      > > Sent: 4.4.2013 13:42:09
                      > > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Finger food
                      > >> The survey ranked me as "Established Middle Class", which was the
                      > >> class right below "Elite". But, of course, this is in the mentality of
                      > >> a nation that's hyper-sensitive to social class or even the mention of
                      > >> it. I've mentioned socio-economic class from the American point of
                      > >> view, as something that just exists, doesn't make people better or
                      > >> worse and that people routinely move in or out of, and had Brits freak
                      > >> out as if I were mentioning something obscene. It took me a while to
                      > >> figure out why they were sensitive.
                      > >>
                      > >> I didn't understand what "go to gigs" meant, because a gig is a job,
                      > >> or more specifically a job a musician is hired for. When my sister
                      > >> plays, it's a gig to her, but it's a symphony concert to the attendees.
                      > >>
                      > >> Thank you for the suggestions, Gerry.
                      > >>
                      > >> Jamie
                      > >>
                      > >> On Apr 4, 2013, at 7:27 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >>> It depends on how cultured you are, I suppose.
                      > >>>
                      > >>> First take the test http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22000973
                      > >>>
                      > >>> and then decide whether you want to call them finger foods, canapes,
                      > >> hors d'oeuvres, light snacks, antipasti, amuse-bouche, whatever.
                      > >>>
                      > >>> I agree that 'finger foods' sounds very slightly odd, but it
                      > >> wouldn't cause me to complain.
                      > >>> Personally I would plump for canapes, but even that conjures up an
                      > >> image of Delboy Trotter bringing in a tray of jam sarnies.
                      > >>>
                      > >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                      > James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> There must be a cultural thing going on here, because I have never
                      > >> understood hors d'oeuvres to be part of a meal. I see that
                      > >> understanding of them in Wikipedia, but what, then, do I make of
                      > >> situations like receptions where you have people walking around with
                      > >> trays of hors d'oeuvres and there's no meal being served? We would
                      > >> never refer to classy little delectables like that as "finger food",
                      > >> because it still conjures the image of babies eating goldfish crackers
                      > >> or, worse yet, of people fingering food.
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> If I look up "finger food" in Wikipedia, they say that in the
                      > >> Western world finger foods are often hors d'oeuvres. Then it shows an
                      > >> image of someone carrying a tray around and serving what we would call
                      > >> hors d'oeuvres. What's more, the article says that typical Ethiopian
                      > >> dishes are "finger foods", but I definitely wouldn't think of them in
                      > >> that category. They would be something like "food eaten with the
                      > >> hands". Under the definition, fried chicken would be finger food in
                      > >> the United States, but that's too substantial to be finger food.
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> I wonder if there's another alternative.
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> Jamie
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>> On Apr 4, 2013, at 4:26 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                      > >>>>
                      > >>>>> I would stick with finger food for this, because hors d'oeuvres
                      > >> are usually part of a meal and aren't necessarily eaten with the
                      > >> fingers, whereas finger food is indeed very commonly used for buffet
                      > >> food etc. that's eaten with the fingers. Some of them might be
                      > >> canapes, but that's pretty specific and they may be talking more about
                      > >> little sandwiches.
                      > >>>>>
                      > >>>>> I think it's clear from the context that it's not referring to the
                      > >> kind of finger food given to babies - that use of the term is fairly
                      > >> context-specific, e.g. when used in parenting books talking about the
                      > >> weaning process. By the time they're over about 14 months it's not
                      > >> really even referred to as finger food, just food. And I think from
                      > >> the context it would also probably be reasonably clear that they're
                      > >> not talking about cheese puffs :) although there could be a crisp
                      > >> (chip) or peanut or two.
                      > >>>>>
                      > >>>>> Valerie
                      > >>>>>
                      > >>>>>
                      > >>>>>
                      > >>>>> On 04.04.2013 05:19, James Kirchner wrote:
                      > >>>>>> I think I'm running into another English word that Europeans have
                      > >>>>>> learned and gone crazy with in their own languages.
                      > >>>>>>
                      > >>>>>> There's an elegant hotel advertising that they serve "finger food"
                      > >>>>>> all over the place -- at elegant buffets, in the premium rooms,
                      > >> etc.
                      > >>>>>>
                      > >>>>>> For this grub, I'd prefer to say "hors d'oeuvres", because "finger
                      > >>>>>> food" can also mean cheese puffs and other lowbrow snacks, or even
                      > >>>>>> Cheerios or other cereal given to toddlers.
                      > >>>>>>
                      > >>>>>> Any opinions on this?
                      > >>>>>>
                      > >>>>>> Jamie
                      > >>>>>>
                      > >>>>>>
                      > >>>>>> _______________________________________________
                      > >>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                      > >>>>>> Czechlist@
                      > >>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      > >>>>>
                      > >>>>>
                      > >>>>> _______________________________________________
                      > >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                      > >>>>> Czechlist@
                      > >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      > >>>>
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