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Re: [Czechlist] REVISITED: Zamereni

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  • Charles Stanford
    Give it a break Jamie ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 20 , Mar 30, 2013
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      Give it a break Jamie


      On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      >
      > On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
      >
      > > You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist subject"
      > is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist subject
      > degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses, specialist
      > interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college (my old
      > grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found on UK
      > (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
      > bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
      > > http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
      >
      > Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
      >
      >
      > > So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say it
      > sounds mighty Czech.
      > >
      > > But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see the
      > funny side eventually.
      >
      > At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers don't
      > understand my state's localisms, which is something that British on this
      > list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is "British
      > slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native speakers,
      > and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people of all
      > ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare blankly and
      > have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed electricians
      > don't understand.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      >
      > _______________________________________________
      > Czechlist mailing list
      > Czechlist@...
      > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • wustpisk
      (where s the like button on this thing?)
      Message 2 of 20 , Mar 30, 2013
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        (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)

        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford <charliestanfordtranslations@...> wrote:
        >
        > Give it a break Jamie
        >
        >
        > On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
        > >
        > > > You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist subject"
        > > is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist subject
        > > degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses, specialist
        > > interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college (my old
        > > grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found on UK
        > > (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
        > > bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
        > > > http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
        > >
        > > Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
        > >
        > >
        > > > So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say it
        > > sounds mighty Czech.
        > > >
        > > > But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see the
        > > funny side eventually.
        > >
        > > At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers don't
        > > understand my state's localisms, which is something that British on this
        > > list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is "British
        > > slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native speakers,
        > > and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people of all
        > > ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare blankly and
        > > have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed electricians-
        > > don't understand.
        > >
        > > Jamie
        > >
        > >
        > > _______________________________________________
        > > Czechlist mailing list
        > > Czechlist@...
        > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • James Kirchner
        ... Since it was unfamiliar, and since it sounded to me like awkward translations of odborny (remember that I have to deal with a lot of crappy TM, some from
        Message 3 of 20 , Mar 30, 2013
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          On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:

          > So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say it sounds mighty Czech.

          Since it was unfamiliar, and since it sounded to me like awkward translations of "odborny" (remember that I have to deal with a lot of crappy TM, some from native English speakers who have lost their cit pro anglictinu), it is understandable that I would be cautious of it and suspect mild Czenglish.

          The curious thing about these exchanges is the way the British appear to be so unable to perceive when I am hedging a statement. For example, if I say something SOUNDS mighty Czech TO ME, a Brit will perceive me as having said something like, "This is Czech." All I can think is that the Brits on the list even hedge things they feel strongly about, so when an American hedges something, they think he's not hedging.

          > But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see the funny side eventually.

          You guys have your comical side also. Here's how it usually goes:

          1. I say, "I like Mr. Brit's suggestions 1, 2 and 3, but suggestion 4 would not be understood in North America."
          2. Some Brit gets insulted at the mere suggestion that any British localism may not be universal.
          3. The Brit cherry picks rare instances where the term is has been used in some American source. The Brit can't perceive, but Americans can, that these involve an American journalist trying to look superior by using a British term that his readers will find obscure. (This does happen.)
          4. I check around and make a reasonably good case that even reasonably well-read Americans don't understand the term.
          5. The Brit sends back a link to a BBC report saying that people in Mississippi are fat and stupid and therefore don't support Obamacare, or any irrelevant BBC report claiming that Americans are stupid.

          Jamie

          _______________________________________________
          Czechlist mailing list
          Czechlist@...
          http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        • James Kirchner
          No. ... _______________________________________________ Czechlist mailing list Czechlist@czechlist.org
          Message 4 of 20 , Mar 30, 2013
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            No.

            On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:10 PM, Charles Stanford wrote:

            > Give it a break Jamie
            >
            >
            > On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
            >
            >> **
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
            >>
            >>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist subject"
            >> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist subject
            >> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses, specialist
            >> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college (my old
            >> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found on UK
            >> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
            >> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
            >>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
            >>
            >> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
            >>
            >>
            >>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say it
            >> sounds mighty Czech.
            >>>
            >>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see the
            >> funny side eventually.
            >>
            >> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers don't
            >> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British on this
            >> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is "British
            >> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native speakers,
            >> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people of all
            >> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare blankly and
            >> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed electricians
            >> don't understand.
            >>
            >> Jamie
            >>
            >>
            >> _______________________________________________
            >> Czechlist mailing list
            >> Czechlist@...
            >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > _______________________________________________
            > Czechlist mailing list
            > Czechlist@...
            > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


            _______________________________________________
            Czechlist mailing list
            Czechlist@...
            http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          • James Kirchner
            There s no Like button, so you have to contribute an arrogant statement. JK ... _______________________________________________ Czechlist mailing list
            Message 5 of 20 , Mar 30, 2013
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              There's no "Like" button, so you have to contribute an arrogant statement.

              JK

              On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:22 PM, wustpisk wrote:

              >
              > (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)
              >
              > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford <charliestanfordtranslations@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> Give it a break Jamie
              >>
              >>
              >> On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
              >>
              >>> **
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
              >>>
              >>>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist subject"
              >>> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist subject
              >>> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses, specialist
              >>> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college (my old
              >>> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found on UK
              >>> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
              >>> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
              >>>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
              >>>
              >>> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say it
              >>> sounds mighty Czech.
              >>>>
              >>>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see the
              >>> funny side eventually.
              >>>
              >>> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers don't
              >>> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British on this
              >>> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is "British
              >>> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native speakers,
              >>> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people of all
              >>> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare blankly and
              >>> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed electricians-
              >>> don't understand.
              >>>
              >>> Jamie
              >>>
              >>>
              >>> _______________________________________________
              >>> Czechlist mailing list
              >>> Czechlist@...
              >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >>>
              >>>
              >>>
              >>
              >>
              >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>
              >
              >
              > _______________________________________________
              > Czechlist mailing list
              > Czechlist@...
              > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


              _______________________________________________
              Czechlist mailing list
              Czechlist@...
              http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            • wustpisk
              OK http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/29/10-things-americans-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-brits/ (the picture is quite apt :) )
              Message 6 of 20 , Mar 30, 2013
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                OK

                http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/29/10-things-americans-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-brits/

                (the picture is quite apt :) )

                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                >
                > There's no "Like" button, so you have to contribute an arrogant statement.
                >
                > JK
                >
                > On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:22 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                >
                > >
                > > (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)
                > >
                > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford <charliestanfordtranslations@> wrote:
                > >>
                > >> Give it a break Jamie
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                > >>
                > >>> **
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
                > >>>
                > >>>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist subject"
                > >>> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist subject
                > >>> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses, specialist
                > >>> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college (my old
                > >>> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found on UK
                > >>> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
                > >>> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
                > >>>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
                > >>>
                > >>> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say it
                > >>> sounds mighty Czech.
                > >>>>
                > >>>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see the
                > >>> funny side eventually.
                > >>>
                > >>> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers don't
                > >>> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British on this
                > >>> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is "British
                > >>> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native speakers,
                > >>> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people of all
                > >>> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare blankly and
                > >>> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed electricians-
                > >>> don't understand.
                > >>>
                > >>> Jamie
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>> _______________________________________________
                > >>> Czechlist mailing list
                > >>> Czechlist@
                > >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > > _______________________________________________
                > > Czechlist mailing list
                > > Czechlist@...
                > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >
                >
                > _______________________________________________
                > Czechlist mailing list
                > Czechlist@...
                > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >
              • James Kirchner
                At least the BBC was balanced in this case, also running an article on offensive British behavior:
                Message 7 of 20 , Mar 31, 2013
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                  At least the BBC was balanced in this case, also running an article on offensive British behavior:
                  http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/24/10-things-brits-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-americans/

                  Comments on the Americans offensive to Brits article:

                  No offering to buy a round
                  Americans buy rounds in certain types of situations and not in others. When you've got three or four good friends sitting there, and they're not going to be drinking gallons and gallons, Americans often buy rounds. If the group consists of the full cast of The Ten Commandments, most of whom are strangers, and they're all alcoholics, an American will want separate bills.

                  Taking our plates away
                  Americans don't like the clutter of empty plates, and they'd rather have it all cleared away and just sit there with their drink, dessert, or whatever. It's no judgement about the speed of anyone's eating, so the Brit's too paranoid here.

                  Talking in the cinema
                  I don't know any American who is not offended by people talking in the movie theater, except for the people who are talking. However, the fact that the Brit just sits there and endures it shows he lacks the spine to tell the people to shut up. Most of them will. If they don't, you get the usher or manager to tell them to shut up or to kick them out.

                  Making introductions
                  Why are the Brits so unfriendly that they won't introduce themselves?

                  Therapy talk
                  I don't know any American who will blather on about his therapy, because that's a private matter. Whoever wrote this article must have been spending all his time around rich secular people in the East, who have the money to pay for a therapist as recreation and doesn't go to a church or synagogue. Maybe he just got this from old Woody Allen movies. Most Americans only get therapy if something serious is wrong (and often not even then).

                  Describing something as "quite good"
                  The fact that his is even an issue shows that the Brits must have been using the expression insincerely for so long that the meaning changed. Something like saying, "Well, done!" to mean everything from, "Well, done!" to, "You botched it!" Very Japanese.

                  Complaining
                  If someone is being cheated, taken advantage of, receiving bad service, etc., he deserves to have the situation remedied in the moment. It's kind of despicable to say nothing at the time and then go gossip about it later. This is why John Cleese couldn't get a refund for the dead parrot. In fact, the complaining may be benevolent, because the establishment may be unaware of the problem and will WANT to fix it.

                  Over-politeness
                  Most Americans could do without the greeters at the doors of Walmart or Meijer's, but there's nothing wrong with asking if someone needs help or information. Often they do. Many Europeans tend to think it's over-polite to be spoken to at all, as did a German I met who got angry because a waitress making her rounds routinely asked just once if he wanted his coffee cup refilled (free of charge). One German even went so far as to tell me that if a customer can't find something, "That's his problem!" and that the staff shouldn't speak to him or offer to help.

                  Jamie

                  On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:57 PM, wustpisk wrote:

                  > OK
                  >
                  > http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/29/10-things-americans-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-brits/
                  >
                  > (the picture is quite apt :) )
                  >
                  > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> There's no "Like" button, so you have to contribute an arrogant statement.
                  >>
                  >> JK
                  >>
                  >> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:22 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                  >>
                  >>>
                  >>> (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)
                  >>>
                  >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford <charliestanfordtranslations@> wrote:
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Give it a break Jamie
                  >>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>> On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                  >>>>
                  >>>>> **
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist subject"
                  >>>>> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist subject
                  >>>>> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses, specialist
                  >>>>> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college (my old
                  >>>>> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found on UK
                  >>>>> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
                  >>>>> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
                  >>>>>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say it
                  >>>>> sounds mighty Czech.
                  >>>>>>
                  >>>>>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see the
                  >>>>> funny side eventually.
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers don't
                  >>>>> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British on this
                  >>>>> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is "British
                  >>>>> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native speakers,
                  >>>>> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people of all
                  >>>>> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare blankly and
                  >>>>> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed electricians-
                  >>>>> don't understand.
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> Jamie
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> _______________________________________________
                  >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                  >>>>> Czechlist@
                  >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >>>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> _______________________________________________
                  >>> Czechlist mailing list
                  >>> Czechlist@...
                  >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> _______________________________________________
                  >> Czechlist mailing list
                  >> Czechlist@...
                  >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>
                  >
                  > _______________________________________________
                  > Czechlist mailing list
                  > Czechlist@...
                  > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


                  _______________________________________________
                  Czechlist mailing list
                  Czechlist@...
                  http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                • wustpisk
                  I saw this and I thought of you - maybe you ought to invest in some :) http://m.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/apr/01/guardian-goggles-augmented-reality-specs
                  Message 8 of 20 , Apr 1, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I saw this and I thought of you - maybe you ought to invest in some :) http://m.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/apr/01/guardian-goggles-augmented-reality-specs

                    --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > At least the BBC was balanced in this case, also running an article on offensive British behavior:
                    > http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/24/10-things-brits-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-americans/
                    >
                    > Comments on the Americans offensive to Brits article:
                    >
                    > No offering to buy a round
                    > Americans buy rounds in certain types of situations and not in others. When you've got three or four good friends sitting there, and they're not going to be drinking gallons and gallons, Americans often buy rounds. If the group consists of the full cast of The Ten Commandments, most of whom are strangers, and they're all alcoholics, an American will want separate bills.
                    >
                    > Taking our plates away
                    > Americans don't like the clutter of empty plates, and they'd rather have it all cleared away and just sit there with their drink, dessert, or whatever. It's no judgement about the speed of anyone's eating, so the Brit's too paranoid here.
                    >
                    > Talking in the cinema
                    > I don't know any American who is not offended by people talking in the movie theater, except for the people who are talking. However, the fact that the Brit just sits there and endures it shows he lacks the spine to tell the people to shut up. Most of them will. If they don't, you get the usher or manager to tell them to shut up or to kick them out.
                    >
                    > Making introductions
                    > Why are the Brits so unfriendly that they won't introduce themselves?
                    >
                    > Therapy talk
                    > I don't know any American who will blather on about his therapy, because that's a private matter. Whoever wrote this article must have been spending all his time around rich secular people in the East, who have the money to pay for a therapist as recreation and doesn't go to a church or synagogue. Maybe he just got this from old Woody Allen movies. Most Americans only get therapy if something serious is wrong (and often not even then).
                    >
                    > Describing something as "quite good"
                    > The fact that his is even an issue shows that the Brits must have been using the expression insincerely for so long that the meaning changed. Something like saying, "Well, done!" to mean everything from, "Well, done!" to, "You botched it!" Very Japanese.
                    >
                    > Complaining
                    > If someone is being cheated, taken advantage of, receiving bad service, etc., he deserves to have the situation remedied in the moment. It's kind of despicable to say nothing at the time and then go gossip about it later. This is why John Cleese couldn't get a refund for the dead parrot. In fact, the complaining may be benevolent, because the establishment may be unaware of the problem and will WANT to fix it.
                    >
                    > Over-politeness
                    > Most Americans could do without the greeters at the doors of Walmart or Meijer's, but there's nothing wrong with asking if someone needs help or information. Often they do. Many Europeans tend to think it's over-polite to be spoken to at all, as did a German I met who got angry because a waitress making her rounds routinely asked just once if he wanted his coffee cup refilled (free of charge). One German even went so far as to tell me that if a customer can't find something, "That's his problem!" and that the staff shouldn't speak to him or offer to help.
                    >
                    > Jamie
                    >
                    > On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:57 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                    >
                    > > OK
                    > >
                    > > http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/29/10-things-americans-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-brits/
                    > >
                    > > (the picture is quite apt :) )
                    > >
                    > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                    > >>
                    > >> There's no "Like" button, so you have to contribute an arrogant statement.
                    > >>
                    > >> JK
                    > >>
                    > >> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:22 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                    > >>
                    > >>>
                    > >>> (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)
                    > >>>
                    > >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford <charliestanfordtranslations@> wrote:
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>> Give it a break Jamie
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>> On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>>> **
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist subject"
                    > >>>>> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist subject
                    > >>>>> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses, specialist
                    > >>>>> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college (my old
                    > >>>>> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found on UK
                    > >>>>> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
                    > >>>>> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
                    > >>>>>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say it
                    > >>>>> sounds mighty Czech.
                    > >>>>>>
                    > >>>>>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see the
                    > >>>>> funny side eventually.
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers don't
                    > >>>>> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British on this
                    > >>>>> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is "British
                    > >>>>> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native speakers,
                    > >>>>> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people of all
                    > >>>>> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare blankly and
                    > >>>>> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed electricians-
                    > >>>>> don't understand.
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>> Jamie
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>> _______________________________________________
                    > >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                    > >>>>> Czechlist@
                    > >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>>
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >>>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>>
                    > >>> _______________________________________________
                    > >>> Czechlist mailing list
                    > >>> Czechlist@
                    > >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    > >>
                    > >>
                    > >> _______________________________________________
                    > >> Czechlist mailing list
                    > >> Czechlist@
                    > >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > > _______________________________________________
                    > > Czechlist mailing list
                    > > Czechlist@...
                    > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Czechlist mailing list
                    > Czechlist@...
                    > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >
                  • Hannah Geiger
                    I love it. Personally, lots of Brits settle in America for one reason only: because it feels so bloody good not to have to be civilised at all. Ha Ha. ...
                    Message 9 of 20 , Apr 1, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I love it.

                      Personally, lots of Brits settle in America for one reason only: because it
                      feels so bloody good not to have to be civilised at all. Ha Ha.


                      On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 3:40 PM, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:

                      > I saw this and I thought of you - maybe you ought to invest in some :)
                      > http://m.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/apr/01/guardian-goggles-augmented-reality-specs
                      >
                      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > At least the BBC was balanced in this case, also running an article on
                      > offensive British behavior:
                      > >
                      > http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/24/10-things-brits-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-americans/
                      > >
                      > > Comments on the Americans offensive to Brits article:
                      > >
                      > > No offering to buy a round
                      > > Americans buy rounds in certain types of situations and not in others.
                      > When you've got three or four good friends sitting there, and they're not
                      > going to be drinking gallons and gallons, Americans often buy rounds. If
                      > the group consists of the full cast of The Ten Commandments, most of whom
                      > are strangers, and they're all alcoholics, an American will want separate
                      > bills.
                      > >
                      > > Taking our plates away
                      > > Americans don't like the clutter of empty plates, and they'd rather have
                      > it all cleared away and just sit there with their drink, dessert, or
                      > whatever. It's no judgement about the speed of anyone's eating, so the
                      > Brit's too paranoid here.
                      > >
                      > > Talking in the cinema
                      > > I don't know any American who is not offended by people talking in the
                      > movie theater, except for the people who are talking. However, the fact
                      > that the Brit just sits there and endures it shows he lacks the spine to
                      > tell the people to shut up. Most of them will. If they don't, you get the
                      > usher or manager to tell them to shut up or to kick them out.
                      > >
                      > > Making introductions
                      > > Why are the Brits so unfriendly that they won't introduce themselves?
                      > >
                      > > Therapy talk
                      > > I don't know any American who will blather on about his therapy, because
                      > that's a private matter. Whoever wrote this article must have been
                      > spending all his time around rich secular people in the East, who have the
                      > money to pay for a therapist as recreation and doesn't go to a church or
                      > synagogue. Maybe he just got this from old Woody Allen movies. Most
                      > Americans only get therapy if something serious is wrong (and often not
                      > even then).
                      > >
                      > > Describing something as "quite good"
                      > > The fact that his is even an issue shows that the Brits must have been
                      > using the expression insincerely for so long that the meaning changed.
                      > Something like saying, "Well, done!" to mean everything from, "Well,
                      > done!" to, "You botched it!" Very Japanese.
                      > >
                      > > Complaining
                      > > If someone is being cheated, taken advantage of, receiving bad service,
                      > etc., he deserves to have the situation remedied in the moment. It's kind
                      > of despicable to say nothing at the time and then go gossip about it later.
                      > This is why John Cleese couldn't get a refund for the dead parrot. In
                      > fact, the complaining may be benevolent, because the establishment may be
                      > unaware of the problem and will WANT to fix it.
                      > >
                      > > Over-politeness
                      > > Most Americans could do without the greeters at the doors of Walmart or
                      > Meijer's, but there's nothing wrong with asking if someone needs help or
                      > information. Often they do. Many Europeans tend to think it's over-polite
                      > to be spoken to at all, as did a German I met who got angry because a
                      > waitress making her rounds routinely asked just once if he wanted his
                      > coffee cup refilled (free of charge). One German even went so far as to
                      > tell me that if a customer can't find something, "That's his problem!" and
                      > that the staff shouldn't speak to him or offer to help.
                      > >
                      > > Jamie
                      > >
                      > > On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:57 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > OK
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/29/10-things-americans-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-brits/
                      > > >
                      > > > (the picture is quite apt :) )
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                      > > >>
                      > > >> There's no "Like" button, so you have to contribute an arrogant
                      > statement.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> JK
                      > > >>
                      > > >> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:22 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                      > > >>
                      > > >>>
                      > > >>> (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)
                      > > >>>
                      > > >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford
                      > <charliestanfordtranslations@> wrote:
                      > > >>>>
                      > > >>>> Give it a break Jamie
                      > > >>>>
                      > > >>>>
                      > > >>>> On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                      > > >>>>
                      > > >>>>> **
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist
                      > subject"
                      > > >>>>> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist
                      > subject
                      > > >>>>> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses,
                      > specialist
                      > > >>>>> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college
                      > (my old
                      > > >>>>> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found
                      > on UK
                      > > >>>>> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
                      > > >>>>> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
                      > > >>>>>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say
                      > it
                      > > >>>>> sounds mighty Czech.
                      > > >>>>>>
                      > > >>>>>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see
                      > the
                      > > >>>>> funny side eventually.
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers
                      > don't
                      > > >>>>> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British
                      > on this
                      > > >>>>> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is
                      > "British
                      > > >>>>> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native
                      > speakers,
                      > > >>>>> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people
                      > of all
                      > > >>>>> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare
                      > blankly and
                      > > >>>>> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed
                      > electricians-
                      > > >>>>> don't understand.
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>> Jamie
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>> _______________________________________________
                      > > >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                      > > >>>>> Czechlist@
                      > > >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>>
                      > > >>>>
                      > > >>>>
                      > > >>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >>>>
                      > > >>>
                      > > >>>
                      > > >>> _______________________________________________
                      > > >>> Czechlist mailing list
                      > > >>> Czechlist@
                      > > >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >> _______________________________________________
                      > > >> Czechlist mailing list
                      > > >> Czechlist@
                      > > >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      > > >>
                      > > >
                      > > > _______________________________________________
                      > > > Czechlist mailing list
                      > > > Czechlist@...
                      > > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > _______________________________________________
                      > > Czechlist mailing list
                      > > Czechlist@...
                      > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      > >
                      >
                      > _______________________________________________
                      > Czechlist mailing list
                      > Czechlist@...
                      > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      >
                      _______________________________________________
                      Czechlist mailing list
                      Czechlist@...
                      http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    • James Kirchner
                      Actually, a visit to the UK and just watching the British TV shows that come our way do a pretty good job of disabusing Americans of the notion that the
                      Message 10 of 20 , Apr 1, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Actually, a visit to the UK and just watching the British TV shows that come our way do a pretty good job of disabusing Americans of the notion that the British are more civilized than we are.

                        Here's something from the companion article on the BBC website about things Brits do to annoy Americans:

                        > Saying Americans are unsophisticated
                        > Even if you're standing in line at Disney World, slurping a bucket of Pepsi and thinking, "My, this is country is a cultureless void," don't voice it publicly. After all, you're the one who bought the swimming pool-size soda and a ticket to a theme park rather than, say, the Guggenheim.

                        Yesterday a friend told me a funny story about a young Englishman who arrived in Chicago to volunteer at an institution he works at. The girls were all dazzled by this guy's English accent, and he couldn't believe how many attractive young women were flocking after him. In a few days, however, the girls started feeling cheated, because beneath the guy's "sophisticated" sounding accent was a near total lack of culture. First the girls noticed that he didn't know the most basic things about European history, and his life of a babe magnet deflated from there.

                        Jamie

                        On Apr 1, 2013, at 3:55 PM, Hannah Geiger wrote:

                        > I love it.
                        >
                        > Personally, lots of Brits settle in America for one reason only: because it
                        > feels so bloody good not to have to be civilised at all. Ha Ha.
                        >
                        >
                        > On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 3:40 PM, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >> I saw this and I thought of you - maybe you ought to invest in some :)
                        >> http://m.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/apr/01/guardian-goggles-augmented-reality-specs
                        >>
                        >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                        >>>
                        >>> At least the BBC was balanced in this case, also running an article on
                        >> offensive British behavior:
                        >>>
                        >> http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/24/10-things-brits-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-americans/
                        >>>
                        >>> Comments on the Americans offensive to Brits article:
                        >>>
                        >>> No offering to buy a round
                        >>> Americans buy rounds in certain types of situations and not in others.
                        >> When you've got three or four good friends sitting there, and they're not
                        >> going to be drinking gallons and gallons, Americans often buy rounds. If
                        >> the group consists of the full cast of The Ten Commandments, most of whom
                        >> are strangers, and they're all alcoholics, an American will want separate
                        >> bills.
                        >>>
                        >>> Taking our plates away
                        >>> Americans don't like the clutter of empty plates, and they'd rather have
                        >> it all cleared away and just sit there with their drink, dessert, or
                        >> whatever. It's no judgement about the speed of anyone's eating, so the
                        >> Brit's too paranoid here.
                        >>>
                        >>> Talking in the cinema
                        >>> I don't know any American who is not offended by people talking in the
                        >> movie theater, except for the people who are talking. However, the fact
                        >> that the Brit just sits there and endures it shows he lacks the spine to
                        >> tell the people to shut up. Most of them will. If they don't, you get the
                        >> usher or manager to tell them to shut up or to kick them out.
                        >>>
                        >>> Making introductions
                        >>> Why are the Brits so unfriendly that they won't introduce themselves?
                        >>>
                        >>> Therapy talk
                        >>> I don't know any American who will blather on about his therapy, because
                        >> that's a private matter. Whoever wrote this article must have been
                        >> spending all his time around rich secular people in the East, who have the
                        >> money to pay for a therapist as recreation and doesn't go to a church or
                        >> synagogue. Maybe he just got this from old Woody Allen movies. Most
                        >> Americans only get therapy if something serious is wrong (and often not
                        >> even then).
                        >>>
                        >>> Describing something as "quite good"
                        >>> The fact that his is even an issue shows that the Brits must have been
                        >> using the expression insincerely for so long that the meaning changed.
                        >> Something like saying, "Well, done!" to mean everything from, "Well,
                        >> done!" to, "You botched it!" Very Japanese.
                        >>>
                        >>> Complaining
                        >>> If someone is being cheated, taken advantage of, receiving bad service,
                        >> etc., he deserves to have the situation remedied in the moment. It's kind
                        >> of despicable to say nothing at the time and then go gossip about it later.
                        >> This is why John Cleese couldn't get a refund for the dead parrot. In
                        >> fact, the complaining may be benevolent, because the establishment may be
                        >> unaware of the problem and will WANT to fix it.
                        >>>
                        >>> Over-politeness
                        >>> Most Americans could do without the greeters at the doors of Walmart or
                        >> Meijer's, but there's nothing wrong with asking if someone needs help or
                        >> information. Often they do. Many Europeans tend to think it's over-polite
                        >> to be spoken to at all, as did a German I met who got angry because a
                        >> waitress making her rounds routinely asked just once if he wanted his
                        >> coffee cup refilled (free of charge). One German even went so far as to
                        >> tell me that if a customer can't find something, "That's his problem!" and
                        >> that the staff shouldn't speak to him or offer to help.
                        >>>
                        >>> Jamie
                        >>>
                        >>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:57 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                        >>>
                        >>>> OK
                        >>>>
                        >>>>
                        >> http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/29/10-things-americans-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-brits/
                        >>>>
                        >>>> (the picture is quite apt :) )
                        >>>>
                        >>>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> There's no "Like" button, so you have to contribute an arrogant
                        >> statement.
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> JK
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:22 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>> (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford
                        >> <charliestanfordtranslations@> wrote:
                        >>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>> Give it a break Jamie
                        >>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>> On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                        >>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>> **
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist
                        >> subject"
                        >>>>>>>> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist
                        >> subject
                        >>>>>>>> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses,
                        >> specialist
                        >>>>>>>> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college
                        >> (my old
                        >>>>>>>> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found
                        >> on UK
                        >>>>>>>> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
                        >>>>>>>> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
                        >>>>>>>>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say
                        >> it
                        >>>>>>>> sounds mighty Czech.
                        >>>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see
                        >> the
                        >>>>>>>> funny side eventually.
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers
                        >> don't
                        >>>>>>>> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British
                        >> on this
                        >>>>>>>> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is
                        >> "British
                        >>>>>>>> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native
                        >> speakers,
                        >>>>>>>> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people
                        >> of all
                        >>>>>>>> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare
                        >> blankly and
                        >>>>>>>> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed
                        >> electricians-
                        >>>>>>>> don't understand.
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>> Jamie
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
                        >>>>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                        >>>>>>>> Czechlist@
                        >>>>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >>>>>>>
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>>
                        >>>>>> _______________________________________________
                        >>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                        >>>>>> Czechlist@
                        >>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> _______________________________________________
                        >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                        >>>>> Czechlist@
                        >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>
                        >>>> _______________________________________________
                        >>>> Czechlist mailing list
                        >>>> Czechlist@...
                        >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >>>
                        >>>
                        >>> _______________________________________________
                        >>> Czechlist mailing list
                        >>> Czechlist@...
                        >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >>>
                        >>
                        >> _______________________________________________
                        >> Czechlist mailing list
                        >> Czechlist@...
                        >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >>
                        > _______________________________________________
                        > Czechlist mailing list
                        > Czechlist@...
                        > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


                        _______________________________________________
                        Czechlist mailing list
                        Czechlist@...
                        http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      • wustpisk
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkLRZzukcJc
                        Message 11 of 20 , Apr 1, 2013
                        • 0 Attachment
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkLRZzukcJc

                          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Actually, a visit to the UK and just watching the British TV shows that come our way do a pretty good job of disabusing Americans of the notion that the British are more civilized than we are.
                          >
                          > Here's something from the companion article on the BBC website about things Brits do to annoy Americans:
                          >
                          > > Saying Americans are unsophisticated
                          > > Even if you're standing in line at Disney World, slurping a bucket of Pepsi and thinking, "My, this is country is a cultureless void," don't voice it publicly. After all, you're the one who bought the swimming pool-size soda and a ticket to a theme park rather than, say, the Guggenheim.
                          >
                          > Yesterday a friend told me a funny story about a young Englishman who arrived in Chicago to volunteer at an institution he works at. The girls were all dazzled by this guy's English accent, and he couldn't believe how many attractive young women were flocking after him. In a few days, however, the girls started feeling cheated, because beneath the guy's "sophisticated" sounding accent was a near total lack of culture. First the girls noticed that he didn't know the most basic things about European history, and his life of a babe magnet deflated from there.
                          >
                          > Jamie
                          >
                          > On Apr 1, 2013, at 3:55 PM, Hannah Geiger wrote:
                          >
                          > > I love it.
                          > >
                          > > Personally, lots of Brits settle in America for one reason only: because it
                          > > feels so bloody good not to have to be civilised at all. Ha Ha.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 3:40 PM, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >> I saw this and I thought of you - maybe you ought to invest in some :)
                          > >> http://m.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/apr/01/guardian-goggles-augmented-reality-specs
                          > >>
                          > >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                          > >>>
                          > >>> At least the BBC was balanced in this case, also running an article on
                          > >> offensive British behavior:
                          > >>>
                          > >> http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/24/10-things-brits-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-americans/
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Comments on the Americans offensive to Brits article:
                          > >>>
                          > >>> No offering to buy a round
                          > >>> Americans buy rounds in certain types of situations and not in others.
                          > >> When you've got three or four good friends sitting there, and they're not
                          > >> going to be drinking gallons and gallons, Americans often buy rounds. If
                          > >> the group consists of the full cast of The Ten Commandments, most of whom
                          > >> are strangers, and they're all alcoholics, an American will want separate
                          > >> bills.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Taking our plates away
                          > >>> Americans don't like the clutter of empty plates, and they'd rather have
                          > >> it all cleared away and just sit there with their drink, dessert, or
                          > >> whatever. It's no judgement about the speed of anyone's eating, so the
                          > >> Brit's too paranoid here.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Talking in the cinema
                          > >>> I don't know any American who is not offended by people talking in the
                          > >> movie theater, except for the people who are talking. However, the fact
                          > >> that the Brit just sits there and endures it shows he lacks the spine to
                          > >> tell the people to shut up. Most of them will. If they don't, you get the
                          > >> usher or manager to tell them to shut up or to kick them out.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Making introductions
                          > >>> Why are the Brits so unfriendly that they won't introduce themselves?
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Therapy talk
                          > >>> I don't know any American who will blather on about his therapy, because
                          > >> that's a private matter. Whoever wrote this article must have been
                          > >> spending all his time around rich secular people in the East, who have the
                          > >> money to pay for a therapist as recreation and doesn't go to a church or
                          > >> synagogue. Maybe he just got this from old Woody Allen movies. Most
                          > >> Americans only get therapy if something serious is wrong (and often not
                          > >> even then).
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Describing something as "quite good"
                          > >>> The fact that his is even an issue shows that the Brits must have been
                          > >> using the expression insincerely for so long that the meaning changed.
                          > >> Something like saying, "Well, done!" to mean everything from, "Well,
                          > >> done!" to, "You botched it!" Very Japanese.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Complaining
                          > >>> If someone is being cheated, taken advantage of, receiving bad service,
                          > >> etc., he deserves to have the situation remedied in the moment. It's kind
                          > >> of despicable to say nothing at the time and then go gossip about it later.
                          > >> This is why John Cleese couldn't get a refund for the dead parrot. In
                          > >> fact, the complaining may be benevolent, because the establishment may be
                          > >> unaware of the problem and will WANT to fix it.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Over-politeness
                          > >>> Most Americans could do without the greeters at the doors of Walmart or
                          > >> Meijer's, but there's nothing wrong with asking if someone needs help or
                          > >> information. Often they do. Many Europeans tend to think it's over-polite
                          > >> to be spoken to at all, as did a German I met who got angry because a
                          > >> waitress making her rounds routinely asked just once if he wanted his
                          > >> coffee cup refilled (free of charge). One German even went so far as to
                          > >> tell me that if a customer can't find something, "That's his problem!" and
                          > >> that the staff shouldn't speak to him or offer to help.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Jamie
                          > >>>
                          > >>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:57 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                          > >>>
                          > >>>> OK
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>>
                          > >> http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/29/10-things-americans-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-brits/
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> (the picture is quite apt :) )
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> There's no "Like" button, so you have to contribute an arrogant
                          > >> statement.
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> JK
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:22 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>>>
                          > >>>>>> (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)
                          > >>>>>>
                          > >>>>>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford
                          > >> <charliestanfordtranslations@> wrote:
                          > >>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>> Give it a break Jamie
                          > >>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>> On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                          > >>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>> **
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist
                          > >> subject"
                          > >>>>>>>> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too? Specialist
                          > >> subject
                          > >>>>>>>> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses,
                          > >> specialist
                          > >>>>>>>> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college
                          > >> (my old
                          > >>>>>>>> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be found
                          > >> on UK
                          > >>>>>>>> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
                          > >>>>>>>> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
                          > >>>>>>>>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately say
                          > >> it
                          > >>>>>>>> sounds mighty Czech.
                          > >>>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will see
                          > >> the
                          > >>>>>>>> funny side eventually.
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English speakers
                          > >> don't
                          > >>>>>>>> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British
                          > >> on this
                          > >>>>>>>> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something is
                          > >> "British
                          > >>>>>>>> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native
                          > >> speakers,
                          > >>>>>>>> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated people
                          > >> of all
                          > >>>>>>>> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare
                          > >> blankly and
                          > >>>>>>>> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed
                          > >> electricians-
                          > >>>>>>>> don't understand.
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>> Jamie
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
                          > >>>>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                          > >>>>>>>> Czechlist@
                          > >>>>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          > >>>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>
                          > >>>>>>
                          > >>>>>> _______________________________________________
                          > >>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                          > >>>>>> Czechlist@
                          > >>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> _______________________________________________
                          > >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                          > >>>>> Czechlist@
                          > >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> _______________________________________________
                          > >>>> Czechlist mailing list
                          > >>>> Czechlist@
                          > >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>> _______________________________________________
                          > >>> Czechlist mailing list
                          > >>> Czechlist@
                          > >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          > >>>
                          > >>
                          > >> _______________________________________________
                          > >> Czechlist mailing list
                          > >> Czechlist@...
                          > >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          > >>
                          > > _______________________________________________
                          > > Czechlist mailing list
                          > > Czechlist@...
                          > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >
                          >
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Czechlist mailing list
                          > Czechlist@...
                          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >
                        • Hannah Geiger
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SLG-4cetz8 ... _______________________________________________ Czechlist mailing list Czechlist@czechlist.org
                          Message 12 of 20 , Apr 1, 2013
                          • 0 Attachment
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SLG-4cetz8


                            On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 4:17 PM, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:

                            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkLRZzukcJc
                            >
                            > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Actually, a visit to the UK and just watching the British TV shows that
                            > come our way do a pretty good job of disabusing Americans of the notion
                            > that the British are more civilized than we are.
                            > >
                            > > Here's something from the companion article on the BBC website about
                            > things Brits do to annoy Americans:
                            > >
                            > > > Saying Americans are unsophisticated
                            > > > Even if you're standing in line at Disney World, slurping a bucket of
                            > Pepsi and thinking, "My, this is country is a cultureless void," don't
                            > voice it publicly. After all, you're the one who bought the swimming
                            > pool-size soda and a ticket to a theme park rather than, say, the
                            > Guggenheim.
                            > >
                            > > Yesterday a friend told me a funny story about a young Englishman who
                            > arrived in Chicago to volunteer at an institution he works at. The girls
                            > were all dazzled by this guy's English accent, and he couldn't believe how
                            > many attractive young women were flocking after him. In a few days,
                            > however, the girls started feeling cheated, because beneath the guy's
                            > "sophisticated" sounding accent was a near total lack of culture. First
                            > the girls noticed that he didn't know the most basic things about European
                            > history, and his life of a babe magnet deflated from there.
                            > >
                            > > Jamie
                            > >
                            > > On Apr 1, 2013, at 3:55 PM, Hannah Geiger wrote:
                            > >
                            > > > I love it.
                            > > >
                            > > > Personally, lots of Brits settle in America for one reason only:
                            > because it
                            > > > feels so bloody good not to have to be civilised at all. Ha Ha.
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 3:40 PM, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > >> I saw this and I thought of you - maybe you ought to invest in some :)
                            > > >>
                            > http://m.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/apr/01/guardian-goggles-augmented-reality-specs
                            > > >>
                            > > >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> At least the BBC was balanced in this case, also running an article
                            > on
                            > > >> offensive British behavior:
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>
                            > http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/24/10-things-brits-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-americans/
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Comments on the Americans offensive to Brits article:
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> No offering to buy a round
                            > > >>> Americans buy rounds in certain types of situations and not in
                            > others.
                            > > >> When you've got three or four good friends sitting there, and they're
                            > not
                            > > >> going to be drinking gallons and gallons, Americans often buy rounds.
                            > If
                            > > >> the group consists of the full cast of The Ten Commandments, most of
                            > whom
                            > > >> are strangers, and they're all alcoholics, an American will want
                            > separate
                            > > >> bills.
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Taking our plates away
                            > > >>> Americans don't like the clutter of empty plates, and they'd rather
                            > have
                            > > >> it all cleared away and just sit there with their drink, dessert, or
                            > > >> whatever. It's no judgement about the speed of anyone's eating, so
                            > the
                            > > >> Brit's too paranoid here.
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Talking in the cinema
                            > > >>> I don't know any American who is not offended by people talking in
                            > the
                            > > >> movie theater, except for the people who are talking. However, the
                            > fact
                            > > >> that the Brit just sits there and endures it shows he lacks the spine
                            > to
                            > > >> tell the people to shut up. Most of them will. If they don't, you
                            > get the
                            > > >> usher or manager to tell them to shut up or to kick them out.
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Making introductions
                            > > >>> Why are the Brits so unfriendly that they won't introduce themselves?
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Therapy talk
                            > > >>> I don't know any American who will blather on about his therapy,
                            > because
                            > > >> that's a private matter. Whoever wrote this article must have been
                            > > >> spending all his time around rich secular people in the East, who
                            > have the
                            > > >> money to pay for a therapist as recreation and doesn't go to a church
                            > or
                            > > >> synagogue. Maybe he just got this from old Woody Allen movies. Most
                            > > >> Americans only get therapy if something serious is wrong (and often
                            > not
                            > > >> even then).
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Describing something as "quite good"
                            > > >>> The fact that his is even an issue shows that the Brits must have
                            > been
                            > > >> using the expression insincerely for so long that the meaning changed.
                            > > >> Something like saying, "Well, done!" to mean everything from, "Well,
                            > > >> done!" to, "You botched it!" Very Japanese.
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Complaining
                            > > >>> If someone is being cheated, taken advantage of, receiving bad
                            > service,
                            > > >> etc., he deserves to have the situation remedied in the moment. It's
                            > kind
                            > > >> of despicable to say nothing at the time and then go gossip about it
                            > later.
                            > > >> This is why John Cleese couldn't get a refund for the dead parrot. In
                            > > >> fact, the complaining may be benevolent, because the establishment
                            > may be
                            > > >> unaware of the problem and will WANT to fix it.
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Over-politeness
                            > > >>> Most Americans could do without the greeters at the doors of Walmart
                            > or
                            > > >> Meijer's, but there's nothing wrong with asking if someone needs help
                            > or
                            > > >> information. Often they do. Many Europeans tend to think it's
                            > over-polite
                            > > >> to be spoken to at all, as did a German I met who got angry because a
                            > > >> waitress making her rounds routinely asked just once if he wanted his
                            > > >> coffee cup refilled (free of charge). One German even went so far as
                            > to
                            > > >> tell me that if a customer can't find something, "That's his
                            > problem!" and
                            > > >> that the staff shouldn't speak to him or offer to help.
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> Jamie
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:57 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>>> OK
                            > > >>>>
                            > > >>>>
                            > > >>
                            > http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2013/01/29/10-things-americans-dont-realize-are-offensive-to-brits/
                            > > >>>>
                            > > >>>> (the picture is quite apt :) )
                            > > >>>>
                            > > >>>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@>
                            > wrote:
                            > > >>>>>
                            > > >>>>> There's no "Like" button, so you have to contribute an arrogant
                            > > >> statement.
                            > > >>>>>
                            > > >>>>> JK
                            > > >>>>>
                            > > >>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 3:22 PM, wustpisk wrote:
                            > > >>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>> (where's the 'like' button on this thing?)
                            > > >>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Charles Stanford
                            > > >> <charliestanfordtranslations@> wrote:
                            > > >>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>> Give it a break Jamie
                            > > >>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>> On 30 March 2013 14:48, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                            > > >>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>> **
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>> On Mar 30, 2013, at 6:03 AM, Melvyn wrote:
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>> You work in US academia. In Britain the expression "specialist
                            > > >> subject"
                            > > >>>>>>>> is totally commonplace. Do these sound odd to you too?
                            > Specialist
                            > > >> subject
                            > > >>>>>>>> degree, specialist subject teacher, specialist interest courses,
                            > > >> specialist
                            > > >>>>>>>> interest groups, specialist college, specialist science college
                            > > >> (my old
                            > > >>>>>>>> grammar school is now one), specialist school...? All can be
                            > found
                            > > >> on UK
                            > > >>>>>>>> (plus Aussie and NZ) educational and not-for-profit sites. Even
                            > > >>>>>>>> bilingualism gets a Specialist Interest Group
                            > > >>>>>>>>> http://www.londonsigbilingualism.co.uk/
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>> Yes, most of them sound odd to me.
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>> So again you come across something unfamiliar and immediately
                            > say
                            > > >> it
                            > > >>>>>>>> sounds mighty Czech.
                            > > >>>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>> But don't let me stop you doing this. I am sure even you will
                            > see
                            > > >> the
                            > > >>>>>>>> funny side eventually.
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>> At least I don't freak out when I find that most English
                            > speakers
                            > > >> don't
                            > > >>>>>>>> understand my state's localisms, which is something that British
                            > > >> on this
                            > > >>>>>>>> list seem to do. Tell them that "flobblekabobble" or something
                            > is
                            > > >> "British
                            > > >>>>>>>> slang" and that it won't be understood by the majority of native
                            > > >> speakers,
                            > > >>>>>>>> and it becomes a national insult. I'm still asking educated
                            > people
                            > > >> of all
                            > > >>>>>>>> ages if they know what "suss out" means, and they just stare
                            > > >> blankly and
                            > > >>>>>>>> have no idea. Same thing with "the mains", which even licensed
                            > > >> electricians-
                            > > >>>>>>>> don't understand.
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>> Jamie
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
                            > > >>>>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                            > > >>>>>>>> Czechlist@
                            > > >>>>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > > >>>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>>
                            > > >>>>>> _______________________________________________
                            > > >>>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                            > > >>>>>> Czechlist@
                            > > >>>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > > >>>>>
                            > > >>>>>
                            > > >>>>> _______________________________________________
                            > > >>>>> Czechlist mailing list
                            > > >>>>> Czechlist@
                            > > >>>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > > >>>>>
                            > > >>>>
                            > > >>>> _______________________________________________
                            > > >>>> Czechlist mailing list
                            > > >>>> Czechlist@
                            > > >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>> _______________________________________________
                            > > >>> Czechlist mailing list
                            > > >>> Czechlist@
                            > > >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > > >>>
                            > > >>
                            > > >> _______________________________________________
                            > > >> Czechlist mailing list
                            > > >> Czechlist@...
                            > > >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > > >>
                            > > > _______________________________________________
                            > > > Czechlist mailing list
                            > > > Czechlist@...
                            > > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > _______________________________________________
                            > > Czechlist mailing list
                            > > Czechlist@...
                            > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > >
                            >
                            > _______________________________________________
                            > Czechlist mailing list
                            > Czechlist@...
                            > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            >
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