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Re: [Czechlist] "Flapjack"?

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  • James Kirchner
    I thought Pancake Day was a British term. In Michigan, it s called Paczki Day. Jamie ... _______________________________________________ Czechlist mailing
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 28, 2013
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      I thought "Pancake Day" was a British term. In Michigan, it's called Paczki Day.

      Jamie

      On Mar 28, 2013, at 8:37 AM, Melvyn wrote:

      >
      >
      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> I think it is more like 'Liberal, Kansas' :) (sounds like an oxymoron)
      >>
      >> http://www.pancakeday.net/about.htm
      >
      > Palacinkovy beh? One way to keep warm, I suppose.
      > http://www.zsmladi.cz/index.php?mact=News,cntnt01,detail,0&cntnt01articleid=34&cntnt01category_id=26&cntnt01returnid=15&cntnt01returnid=15
      >
      >
      > BR
      >
      > Melvyn
      > Happy Maundy Thursday AKA zeleny ctvrtek. Cesky privlastek zeleny vznikl zkomolenim puvodniho nemeckeho nazvu Greindonnerstag (lkavy ctvrtek) na Grundonnerstag (zeleny ctvrtek)
      > http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zelen%C3%BD_%C4%8Dtvrtek
      >
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    • James Kirchner
      So, in the US they d likely be called chewy granola bars (a common commercial description). Jamie ... _______________________________________________
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 28, 2013
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        So, in the US they'd likely be called "chewy granola bars" (a common commercial description).

        Jamie

        On Mar 28, 2013, at 7:15 AM, jenuwefa wrote:

        >
        >
        > Oh I love flapjacks! Jamie, they're something like underbaked cookie dough bars. I buy them at Costa Coffee or Marks & Spencer here in Prague. Very solid, good when you need a quick something that will keep you filled for a while.
        >
        > Jennifer
        >
        > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> Deadly weapons. If you see someone coming towards you with a flapjack, best not stick around.
        >>
        >> http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/society/flapjacks-gang-weapon-of-choice-2013032663927
        >>
        >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
        >>>
        >>> In a news article yesterday, I saw a photo of what Brits were calling "flapjacks".
        >>>
        >>> In the United States, a flapjack is a pancake. Nothing more, nothing less than a pancake.
        >>>
        >>> However, these British things looked like whole-grain chocolate chip cookies. What are they?
        >>>
        >>> Jamie
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> _______________________________________________
        >>> Czechlist mailing list
        >>> Czechlist@
        >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        >>>
        >>
        >
        >
        > _______________________________________________
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      • James Kirchner
        In my universe, we don t add the name of a state after the name of the city, but just USA , so it would be something like Heartburn City, USA . More common
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 28, 2013
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          In my universe, we don't add the name of a state after the name of the city, but just "USA", so it would be something like "Heartburn City, USA".

          More common would be to add "-sville" to anything, so you could have said "Hearburnsville".

          Jamie

          On Mar 28, 2013, at 7:32 AM, Melvyn wrote:

          > But whoah, too much syrup and it's heartburn city, Arizona. (Did I use that turn of phrase correctly?)
          >
          > BR
          >
          > Melvyn

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        • ac4a39b37975b8c0096d48b3385836a2
          Nooo....they re more doughy than chewy granola bars. And thicker - about an inch thick, but otherwise roughly the same dimensions. Basically if you made a
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 28, 2013
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            Nooo....they're more doughy than chewy granola bars. And thicker - about an inch thick, but otherwise roughly the same dimensions. Basically if you made a batch of oatmeal cookies (there are other kinds, but this is the one I eat the most) and added lots of raisins, dried cranberries, maybe some other dried fruit, pressed the dough into a deep cookie sheet and baked it for 5 minutes less than you normally would, cooled it and cut it into bars, you'd have flapjacks.

            Jen

            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
            >
            > So, in the US they'd likely be called "chewy granola bars" (a common commercial description).
            >
            > Jamie
            >
            > On Mar 28, 2013, at 7:15 AM, jenuwefa wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >
            > > Oh I love flapjacks! Jamie, they're something like underbaked cookie dough bars. I buy them at Costa Coffee or Marks & Spencer here in Prague. Very solid, good when you need a quick something that will keep you filled for a while.
            > >
            > > Jennifer
            > >
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