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Re: [Czechlist] CHAT: Deformation professionnelle (was: Monterky)

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  • James Kirchner
    Since the driver ahead of you can t hear you, I was thinking more in terms of what people would say -- or shout -- inside their own car out of frustration with
    Message 1 of 46 , Mar 3, 2013
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      Since the driver ahead of you can't hear you, I was thinking more in terms of what people would say -- or shout -- inside their own car out of frustration with the motionless person ahead of him.

      I was largely cured of this when I sat behind a clearly alert woman who waited and waited and waited at a green light in the ghetto. When I was about to honk, suddenly a car driven by some thug zoomed through the intersection, against the red light, at at least twice the speed limit. There are certain sections of the city where younger people completely ignore traffic lights, and this was one of them. I decided this woman knew her own neighborhood and I didn't, so I'd best shut up.

      When I was riding with a friend near downtown Chicago, a policeman behind him turned on his flashers, and my friend didn't stop. Through his bullhorn, the cop yelled, "PULL YOUR ASS OVER!" I was surprised, because I had never heard a Detroit policeman curse. The Detroit cops generally talk even to the lowest forms of life as if they were speaking to a gentleman.

      Jamie

      On Mar 3, 2013, at 7:20 AM, Liz wrote:

      > How odd, I posted on Friday but it never made it to prime time...
      >
      > Boston's probably a bit different from Detroit - "move your ass" would come out of the mouth of someone from New York or beyond. The "zelenejsi to uz nebude" would depend a lot on the people doing the communicating:
      >
      > A friend/passenger in the car would probably quickly blurt out that it's green, then say it's "Dunkin' time" (time to chug a liter of coffee from the drive-thru) or ask when the last time the driver's eyes were checked.
      >
      > Assuming the windows are down, a pedestrian on the street might joke loudly, "Anytime now, (sir/m'am)" or make a snarky remark; a female driver in one of the tougher neighborhoods could expect a sexist remark.
      >
      > Driver-driver verbal communication is rare, so other drivers would just honk and perhaps gesture "move along". In general, drivers communicate just by speeding up, cutting off, and flashing lights - a lot like Prague drivers :)
      >
      > As to door-shutting, admittedly, we'd stay polite... though my French teacher (a Bostonian) used to start every class with "Fermez la porte et fermez les bouches" (shut the door and shut your traps).
      >
      > - Liz
      >
      >
      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Talacko <valerie@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> The difference that occurred to me is that Americans do have more of a
      >> habit of being polite/circumspect with strangers (maybe it's a
      >> traditional thing - being careful not to cross people whose help you
      >> might need, and all that) and thus might simply not be expecting sarcasm
      >> from someone they don't know very well. That would be less of a factor
      >> in the UK.
      >>
      >> When it comes to talking to people they know well, I can imagine
      >> Americans saying something like "Do you want to turn that music up a
      >> little?" just as much as Brits.
      >>
      >> Valerie
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> On 02.03.2013 20:12, James Kirchner wrote:
      >>> I once saw a cop yell at a woman: "Lady, that light was as red as red
      >>> could be!" That's similar to, "Zelenejsi to snad nebude..."
      >>>
      >>> People here often yell, "WHATAYA WAITIN' FOR, CHRISTMAS?"
      >>>
      >>> I don't think we lack nasty, sarcastic standard remarks. And they do
      >>> get quite colorful.
      >>>
      >>> I'm still trying to figure out what Matej thinks is acceptable
      >>> sarcasm in the CR and UK that's not acceptable in the US.
      >>>
      >>> Jamie
      >>>
      >>> On Mar 2, 2013, at 2:00 PM, Melvyn wrote:
      >>>
      >>>>
      >>>>> On Mar 1, 2013, at 5:34 AM, Melvyn wrote:
      >>>>>
      >>>>>> Imagine a car is stopped and the driver is chatting away even
      >>> though the traffic lights have changed to green. What do people
      >>> typically say in your part of the world? Zelenejsi to snad nebude,
      >>> pane...?
      >>>>
      >>>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner wrote:
      >>>>
      >>>>> "MOVE YOUR ASS, MISTER!" or, "MOVE YOUR ASS, LADY!" In the United
      >>> States, we just say it.
      >>>>
      >>>> So you do. We have that option, though "lady" requires a :-) "m'",
      >>> unless you prefer low colloquial and totally incorrect "missus":
      >>>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3ywa-9Cu4M [1]
      >>>>
      >>>> but if I were writing a novel or a screenplay set in London my
      >>> standard-issue lovable Cockney taxi driver would say:
      >>>>
      >>>> Oy, you waitin' for bloomin' Christmas, mate?
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>>> Or if somebody leaves a door open. Mas v prdeli voj...?
      >>>>>
      >>>>> "Brought up in a barn?!" (I actually teach that expression to my
      >>> ESL students, because they give me so much opportunity to say it.)
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> There's doors in this house!
      >>>>
      >>>> or you can always resort to camp comedians' catchphrases.
      >>>>
      >>>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzSdrfdqnUQ [2]
      >>>>
      >>>> BR
      >>>>
      >>>> Melvyn
      >>>>
      >
      >
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    • Sarka Rubkova
      Nakonec jsem opravdu zvolila tuto variantu, ¾e jedná o zabalené zbo¾í dodávané na nezakrytém náklaïáku Sarka ... From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Message 46 of 46 , Mar 5, 2013
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        Nakonec jsem opravdu zvolila tuto variantu, že jedná o zabalené zboží
        dodávané na nezakrytém náklaďáku

        Sarka

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Hana Jarolímová
        Sent: Friday, March 01, 2013 11:35 AM
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Deformation professionnelle (was: Monterky)

        no, nemysli se tim "packing without covers", jako zabalene, ale nezakryte?
        H


        Dne 1.3.2013 11:24, Sarka Rubkova napsal(a):
        > Ahoj, nejsem si jista významem části následující věty po "without"
        >
        >
        >
        > The Price is to be understood for the delivery goods
        >
        > (acc. to Incoterms 2010) including adequate packing
        >
        > without covers excluding taxes, duty and any other fees in Czech Republic.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Díky
        >
        >
        >
        > Sarka
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
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