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Re: CHAT: Deformation professionnelle (was: Monterky)

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  • Liz
    How odd, I posted on Friday but it never made it to prime time... Boston s probably a bit different from Detroit - move your ass would come out of the mouth
    Message 1 of 46 , Mar 3, 2013
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      How odd, I posted on Friday but it never made it to prime time...

      Boston's probably a bit different from Detroit - "move your ass" would come out of the mouth of someone from New York or beyond. The "zelenejsi to uz nebude" would depend a lot on the people doing the communicating:

      A friend/passenger in the car would probably quickly blurt out that it's green, then say it's "Dunkin' time" (time to chug a liter of coffee from the drive-thru) or ask when the last time the driver's eyes were checked.

      Assuming the windows are down, a pedestrian on the street might joke loudly, "Anytime now, (sir/m'am)" or make a snarky remark; a female driver in one of the tougher neighborhoods could expect a sexist remark.

      Driver-driver verbal communication is rare, so other drivers would just honk and perhaps gesture "move along". In general, drivers communicate just by speeding up, cutting off, and flashing lights - a lot like Prague drivers :)

      As to door-shutting, admittedly, we'd stay polite... though my French teacher (a Bostonian) used to start every class with "Fermez la porte et fermez les bouches" (shut the door and shut your traps).

      - Liz


      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Talacko <valerie@...> wrote:
      >
      > The difference that occurred to me is that Americans do have more of a
      > habit of being polite/circumspect with strangers (maybe it's a
      > traditional thing - being careful not to cross people whose help you
      > might need, and all that) and thus might simply not be expecting sarcasm
      > from someone they don't know very well. That would be less of a factor
      > in the UK.
      >
      > When it comes to talking to people they know well, I can imagine
      > Americans saying something like "Do you want to turn that music up a
      > little?" just as much as Brits.
      >
      > Valerie
      >
      >
      >
      > On 02.03.2013 20:12, James Kirchner wrote:
      > > I once saw a cop yell at a woman: "Lady, that light was as red as red
      > > could be!" That's similar to, "Zelenejsi to snad nebude..."
      > >
      > > People here often yell, "WHATAYA WAITIN' FOR, CHRISTMAS?"
      > >
      > > I don't think we lack nasty, sarcastic standard remarks. And they do
      > > get quite colorful.
      > >
      > > I'm still trying to figure out what Matej thinks is acceptable
      > > sarcasm in the CR and UK that's not acceptable in the US.
      > >
      > > Jamie
      > >
      > > On Mar 2, 2013, at 2:00 PM, Melvyn wrote:
      > >
      > > >
      > > >> On Mar 1, 2013, at 5:34 AM, Melvyn wrote:
      > > >>
      > > >>> Imagine a car is stopped and the driver is chatting away even
      > > though the traffic lights have changed to green. What do people
      > > typically say in your part of the world? Zelenejsi to snad nebude,
      > > pane...?
      > > >
      > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner wrote:
      > > >
      > > >> "MOVE YOUR ASS, MISTER!" or, "MOVE YOUR ASS, LADY!" In the United
      > > States, we just say it.
      > > >
      > > > So you do. We have that option, though "lady" requires a :-) "m'",
      > > unless you prefer low colloquial and totally incorrect "missus":
      > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3ywa-9Cu4M [1]
      > > >
      > > > but if I were writing a novel or a screenplay set in London my
      > > standard-issue lovable Cockney taxi driver would say:
      > > >
      > > > Oy, you waitin' for bloomin' Christmas, mate?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >>
      > > >>> Or if somebody leaves a door open. Mas v prdeli voj...?
      > > >>
      > > >> "Brought up in a barn?!" (I actually teach that expression to my
      > > ESL students, because they give me so much opportunity to say it.)
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > There's doors in this house!
      > > >
      > > > or you can always resort to camp comedians' catchphrases.
      > > >
      > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzSdrfdqnUQ [2]
      > > >
      > > > BR
      > > >
      > > > Melvyn
      > > >
    • Sarka Rubkova
      Nakonec jsem opravdu zvolila tuto variantu, ¾e jedná o zabalené zbo¾í dodávané na nezakrytém náklaïáku Sarka ... From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Message 46 of 46 , Mar 5, 2013
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        Nakonec jsem opravdu zvolila tuto variantu, že jedná o zabalené zboží
        dodávané na nezakrytém náklaďáku

        Sarka

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Hana Jarolímová
        Sent: Friday, March 01, 2013 11:35 AM
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Deformation professionnelle (was: Monterky)

        no, nemysli se tim "packing without covers", jako zabalene, ale nezakryte?
        H


        Dne 1.3.2013 11:24, Sarka Rubkova napsal(a):
        > Ahoj, nejsem si jista významem části následující věty po "without"
        >
        >
        >
        > The Price is to be understood for the delivery goods
        >
        > (acc. to Incoterms 2010) including adequate packing
        >
        > without covers excluding taxes, duty and any other fees in Czech Republic.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Díky
        >
        >
        >
        > Sarka
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
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