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Re: pro zmenu gastronomicke vyrazy

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  • wustpisk
    There s a similar discussion in German re. Lungenbraten http://dict.leo.org/forum/viewUnsolvedquery.php?idThread=119462&idForum=1&lp=ende&lang=de I wouldn t
    Message 1 of 62 , Jan 22, 2013
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      There's a similar discussion in German re. Lungenbraten http://dict.leo.org/forum/viewUnsolvedquery.php?idThread=119462&idForum=1&lp=ende&lang=de

      I wouldn't necessarily translate svickova literally - "Traditional Czech 'Svickova' beef in cream sauce" or similar.

      I think 'fillet'/'sirloin'/'tenderloin'/whatever (even though that may be technically what it is) is misleading as a steak purist would certainly be disappointed.

      My stomach also churns slightly when I see the word 'gastronomy' - it conjures up the image of having a rubber tube shoved down one's throat.
      I must be doing too many medical translations ... :)

      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" wrote:
      >
      > BTW it is interesting to compare the different ways the animal is cut up in the USA, Britain and the Czech Republic:
      >
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirloin_steak
      >
      > http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sv%C3%AD%C4%8Dkov%C3%A1
      >
      > Notice svickova comes under number seven in the Czech chart, which corresponds to the German Filet (click on chart). But then "sirloin" seems to be a well-established translation here.
      >
      > Just the other day a Californian friend was asking me where to get tri tips. I had never even heard of them, but I found spodni sal:
      >
      > http://pages.citebite.com/t4g2q5pxkpt
      >
      > Not sure if I gave him a bum steer there.
      >
      > An Argentinian friend once told Hana that they cut up beef all wrong in this part of Europe (vertically not horizontally) which evidently is one reason (among several) why this meat is so tough here.
      >
      > BR
      >
      > Melvyn
      >
    • wustpisk
      Poor horse - hasn t it been flogged enough already? ... (the horse analogy is intended - I m certain that more than one piece of the noble beast of burden has
      Message 62 of 62 , Jan 24, 2013
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        Poor horse - hasn't it been flogged enough already?



        ---
        (the horse analogy is intended - I'm certain that more than one piece of the noble beast of burden has been served to me in the form of svickova or gulas in the past. BTW my favourite svickova used to be available at the nonstop bufet at Brno hlavni nadrazi (28 Kc) and if that meat had ever been near a cow, let alone a fillet thereof, then I'm a monkey's uncle ... )

        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner wrote:
        >
        > I've always seen pot roast arrive at the table as a slab, which is then cut up. I have never seen svickova arrive at the table as a slab.
        >
        > JK
        >
        > On Jan 23, 2013, at 4:36 PM, jenuwefa wrote:
        >
        > > I'm not sure what you're getting at - svickova - no matter which cut of meat is used - is cooked as a "slab" and then sliced before serving....and that's how my mom always made/served pot roast as well....
        > >
        > >
        > > Jennifer
        > >
        > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner wrote:
        > >>
        > >> Pot roast is a slab.
        > >>
        > >> Jamie
        > >>
        > >> On Jan 23, 2013, at 1:51 PM, jenuwefa wrote:
        > >>
        > >>> I agree with you, Kent. I've also seen the term "pot roast" used - so "pot roast with cream sauce" might be one possibility.
        > >>>
        > >>> Jennifer
        > >>>
        > >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Kent Christopher Kasha" wrote:
        > >>>>
        > >>>> Hi all,
        > >>>>
        > >>>>
        > >>>>
        > >>>> My guess is that braced is an incorrect transcription of braised, which fits
        > >>>> for svickova. I usually translate it as 'beef in cream sauce' since one is
        > >>>> never sure if true sirloin is being used and it is universally
        > >>>> understandable. People from German backgrounds or areas where there is a
        > >>>> strong German presence might understand sauerbraten. Others, myself
        > >>>> included, would have no idea what sauerbraten might actually be and would be
        > >>>> no better off than if it had been left in Czech.
        > >>>>
        > >>>> Gastronomy brings gastroenteritis to mind.
        > >>>>
        > >>>> My pet peeve with translating menus is that many restaurants try to be cute
        > >>>> and have dishes with names that tell nothing of the actual dish in question.
        > >>>> One menu had entries like: Svejkovy nabojnice, Svejkuv nasup na prkne and,
        > >>>> worst of all, Sen porucika Marka while the kiddies could order Mikesovo
        > >>>> paci-paci with vysmate brambory.
        > >>>>
        > >>>>
        > >>>>
        > >>>> KK
        > >>>>
        > >
        > > _______________________________________________
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        > > Czechlist@...
        > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        >
        >
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