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Re: "via"

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  • wustpisk
    I would apply the duck test
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 25, 2012
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      I would apply the duck test

      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks, Gerry.
      >
      > I don't use TMs as the fount of all knowledge, but if I am translating a text intended to be read by the British, and the TM contains high-quality translations by a native British speaker, I will tend to defer to that person's usage. If it's obviously junk, I don't. Sometimes what looks to me like it might be junk is just British usage that I don't know, and at other times it's really junk, so I have to ask.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Nov 25, 2012, at 12:58 PM, wustpisk wrote:
      >
      > > At university I shared a house with a broad Wiganer for three years so I had an excellent opportunity to study this particular dialect in some depth and I noticed that they occasionally use 'through' for an instrumental, but in the German sense of 'durch' - e.g. Berlin war zerstort durch Bomben
      > > It may well be the case also in other Lancashire towns (or elsewhere too), but it ain't the Queen's English.
      > > But I wouldn't use 'via' in the cases you mention except where used in its original Latin sense - something else would be more appropriate, and I wouldn't use TMs as the fount of all knowledge.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@> wrote:
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
      > >>>
      > >>> So, we appear to agree.
      > >>
      > >> Yes, though I get the impression some native speakers are indeed quite happy with this "by means of" usage. Merriam Webster lists this sentence as an example:
      > >>
      > >> He did some research via computer.
      > >>
      > >> Borderline case, perhaps, but myself, I would look for other prepositions here, and most certainly in the examples that you gave.
      > >>
      > >> BR
      > >>
      > >> M.
      > >>
      > >
      > >
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    • Melvyn
      ... Not just a regionalism IMHO. I reckon through instead of by can sometimes sound rather literary and/or olde worlde. I have wealth earned through my
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 26, 2012
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        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
        >I noticed that they occasionally use 'through' for an instrumental, but in the German sense of 'durch' - e.g. Berlin war zerstört durch Bomben.
        > It may well be the case also in other Lancashire towns (or elsewhere too), but it ain't the Queen's English.


        Not just a regionalism IMHO. I reckon "through" instead of "by" can sometimes sound rather literary and/or olde worlde.

        I have wealth earned through my efforts & enterprise, amassed through the strength of my arm, and piled up through the sweat of my brow.
        http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an04/an04.062.than.html


        Any other examples?

        BR

        M.
      • wustpisk
        You re right - I noticed yesterday morning that the Nicine creed states: through him all things were made , for example ( Per quem omnia facta sunt ) - per ,
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 26, 2012
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          You're right - I noticed yesterday morning that the Nicine creed states: 'through him all things were made', for example ('Per quem omnia facta sunt') - 'per', rather than 'via'.

          It was the particular use of 'through' in Wigan which exactly mirrors the German sense of 'durch' in the 'by means of' sense, also in the sense of 'because of' which struck me as unusual, and aside from that the Germanic/Viking influence on the language is generally marked in that neck of the woods (but not as much as in Newcastle). But it is probably a poor example.

          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@> wrote:
          > >I noticed that they occasionally use 'through' for an instrumental, but in the German sense of 'durch' - e.g. Berlin war zerstört durch Bomben.
          > > It may well be the case also in other Lancashire towns (or elsewhere too), but it ain't the Queen's English.
          >
          >
          > Not just a regionalism IMHO. I reckon "through" instead of "by" can sometimes sound rather literary and/or olde worlde.
          >
          > I have wealth earned through my efforts & enterprise, amassed through the strength of my arm, and piled up through the sweat of my brow.
          > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an04/an04.062.than.html
          >
          >
          > Any other examples?
          >
          > BR
          >
          > M.
          >
        • Melvyn
          ... Hmm, now you have got me comparing the New International Version of John 1:3: Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 27, 2012
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            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:



            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:

            > You're right - I noticed yesterday morning that the Nicine creed states: 'through him all things were made', for example ('Per quem omnia facta sunt') - 'per', rather than 'via'.

            Hmm, now you have got me comparing the New International Version of John 1:3:

            Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made.

            with the King James Version:
            All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.

            Seems to me there is a big potential difference in meaning between "through him" and "by him" here.

            No problems like that in Czech.

            Kralicky 1613
            Vsecky veci skrze ne ucineny jsou, a bez neho nic neni ucineno, coz ucineno jest.

            Ekumenicky 1985
            Vsechno povstalo skrze ne a bez neho nepovstalo nic, co jest.


            > It was the particular use of 'through' in Wigan which exactly mirrors the German sense of 'durch' in the 'by means of' sense, also in the sense of 'because of'

            Do the yonners up there (excuse Manc cosmopolitan chauvinism) say things like "Tha shant get thur any faster through shovin"?

            And do people in Wigan say "ooh, I'm coming over all wigan pier"? :-)

            >which struck me as unusual, and aside from that the Germanic/Viking influence on the language is generally marked in that neck of the woods (but not as much as in Newcastle).

            I read that for several centuries the Book of Common Prayer contained the prayer that God would "…deliver us from the North Man".

            Fortunately, the ninth century fortified settlements along the River Mersey seem to have done their job well, so we in Stretford retain our "grating accent that sounds halfway to Scouse", with none of that ecky thump stuff. :-) (excuse pure groundless speculation).

            BR

            M.
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