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HELP - TERM: checkout or carts

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  • Jaroslav Hejzlar
    Dear friends, I need your help with the term “checkout or carts” in the context of educational equipment: ...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
      Dear friends,
      I need your help with the term “checkout or carts” in the context of educational equipment:

      ...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks available for students as necessary (checkout or carts)

      Can you please provide me with some suggestions how to translate this to Czech or at least some explanation of what they mean?
      Thanks a lot in advance.
      Best regards,
      Jaroslav Hejzlar


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jakub Skrebsky
      I guess it means cart and checkout used in online shopping , pokladna nebo nakupni kosik. Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device ... From: Jaroslav
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
        I guess it means cart and checkout used in online shopping , pokladna nebo nakupni kosik.
        Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@...>
        Sender: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2012 10:17:40
        To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Reply-To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Czechlist] HELP - TERM: checkout or carts

        Dear friends,
        I need your help with the term “checkout or carts” in the context of educational equipment:

        ...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks available for students as necessary (checkout or carts)

        Can you please provide me with some suggestions how to translate this to Czech or at least some explanation of what they mean?
        Thanks a lot in advance.
        Best regards,
        Jaroslav Hejzlar


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • (no author)
        spise zpusob jakym budou studenti notebooky rezervovat/prebirat, pokud nedostane pridelen kazdy jeden ale budou jen on demand ... i kdyz to cart tam zrovna
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
          spise zpusob jakym budou studenti notebooky rezervovat/prebirat, pokud
          nedostane pridelen kazdy jeden ale budou jen "on demand"... i kdyz to
          cart tam zrovna dvakrat nechapu a nikdy jsem se s necim takovym
          nesetkal..

          M
          ------ Original Message ------
          From: "Jakub Skrebsky" <jakub.skrebsky@...>
          To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: 12.10.2012 11:15:28
          Subject: Re: [Czechlist] HELP - TERM: checkout or carts
          > I guess it means cart and checkout used in online shopping , pokladna
          >nebo nakupni kosik.
          >Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device
          >
          >-----Original Message-----
          >From: "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@...>
          >Sender: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          >Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2012 10:17:40
          >To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
          >Reply-To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [Czechlist] HELP - TERM: checkout or carts
          >
          >Dear friends,
          >I need your help with the term “checkout or carts” in the context of
          >educational equipment:
          >
          >...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks available for students
          >as necessary (checkout or carts)
          >
          >Can you please provide me with some suggestions how to translate this
          >to Czech or at least some explanation of what they mean?
          >Thanks a lot in advance.
          >Best regards,
          >Jaroslav Hejzlar
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • wustpisk
          I m sure it refers to the checkout when purchasing on-line. I have seen cart but it is jarring to one s ears as it looks like go-kart or horse and
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
            I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart' or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.
            For example Amazon uses 'cart' in their US version, and 'basket' in the .co.uk version.

            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear friends,
            > I need your help with the term “checkout or carts” in the context of educational equipment:
            >
            > ...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks available for students as necessary (checkout or carts)
            >
            > Can you please provide me with some suggestions how to translate this to Czech or at least some explanation of what they mean?
            > Thanks a lot in advance.
            > Best regards,
            > Jaroslav Hejzlar
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • (no author)
            Right, I think we discussed cart/checkout/basket before, but the problem Jarda has here that there s no online shopping involved here.. I suspect it s from a
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
              Right, I think we discussed cart/checkout/basket before, but the
              problem Jarda has here that there's no online shopping involved here..

              I suspect it's from a quote for some sort of training course, students
              either get a Mac book each for the duration, OR they get one only when
              needed - and the checkout or carts PROBABLY (in my mind) refer to some
              sort of reservation and checkout system for the computers??? but why
              checkout OR carts?

              M
              ------ Original Message ------
              From: "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...>
              To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: 12.10.2012 11:23:35
              Subject: [Czechlist] Re: HELP - TERM: checkout or carts
              > I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have
              >seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart'
              >or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned
              >term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.
              >For example Amazon uses 'cart' in their US version, and 'basket' in
              >the .co.uk version.
              >
              >--- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@...>
              >wrote:
              >>
              >> Dear friends,
              >> I need your help with the term “checkout or carts” in the
              >context of educational equipment:
              >>
              >> ...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks available for
              >students as necessary (checkout or carts)
              >>
              >> Can you please provide me with some suggestions how to translate
              >this to Czech or at least some explanation of what they mean?
              >> Thanks a lot in advance.
              >> Best regards,
              >> Jaroslav Hejzlar
              >>
              >>
              >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • James Kirchner
              It s got nothing to do with online shopping! It is saying that there are two choices: 1. Each kid can go to the school s media center, sign as the temporary
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
                It's got nothing to do with online shopping!

                It is saying that there are two choices:

                1. Each kid can go to the school's media center, sign as the temporary recipient of a laptop, and then he has use of it for a specific time, and maybe can even take it home. Then he has to return it. In the US we check out library books, and the "pult" where we do this is the checkout desk.

                2. The school's computer or audio-visual person wheels a cart filled with laptops into the classroom at a time designated by the teacher. The kids use them for a specific length of time, and then they put them all back on the cart and the guy comes back and takes the cart away.

                I am 100% sure that this is what it means.

                Jamie
                (who works in the US educational system)

                On Oct 12, 2012, at 5:23 AM, wustpisk wrote:

                > I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart' or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.
                > For example Amazon uses 'cart' in their US version, and 'basket' in the .co.uk version.
                >
                > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@...> wrote:
                >>
                >> Dear friends,
                >> I need your help with the term "checkout or carts" in the context of educational equipment:
                >>
                >> ...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks available for students as necessary (checkout or carts)
                >>
                >> Can you please provide me with some suggestions how to translate this to Czech or at least some explanation of what they mean?
                >> Thanks a lot in advance.
                >> Best regards,
                >> Jaroslav Hejzlar
                >>
                >>
                >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >>
                >
                >
                > _______________________________________________
                > Czechlist mailing list
                > Czechlist@...
                > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


                _______________________________________________
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              • wustpisk
                Just making sure you were awake :)
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
                  Just making sure you were awake :)

                  --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > It's got nothing to do with online shopping!
                  >
                  > It is saying that there are two choices:
                  >
                  > 1. Each kid can go to the school's media center, sign as the temporary recipient of a laptop, and then he has use of it for a specific time, and maybe can even take it home. Then he has to return it. In the US we check out library books, and the "pult" where we do this is the checkout desk.
                  >
                  > 2. The school's computer or audio-visual person wheels a cart filled with laptops into the classroom at a time designated by the teacher. The kids use them for a specific length of time, and then they put them all back on the cart and the guy comes back and takes the cart away.
                  >
                  > I am 100% sure that this is what it means.
                  >
                  > Jamie
                  > (who works in the US educational system)
                  >
                  > On Oct 12, 2012, at 5:23 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                  >
                  > > I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart' or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.
                  > > For example Amazon uses 'cart' in their US version, and 'basket' in the .co.uk version.
                  > >
                  > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@> wrote:
                  > >>
                  > >> Dear friends,
                  > >> I need your help with the term "checkout or carts" in the context of educational equipment:
                  > >>
                  > >> ...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks available for students as necessary (checkout or carts)
                  > >>
                  > >> Can you please provide me with some suggestions how to translate this to Czech or at least some explanation of what they mean?
                  > >> Thanks a lot in advance.
                  > >> Best regards,
                  > >> Jaroslav Hejzlar
                  > >>
                  > >>
                  > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >>
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > _______________________________________________
                  > > Czechlist mailing list
                  > > Czechlist@...
                  > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >
                  >
                  > _______________________________________________
                  > Czechlist mailing list
                  > Czechlist@...
                  > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >
                • James Kirchner
                  Meanwhile, in the UK they use the term trolley , which sounds like there are steel tracks running through the aisles of the supermarket on which 1890s trams
                  Message 8 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
                    Meanwhile, in the UK they use the term "trolley", which sounds like there are steel tracks running through the aisles of the supermarket on which 1890s trams rumble back and forth while their driver pulls a strap to ring a bell. Nothing can be quainter or more old-fashioned than that.

                    This is your cue to link to a BBC article that attests to Americans being fat and stupid.

                    Jamie

                    On Oct 12, 2012, at 8:10 AM, wustpisk wrote:

                    >>> I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart' or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.

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                  • wustpisk
                    You said it :) Where I live trolleys are underpants. I use a basket when I go shopping.
                    Message 9 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
                      You said it :)

                      Where I live trolleys are underpants.

                      I use a basket when I go shopping.

                      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Meanwhile, in the UK they use the term "trolley", which sounds like there are steel tracks running through the aisles of the supermarket on which 1890s trams rumble back and forth while their driver pulls a strap to ring a bell. Nothing can be quainter or more old-fashioned than that.
                      >
                      > This is your cue to link to a BBC article that attests to Americans being fat and stupid.
                      >
                      > Jamie
                      >
                      > On Oct 12, 2012, at 8:10 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                      >
                      > >>> I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart' or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.
                      >
                      > _______________________________________________
                      > Czechlist mailing list
                      > Czechlist@...
                      > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      >
                    • James Kirchner
                      We also use baskets, but they don t have wheels. Actually some people call shopping carts shopping baskets even if they do have wheels. JK ...
                      Message 10 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
                        We also use baskets, but they don't have wheels. Actually some people call shopping carts shopping baskets even if they do have wheels.

                        JK

                        On Oct 12, 2012, at 8:41 AM, wustpisk wrote:

                        > You said it :)
                        >
                        > Where I live trolleys are underpants.
                        >
                        > I use a basket when I go shopping.
                        >
                        > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                        >>
                        >> Meanwhile, in the UK they use the term "trolley", which sounds like there are steel tracks running through the aisles of the supermarket on which 1890s trams rumble back and forth while their driver pulls a strap to ring a bell. Nothing can be quainter or more old-fashioned than that.
                        >>
                        >> This is your cue to link to a BBC article that attests to Americans being fat and stupid.
                        >>
                        >> Jamie
                        >>
                        >> On Oct 12, 2012, at 8:10 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                        >>
                        >>>>> I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart' or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.
                        >>
                        >> _______________________________________________
                        >> Czechlist mailing list
                        >> Czechlist@...
                        >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >>
                        >
                        >
                        > _______________________________________________
                        > Czechlist mailing list
                        > Czechlist@...
                        > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


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                      • wustpisk
                        Oh yes - you ve got to have wheels on your shopping basket. it gets a bit heavy otherwise. Shopping cart conjures up the image of a giant shire horse
                        Message 11 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
                          Oh yes - you've got to have wheels on your shopping basket. it gets a bit heavy otherwise.

                          Shopping cart conjures up the image of a giant shire horse clip-clopping around Aldi :) Quaint, but might become necessary with a growing family ... http://www.ashendhouse.fsnet.co.uk/shire/photos/cart.jpg

                          Don't get me wrong, it's quite nice that you've kept hold of some more old-fashioned sayings on your side of the pond.

                          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > We also use baskets, but they don't have wheels. Actually some people call shopping carts shopping baskets even if they do have wheels.
                          >
                          > JK
                          >
                          > On Oct 12, 2012, at 8:41 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                          >
                          > > You said it :)
                          > >
                          > > Where I live trolleys are underpants.
                          > >
                          > > I use a basket when I go shopping.
                          > >
                          > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >> Meanwhile, in the UK they use the term "trolley", which sounds like there are steel tracks running through the aisles of the supermarket on which 1890s trams rumble back and forth while their driver pulls a strap to ring a bell. Nothing can be quainter or more old-fashioned than that.
                          > >>
                          > >> This is your cue to link to a BBC article that attests to Americans being fat and stupid.
                          > >>
                          > >> Jamie
                          > >>
                          > >> On Oct 12, 2012, at 8:10 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >>>>> I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart' or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.
                          > >>
                          > >> _______________________________________________
                          > >> Czechlist mailing list
                          > >> Czechlist@
                          > >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > _______________________________________________
                          > > Czechlist mailing list
                          > > Czechlist@...
                          > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >
                          >
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Czechlist mailing list
                          > Czechlist@...
                          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >
                        • Jaroslav Hejzlar
                          Hi! Thanks a lot, Jamie (and also thank you, Matěj, Jakub and Gerry)! I expected something like that but I was not quite sure. Your explanation is very
                          Message 12 of 16 , Oct 12, 2012
                            Hi!
                            Thanks a lot, Jamie (and also thank you, Matěj, Jakub and Gerry)!
                            I expected something like that but I was not quite sure. Your explanation is very helpful. I hope now I will manage to invent some short translations for both the terms.
                            Enjoy the rest of the day (although the weather is not very nice)!
                            Regards,
                            Jarda

                            From: James Kirchner
                            Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 2:09 PM
                            To: czechlist@...
                            Subject: Re: [Czechlist] HELP - TERM: checkout or carts


                            It's got nothing to do with online shopping!

                            It is saying that there are two choices:

                            1. Each kid can go to the school's media center, sign as the temporary recipient of a laptop, and then he has use of it for a specific time, and maybe can even take it home. Then he has to return it. In the US we check out library books, and the "pult" where we do this is the checkout desk.

                            2. The school's computer or audio-visual person wheels a cart filled with laptops into the classroom at a time designated by the teacher. The kids use them for a specific length of time, and then they put them all back on the cart and the guy comes back and takes the cart away.

                            I am 100% sure that this is what it means.

                            Jamie
                            (who works in the US educational system)

                            On Oct 12, 2012, at 5:23 AM, wustpisk wrote:

                            > I'm sure it refers to the 'checkout' when purchasing on-line. I have seen 'cart' but it is jarring to one's ears as it looks like 'go-kart' or 'horse and cart'. I think in the US they use this old-fashioned term - it is slightly quaint, but that's what they say.
                            > For example Amazon uses 'cart' in their US version, and 'basket' in the .co.uk version.
                            >
                            > --- In mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com, "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@...> wrote:
                            >>
                            >> Dear friends,
                            >> I need your help with the term "checkout or carts" in the context of educational equipment:
                            >>
                            >> ...Mac notebooks for each student OR notebooks available for students as necessary (checkout or carts)
                            >>
                            >> Can you please provide me with some suggestions how to translate this to Czech or at least some explanation of what they mean?
                            >> Thanks a lot in advance.
                            >> Best regards,
                            >> Jaroslav Hejzlar
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >>
                            >
                            >
                            > _______________________________________________
                            > Czechlist mailing list
                            > mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org
                            > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist

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                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • James Kirchner
                            What do Czech call a widow in the typographical sense? It s a single word left alone on the last line of a paragraph. Jamie
                            Message 13 of 16 , Oct 14, 2012
                              What do Czech call a "widow" in the typographical sense? It's a single word left alone on the last line of a paragraph.

                              Jamie


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                            • wustpisk
                              I believe the term is, funnily enough, vdova , and is understood by those in the trade. Or Visici radek , less succinctly: vychodovy radek jako prvni radek
                              Message 14 of 16 , Oct 14, 2012
                                I believe the term is, funnily enough, 'vdova', and is understood by those in the trade.

                                Or 'Visici radek', less succinctly: 'vychodovy radek jako prvni radek ve sloupci sazby.', 'zarazkovy radek jako posledni radek ve sloupci sazby', 'radek odstavce na konci stranky' etc

                                Then there is a 'syrotek' as well ...

                                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > What do Czech call a "widow" in the typographical sense? It's a single word left alone on the last line of a paragraph.
                                >
                                > Jamie
                                >
                                >
                                > _______________________________________________
                                > Czechlist mailing list
                                > Czechlist@...
                                > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                                >
                              • James Kirchner
                                Thanks, Gerry. When I was living there, I found that the typesetters I dealt with didn t know terms like this. Plus, there were no standard proofreader s
                                Message 15 of 16 , Oct 14, 2012
                                  Thanks, Gerry. When I was living there, I found that the typesetters I dealt with didn't know terms like this. Plus, there were no standard proofreader's marks that I could find. Very frustrating.

                                  Jamie

                                  On Oct 14, 2012, at 6:46 PM, wustpisk wrote:

                                  > I believe the term is, funnily enough, 'vdova', and is understood by those in the trade.
                                  >
                                  > Or 'Visici radek', less succinctly: 'vychodovy radek jako prvni radek ve sloupci sazby.', 'zarazkovy radek jako posledni radek ve sloupci sazby', 'radek odstavce na konci stranky' etc
                                  >
                                  > Then there is a 'syrotek' as well ...
                                  >
                                  > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                                  >>
                                  >> What do Czech call a "widow" in the typographical sense? It's a single word left alone on the last line of a paragraph.
                                  >>
                                  >> Jamie
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >> _______________________________________________
                                  >> Czechlist mailing list
                                  >> Czechlist@...
                                  >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                                  >>
                                  >
                                  > _______________________________________________
                                  > Czechlist mailing list
                                  > Czechlist@...
                                  > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


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                                • Pilucha, Jiri
                                  Vdova, indeed. See for instance http://web.quick.cz/iveta_kulhava/Typografie/Slovnicek.htm#vdova By the way, the proofreader s marks currently used were
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Oct 14, 2012
                                    Vdova, indeed.

                                    See for instance
                                    http://web.quick.cz/iveta_kulhava/Typografie/Slovnicek.htm#vdova

                                    By the way, the proofreader's marks currently used were standardized as far back as the 1960s and there was never any problem looking them up under CSN 88 0410.

                                    Jiri


                                    From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of James Kirchner
                                    Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 12:56 AM
                                    To: czechlist@...
                                    Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "widow"



                                    Thanks, Gerry. When I was living there, I found that the typesetters I dealt with didn't know terms like this. Plus, there were no standard proofreader's marks that I could find. Very frustrating.

                                    Jamie

                                    On Oct 14, 2012, at 6:46 PM, wustpisk wrote:

                                    > I believe the term is, funnily enough, 'vdova', and is understood by those in the trade.
                                    >
                                    > Or 'Visici radek', less succinctly: 'vychodovy radek jako prvni radek ve sloupci sazby.', 'zarazkovy radek jako posledni radek ve sloupci sazby', 'radek odstavce na konci stranky' etc
                                    >
                                    > Then there is a 'syrotek' as well ...
                                    >
                                    > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>, James Kirchner <czechlist@...<mailto:czechlist@...>> wrote:
                                    >>
                                    >> What do Czech call a "widow" in the typographical sense? It's a single word left alone on the last line of a paragraph.
                                    >>
                                    >> Jamie
                                    >>
                                    >>
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                                    >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                                    >>
                                    >
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