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Re: [Czechlist] RE: grammar

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  • Jirka Bolech
    ... My suggestion: I ll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a completed
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
      > … or perhaps another example a bit more complicated…

      My suggestion: "I'll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have
      found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a
      completed action or event.

      Jirka Bolech
    • Charlie Stanford Translations
      I d put If (and when) I find something I ll let you know what I ve found But you could use I ll let you know if I find something We ll all be tying
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
        I'd put "If (and when) I find something I'll let you know what I've found"
        But you could use "I'll let you know if I find something"
        We'll all be tying ourselves in grammatical knots in a minute I am sure


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Pilucha, Jiri
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:11 PM
        Subject: [Czechlist] RE: grammar



        … or perhaps another example a bit more complicated…

        Az neco najdu, dam ti vedet, co jsem nasel

        Thanks a lot
        Jiri

        From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Pilucha, Jiri
        Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:05 PM
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Czechlist] grammar



        I am totally embarassed and ashamed of myself to be asking such a 001 question, but what is the right tense here please:
        I‘ll let you know what I find/have found/found
        Thanks
        Jiri

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Pilucha, Jiri
        Jirko, it may theoretically make sense but I suspect that nobody would in practice use a construction like that… or would they? From:
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
          Jirko, it may theoretically make sense but I suspect that nobody would in practice use a construction like that… or would they?

          From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jirka Bolech
          Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:19 PM
          To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Czechlist] RE: grammar



          > … or perhaps another example a bit more complicated…

          My suggestion: "I'll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have
          found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a
          completed action or event.

          Jirka Bolech



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • czechlist@czechlist.org
          I ll let you know what I find - the most usual. I ll let you know what I ve found - this either means (as someone said - can t find who it was now) that I ve
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
            I'll let you know what I find - the most usual.

            I'll let you know what I've found - this either means (as someone said -
            can't find who it was now) that I've already found the thing but I'm not
            telling you what it is, or (as Jamie said) that I'm thinking about the
            finding as a completed action, something that's under my belt. What I've
            managed to find, maybe.

            (Use the verb "cook" instead, and the difference is more apparent:
            "I'll let you know what I cook."
            "I'll let you know what I've cooked.")

            You can't, however, say "I'll let you know what I will have found."

            (OK, am now trying to think of an extremely improbable situation in which
            you could say that. Maybe Melvyn will be along in a minute to think of one
            :))

            Valerie

            > Jirko, it may theoretically make sense but I suspect that nobody would in
            > practice use a construction like that... or would they?
            >
            > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On
            > Behalf Of Jirka Bolech
            > Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:19 PM
            > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] RE: grammar
            >
            >
            >
            >> ... or perhaps another example a bit more complicated...
            >
            > My suggestion: "I'll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have
            > found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a
            > completed action or event.
            >
            > Jirka Bolech
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > _______________________________________________
            > Czechlist mailing list
            > Czechlist@...
            > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >

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          • czechlist@czechlist.org
            You could only use what I will have found in this way (with an emphasis on the will): I won t have found x by next week. What I will have found will be an
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
              You could only use "what I will have found" in this way (with an emphasis
              on the will):

              I won't have found x by next week. What I will have found will be an
              assortment of useless objects.

              The equivalent after "I'll let you know" would be "I'll let you know what
              I do find."

              Valerie

              > I'll let you know what I find - the most usual.
              >
              > I'll let you know what I've found - this either means (as someone said -
              > can't find who it was now) that I've already found the thing but I'm not
              > telling you what it is, or (as Jamie said) that I'm thinking about the
              > finding as a completed action, something that's under my belt. What I've
              > managed to find, maybe.
              >
              > (Use the verb "cook" instead, and the difference is more apparent:
              > "I'll let you know what I cook."
              > "I'll let you know what I've cooked.")
              >
              > You can't, however, say "I'll let you know what I will have found."
              >
              > (OK, am now trying to think of an extremely improbable situation in which
              > you could say that. Maybe Melvyn will be along in a minute to think of one
              > :))
              >
              > Valerie
              >
              >> Jirko, it may theoretically make sense but I suspect that nobody would
              >> in
              >> practice use a construction like that... or would they?
              >>
              >> From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On
              >> Behalf Of Jirka Bolech
              >> Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:19 PM
              >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
              >> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] RE: grammar
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>> ... or perhaps another example a bit more complicated...
              >>
              >> My suggestion: "I'll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have
              >> found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a
              >> completed action or event.
              >>
              >> Jirka Bolech
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>
              >> _______________________________________________
              >> Czechlist mailing list
              >> Czechlist@...
              >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >>
              >
              > _______________________________________________
              > Czechlist mailing list
              > Czechlist@...
              > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >


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            • Melvyn
              ... When I find something I’ll let you know (what). :-) To go back to your first sentence: I’ll let you know what I find/have found/found Basically, what
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Pilucha, Jiri" <jiri.pilucha@...> wrote:
                >Az neco najdu, dam ti vedet, co jsem nasel

                When I find something I’ll let you know (what). :-)

                To go back to your first sentence:
                I’ll let you know what I find/have found/found

                Basically, what Jamie said.

                I would dissuade students from using ‘will have found’ here. The “will” is quite redundant in all but the most contrived cases IMO.
                :-)

                I agree that #3 is much more unlikely, but yes, I can think of a case where it might well be acceptable, e.g. if today is Wednesday, I’ll be doing a search on Thursday and I’ll report back to you on Friday then on Friday I will let you know what I found on Thursday (because it is normally bad form to use the present perfect with the day before and similar time expressions). A better example might be:

                My birthday is on Friday but I will not see you till Saturday, so:
                On Saturday I’ll let you know what I got/received for my birthday on Friday (the present perfect would be wrong here IMO)

                BR

                M.
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