Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

grammar

Expand Messages
  • Pilucha, Jiri
    I am totally embarassed and ashamed of myself to be asking such a 001 question, but what is the right tense here please: I‘ll let you know what I find/have
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      I am totally embarassed and ashamed of myself to be asking such a 001 question, but what is the right tense here please:
      I‘ll let you know what I find/have found/found
      Thanks
      Jiri


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • wustpisk
      No need to be embarrassed about it - even I don t know. For what it s worth I don t think you can use the third option. I m sure there s somebody out there who
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        No need to be embarrassed about it - even I don't know.

        For what it's worth I don't think you can use the third option.

        I'm sure there's somebody out there who will give you chapter and verse on correct usage, and why :)

        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Pilucha, Jiri" <jiri.pilucha@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am totally embarassed and ashamed of myself to be asking such a 001 question, but what is the right tense here please:
        > I‘ll let you know what I find/have found/found
        > Thanks
        > Jiri
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • James Kirchner
        Both find and have found are correct here, depending on the speaker s point of view. When he says, I ll let you know what I find, he s placing himself in
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Both "find" and "have found" are correct here, depending on the speaker's point of view.

          When he says, "I'll let you know what I find," he's placing himself in the present and viewing the finding as being in the future.

          When he says, "I'll let you know what I have found," he's imagining himself in the future when the finding has already been already completed.

          So both are right, depending on where in time the speaker is picturing himself.

          Jamie

          On Sep 5, 2012, at 9:05 AM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:

          > I am totally embarassed and ashamed of myself to be asking such a 001 question, but what is the right tense here please:
          > I'll let you know what I find/have found/found
          > Thanks
          > Jiri
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > _______________________________________________
          > Czechlist mailing list
          > Czechlist@...
          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


          _______________________________________________
          Czechlist mailing list
          Czechlist@...
          http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        • Pilucha, Jiri
          … or perhaps another example a bit more complicated… Az neco najdu, dam ti vedet, co jsem nasel Thanks a lot Jiri From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            … or perhaps another example a bit more complicated…

            Az neco najdu, dam ti vedet, co jsem nasel

            Thanks a lot
            Jiri

            From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Pilucha, Jiri
            Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:05 PM
            To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Czechlist] grammar



            I am totally embarassed and ashamed of myself to be asking such a 001 question, but what is the right tense here please:
            I‘ll let you know what I find/have found/found
            Thanks
            Jiri

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jirka Bolech
            Hi Jiri, I suppose the context decides. I actually think that the most logical possibility is I ll let you know what I will have found. One of your options,
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Jiri,

              I suppose the context decides. I actually think that the most logical
              possibility is "I'll let you know what I will have found."

              One of your options, "I'll let you know what I have found" sounds like
              you already know what you've found but don't want to or can't tell right
              now. I do imagine a lot of people actually use this wording to mean the
              above though.

              Let's see if the native speakers agree...

              Jirka Bolech
            • Charlie Stanford Translations
              1 or 2 work Jiri. 3 not really. Not a 001 question at all ... From: Pilucha, Jiri To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:05 PM
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                1 or 2 work Jiri. 3 not really. Not a 001 question at all


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Pilucha, Jiri
                To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:05 PM
                Subject: [Czechlist] grammar



                I am totally embarassed and ashamed of myself to be asking such a 001 question, but what is the right tense here please:
                I‘ll let you know what I find/have found/found
                Thanks
                Jiri

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jirka Bolech
                ... My suggestion: I ll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a completed
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  > … or perhaps another example a bit more complicated…

                  My suggestion: "I'll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have
                  found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a
                  completed action or event.

                  Jirka Bolech
                • Charlie Stanford Translations
                  I d put If (and when) I find something I ll let you know what I ve found But you could use I ll let you know if I find something We ll all be tying
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I'd put "If (and when) I find something I'll let you know what I've found"
                    But you could use "I'll let you know if I find something"
                    We'll all be tying ourselves in grammatical knots in a minute I am sure


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Pilucha, Jiri
                    To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:11 PM
                    Subject: [Czechlist] RE: grammar



                    … or perhaps another example a bit more complicated…

                    Az neco najdu, dam ti vedet, co jsem nasel

                    Thanks a lot
                    Jiri

                    From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Pilucha, Jiri
                    Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:05 PM
                    To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [Czechlist] grammar



                    I am totally embarassed and ashamed of myself to be asking such a 001 question, but what is the right tense here please:
                    I‘ll let you know what I find/have found/found
                    Thanks
                    Jiri

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Pilucha, Jiri
                    Jirko, it may theoretically make sense but I suspect that nobody would in practice use a construction like that… or would they? From:
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Jirko, it may theoretically make sense but I suspect that nobody would in practice use a construction like that… or would they?

                      From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jirka Bolech
                      Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:19 PM
                      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] RE: grammar



                      > … or perhaps another example a bit more complicated…

                      My suggestion: "I'll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have
                      found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a
                      completed action or event.

                      Jirka Bolech



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • czechlist@czechlist.org
                      I ll let you know what I find - the most usual. I ll let you know what I ve found - this either means (as someone said - can t find who it was now) that I ve
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I'll let you know what I find - the most usual.

                        I'll let you know what I've found - this either means (as someone said -
                        can't find who it was now) that I've already found the thing but I'm not
                        telling you what it is, or (as Jamie said) that I'm thinking about the
                        finding as a completed action, something that's under my belt. What I've
                        managed to find, maybe.

                        (Use the verb "cook" instead, and the difference is more apparent:
                        "I'll let you know what I cook."
                        "I'll let you know what I've cooked.")

                        You can't, however, say "I'll let you know what I will have found."

                        (OK, am now trying to think of an extremely improbable situation in which
                        you could say that. Maybe Melvyn will be along in a minute to think of one
                        :))

                        Valerie

                        > Jirko, it may theoretically make sense but I suspect that nobody would in
                        > practice use a construction like that... or would they?
                        >
                        > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On
                        > Behalf Of Jirka Bolech
                        > Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:19 PM
                        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] RE: grammar
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >> ... or perhaps another example a bit more complicated...
                        >
                        > My suggestion: "I'll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have
                        > found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a
                        > completed action or event.
                        >
                        > Jirka Bolech
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        > _______________________________________________
                        > Czechlist mailing list
                        > Czechlist@...
                        > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >

                        _______________________________________________
                        Czechlist mailing list
                        Czechlist@...
                        http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      • czechlist@czechlist.org
                        You could only use what I will have found in this way (with an emphasis on the will): I won t have found x by next week. What I will have found will be an
                        Message 11 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment
                          You could only use "what I will have found" in this way (with an emphasis
                          on the will):

                          I won't have found x by next week. What I will have found will be an
                          assortment of useless objects.

                          The equivalent after "I'll let you know" would be "I'll let you know what
                          I do find."

                          Valerie

                          > I'll let you know what I find - the most usual.
                          >
                          > I'll let you know what I've found - this either means (as someone said -
                          > can't find who it was now) that I've already found the thing but I'm not
                          > telling you what it is, or (as Jamie said) that I'm thinking about the
                          > finding as a completed action, something that's under my belt. What I've
                          > managed to find, maybe.
                          >
                          > (Use the verb "cook" instead, and the difference is more apparent:
                          > "I'll let you know what I cook."
                          > "I'll let you know what I've cooked.")
                          >
                          > You can't, however, say "I'll let you know what I will have found."
                          >
                          > (OK, am now trying to think of an extremely improbable situation in which
                          > you could say that. Maybe Melvyn will be along in a minute to think of one
                          > :))
                          >
                          > Valerie
                          >
                          >> Jirko, it may theoretically make sense but I suspect that nobody would
                          >> in
                          >> practice use a construction like that... or would they?
                          >>
                          >> From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On
                          >> Behalf Of Jirka Bolech
                          >> Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2012 3:19 PM
                          >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                          >> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] RE: grammar
                          >>
                          >>
                          >>
                          >>> ... or perhaps another example a bit more complicated...
                          >>
                          >> My suggestion: "I'll let you know what I will have found when (a) I have
                          >> found it OR (b) when I find it. I think (a) is better to indicate a
                          >> completed action or event.
                          >>
                          >> Jirka Bolech
                          >>
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >>
                          >> _______________________________________________
                          >> Czechlist mailing list
                          >> Czechlist@...
                          >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >>
                          >
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Czechlist mailing list
                          > Czechlist@...
                          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >


                          _______________________________________________
                          Czechlist mailing list
                          Czechlist@...
                          http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        • Melvyn
                          ... When I find something I’ll let you know (what). :-) To go back to your first sentence: I’ll let you know what I find/have found/found Basically, what
                          Message 12 of 12 , Sep 5, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Pilucha, Jiri" <jiri.pilucha@...> wrote:
                            >Az neco najdu, dam ti vedet, co jsem nasel

                            When I find something I’ll let you know (what). :-)

                            To go back to your first sentence:
                            I’ll let you know what I find/have found/found

                            Basically, what Jamie said.

                            I would dissuade students from using ‘will have found’ here. The “will” is quite redundant in all but the most contrived cases IMO.
                            :-)

                            I agree that #3 is much more unlikely, but yes, I can think of a case where it might well be acceptable, e.g. if today is Wednesday, I’ll be doing a search on Thursday and I’ll report back to you on Friday then on Friday I will let you know what I found on Thursday (because it is normally bad form to use the present perfect with the day before and similar time expressions). A better example might be:

                            My birthday is on Friday but I will not see you till Saturday, so:
                            On Saturday I’ll let you know what I got/received for my birthday on Friday (the present perfect would be wrong here IMO)

                            BR

                            M.
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.