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RE: [Czechlist] "Tak, ja jdu!"

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  • vtalacko@ageng.pair.com
    That s the point - a literal translation doesn t work. I think the reason is that when you say in English I m going, the natural stress patterns of the
    Message 1 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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      That's the point - a literal translation doesn't work.

      I think the reason is that when you say in English "I'm going," the
      natural stress patterns of the language mean that the stress falls on the
      going and puts too much emphasis on it - I'm GOING. Whereas "Tak ja jdu",
      wit its more balanced stress, doesn't suffer from that problem.

      I'd translate it as I should be going, or I must be going (not I'm out of
      here, because that pretty often has negative overtones). I've got to get
      going is useful, too.


      > "Tak ja jdu" as such does not by any means imply that you're leaving as a
      > result of being offended or you're p*ssed off or you're looking for an
      > excuse to leave. No need to read anything like that into it. It's a simple
      > statement: I must be going. I am out of here.
      >
      >
      > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of James Kirchner
      > Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2012 5:04 PM
      > To: czechlist@...
      > Subject: [Czechlist] "Tak, ja jdu!"
      >
      >
      >
      > I know a lot of this would depend on the context, but I'm interested in
      > some other translators' ideas of how to translate, "Tak, ja jdu!" in a
      > culturally appropriate way at the end of a conversation.
      >
      > If you translate it literally into English, it can either sound like,
      > "I've had enough of this conversation," or, "Okay, I get the message. I'll
      > leave."
      >
      > I suppose you could say, "Well, I must be going," or, "I'm sorry, but I
      > have to leave right now." Americans would offer an elaborate excuse that
      > Czechs don't require.
      >
      > Any other ideas about how to translate it when no excuse is offered?
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > _______________________________________________
      > Czechlist mailing list
      > Czechlist@...<mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
      > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
    • vtalacko@ageng.pair.com
      You can say OK, I m off, though, and it sounds OK (maybe not AmE).
      Message 2 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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        You can say "OK, I'm off," though, and it sounds OK (maybe not AmE).

        > That's the point - a literal translation doesn't work.
        >
        > I think the reason is that when you say in English "I'm going," the
        > natural stress patterns of the language mean that the stress falls on the
        > going and puts too much emphasis on it - I'm GOING. Whereas "Tak ja jdu",
        > wit its more balanced stress, doesn't suffer from that problem.
        >
        > I'd translate it as I should be going, or I must be going (not I'm out of
        > here, because that pretty often has negative overtones). I've got to get
        > going is useful, too.
        >
        >
        >> "Tak ja jdu" as such does not by any means imply that you're leaving as
        >> a
        >> result of being offended or you're p*ssed off or you're looking for an
        >> excuse to leave. No need to read anything like that into it. It's a
        >> simple
        >> statement: I must be going. I am out of here.
        >>
        >>
        >> From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On
        >> Behalf Of James Kirchner
        >> Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2012 5:04 PM
        >> To: czechlist@...
        >> Subject: [Czechlist] "Tak, ja jdu!"
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> I know a lot of this would depend on the context, but I'm interested in
        >> some other translators' ideas of how to translate, "Tak, ja jdu!" in a
        >> culturally appropriate way at the end of a conversation.
        >>
        >> If you translate it literally into English, it can either sound like,
        >> "I've had enough of this conversation," or, "Okay, I get the message.
        >> I'll
        >> leave."
        >>
        >> I suppose you could say, "Well, I must be going," or, "I'm sorry, but I
        >> have to leave right now." Americans would offer an elaborate excuse that
        >> Czechs don't require.
        >>
        >> Any other ideas about how to translate it when no excuse is offered?
        >>
        >> Jamie
        >>
        >> _______________________________________________
        >> Czechlist mailing list
        >> Czechlist@...<mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
        >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
      • wustpisk
        I ll get me coat ... :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfJAHASV8k8 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F5wtk4msfU&feature=related
        Message 3 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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          I'll get me coat ... :)

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfJAHASV8k8
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F5wtk4msfU&feature=related
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3OM2MA1pic&feature=related

          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, vtalacko@... wrote:
          >
          > That's the point - a literal translation doesn't work.
          >
          > I think the reason is that when you say in English "I'm going," the
          > natural stress patterns of the language mean that the stress falls on the
          > going and puts too much emphasis on it - I'm GOING. Whereas "Tak ja jdu",
          > wit its more balanced stress, doesn't suffer from that problem.
          >
          > I'd translate it as I should be going, or I must be going (not I'm out of
          > here, because that pretty often has negative overtones). I've got to get
          > going is useful, too.
          >
          >
          > > "Tak ja jdu" as such does not by any means imply that you're leaving as a
          > > result of being offended or you're p*ssed off or you're looking for an
          > > excuse to leave. No need to read anything like that into it. It's a simple
          > > statement: I must be going. I am out of here.
          > >
          > >
          > > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On
          > > Behalf Of James Kirchner
          > > Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2012 5:04 PM
          > > To: czechlist@...
          > > Subject: [Czechlist] "Tak, ja jdu!"
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I know a lot of this would depend on the context, but I'm interested in
          > > some other translators' ideas of how to translate, "Tak, ja jdu!" in a
          > > culturally appropriate way at the end of a conversation.
          > >
          > > If you translate it literally into English, it can either sound like,
          > > "I've had enough of this conversation," or, "Okay, I get the message. I'll
          > > leave."
          > >
          > > I suppose you could say, "Well, I must be going," or, "I'm sorry, but I
          > > have to leave right now." Americans would offer an elaborate excuse that
          > > Czechs don't require.
          > >
          > > Any other ideas about how to translate it when no excuse is offered?
          > >
          > > Jamie
          > >
          > > _______________________________________________
          > > Czechlist mailing list
          > > Czechlist@...<mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
          > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Pilucha, Jiri
          Yes, I was wrong with „I’m ouf of here“. (Interestingly enough, online definitions mostly don’t indicate or warn you against these negative overtones
          Message 4 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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            Yes, I was wrong with „I’m ouf of here“.

            (Interestingly enough, online definitions mostly don’t indicate or warn you against these negative overtones
            Such as
            http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/i'm+out+of+here
            http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=I'm%20outta%20here
            http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/I'm+out+of+here

            But dictionaries are rarely correct.)


            From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of vtalacko@...
            Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 2:30 PM
            To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [Czechlist] "Tak, ja jdu!"



            That's the point - a literal translation doesn't work.

            I think the reason is that when you say in English "I'm going," the
            natural stress patterns of the language mean that the stress falls on the
            going and puts too much emphasis on it - I'm GOING. Whereas "Tak ja jdu",
            wit its more balanced stress, doesn't suffer from that problem.

            I'd translate it as I should be going, or I must be going (not I'm out of
            here, because that pretty often has negative overtones). I've got to get
            going is useful, too.

            > "Tak ja jdu" as such does not by any means imply that you're leaving as a
            > result of being offended or you're p*ssed off or you're looking for an
            > excuse to leave. No need to read anything like that into it. It's a simple
            > statement: I must be going. I am out of here.
            >
            >
            > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>] On
            > Behalf Of James Kirchner
            > Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2012 5:04 PM
            > To: czechlist@...<mailto:czechlist%40czechlist.org>
            > Subject: [Czechlist] "Tak, ja jdu!"
            >
            >
            >
            > I know a lot of this would depend on the context, but I'm interested in
            > some other translators' ideas of how to translate, "Tak, ja jdu!" in a
            > culturally appropriate way at the end of a conversation.
            >
            > If you translate it literally into English, it can either sound like,
            > "I've had enough of this conversation," or, "Okay, I get the message. I'll
            > leave."
            >
            > I suppose you could say, "Well, I must be going," or, "I'm sorry, but I
            > have to leave right now." Americans would offer an elaborate excuse that
            > Czechs don't require.
            >
            > Any other ideas about how to translate it when no excuse is offered?
            >
            > Jamie
            >
            > _______________________________________________
            > Czechlist mailing list
            > Czechlist@...<mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org><mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
            > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • vtalacko@ageng.pair.com
            haha, I was just thinking of that! Actually, forget I need to get going. It sounds a bit like you re accusing the other person of holding you up. Only really
            Message 5 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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              haha, I was just thinking of that!

              Actually, forget "I need to get going." It sounds a bit like you're
              accusing the other person of holding you up. Only really works as a
              self-reprimand - "whoops, I've been surfing the net for the last hour, I
              need to get going."


              > I'll get me coat ... :)
              >
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfJAHASV8k8
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F5wtk4msfU&feature=related
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3OM2MA1pic&feature=related
              >
              > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, vtalacko@... wrote:
              >>
              >> That's the point - a literal translation doesn't work.
              >>
              >> I think the reason is that when you say in English "I'm going," the
              >> natural stress patterns of the language mean that the stress falls on
              >> the
              >> going and puts too much emphasis on it - I'm GOING. Whereas "Tak ja
              >> jdu",
              >> wit its more balanced stress, doesn't suffer from that problem.
              >>
              >> I'd translate it as I should be going, or I must be going (not I'm out
              >> of
              >> here, because that pretty often has negative overtones). I've got to get
              >> going is useful, too.
              >>
              >>
              >> > "Tak ja jdu" as such does not by any means imply that you're leaving
              >> as a
              >> > result of being offended or you're p*ssed off or you're looking for an
              >> > excuse to leave. No need to read anything like that into it. It's a
              >> simple
              >> > statement: I must be going. I am out of here.
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On
              >> > Behalf Of James Kirchner
              >> > Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2012 5:04 PM
              >> > To: czechlist@...
              >> > Subject: [Czechlist] "Tak, ja jdu!"
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > I know a lot of this would depend on the context, but I'm interested
              >> in
              >> > some other translators' ideas of how to translate, "Tak, ja jdu!" in a
              >> > culturally appropriate way at the end of a conversation.
              >> >
              >> > If you translate it literally into English, it can either sound like,
              >> > "I've had enough of this conversation," or, "Okay, I get the message.
              >> I'll
              >> > leave."
              >> >
              >> > I suppose you could say, "Well, I must be going," or, "I'm sorry, but
              >> I
              >> > have to leave right now." Americans would offer an elaborate excuse
              >> that
              >> > Czechs don't require.
              >> >
              >> > Any other ideas about how to translate it when no excuse is offered?
              >> >
              >> > Jamie
              >> >
              >> > _______________________________________________
              >> > Czechlist mailing list
              >> > Czechlist@...<mailto:Czechlist%40czechlist.org>
              >> > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >> >
              >> >
              >>
              >
              >
            • James Kirchner
              Dear listmates, A member of our state translator association almost got caught up in one of the translator versions of the Nigerian scam recently, and she
              Message 6 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                Dear listmates,

                A member of our state translator association almost got caught up in one of the translator versions of the Nigerian scam recently, and she wrote me wanting to know how people can tell the original e-mail is fraudulent.

                I look at them with the eyes of an ESL instructor, so I have my ways of detecting them. One of the biggest giveaways is when the grammar and punctuation errors don't match the ethnicity of the name the e-mail is signed with. For example, the name on the bottom of the e-mail might be "Steven Jones", but the mistakes are ones that Arabs typically make, especially the punctuation.

                Plus, I get hundreds of e-mails a week from various project managers around the world -- Germans and French people writing in English, Chinese people writing in German, you name it -- and none of these legitimate project managers make the kinds of writing mistakes you find in those scam e-mails.

                Does anybody on the list have their own method of detecting these that I could pass on to this young woman?

                Jamie


                _______________________________________________
                Czechlist mailing list
                Czechlist@...
                http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
              • Libor Zajíček
                Hi, I encountered just the big deal version (we need to deposit one million on your account). If English, the language tends to be orientally ling-winded. The
                Message 7 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                  Hi,

                  I encountered just the big deal version (we need to deposit one million on
                  your account). If English, the language tends to be orientally ling-winded.
                  The natives like sort of text messaging style or they use a specific
                  written-communication newspeak, specific "catchphrases" the non-English
                  scammers don´t use - they are trying to be polite their own way.


                  What is the translator version?

                  Libor

                  2012/8/30 James Kirchner <czechlist@...>

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  > Dear listmates,
                  >
                  > A member of our state translator association almost got caught up in one
                  > of the translator versions of the Nigerian scam recently, and she wrote me
                  > wanting to know how people can tell the original e-mail is fraudulent.
                  >
                  > I look at them with the eyes of an ESL instructor, so I have my ways of
                  > detecting them. One of the biggest giveaways is when the grammar and
                  > punctuation errors don't match the ethnicity of the name the e-mail is
                  > signed with. For example, the name on the bottom of the e-mail might be
                  > "Steven Jones", but the mistakes are ones that Arabs typically make,
                  > especially the punctuation.
                  >
                  > Plus, I get hundreds of e-mails a week from various project managers
                  > around the world -- Germans and French people writing in English, Chinese
                  > people writing in German, you name it -- and none of these legitimate
                  > project managers make the kinds of writing mistakes you find in those scam
                  > e-mails.
                  >
                  > Does anybody on the list have their own method of detecting these that I
                  > could pass on to this young woman?
                  >
                  > Jamie
                  >
                  > _______________________________________________
                  > Czechlist mailing list
                  > Czechlist@...
                  > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >
                  >



                  --
                  czesko.pl, preloz.me, maven.cz
                  Libor Zajíček <http://about.me>


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • wustpisk
                  I usually apply the duck test http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_test
                  Message 8 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                    I usually apply the duck test

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_test

                    --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear listmates,
                    >
                    > A member of our state translator association almost got caught up in one of the translator versions of the Nigerian scam recently, and she wrote me wanting to know how people can tell the original e-mail is fraudulent.
                    >
                    > I look at them with the eyes of an ESL instructor, so I have my ways of detecting them. One of the biggest giveaways is when the grammar and punctuation errors don't match the ethnicity of the name the e-mail is signed with. For example, the name on the bottom of the e-mail might be "Steven Jones", but the mistakes are ones that Arabs typically make, especially the punctuation.
                    >
                    > Plus, I get hundreds of e-mails a week from various project managers around the world -- Germans and French people writing in English, Chinese people writing in German, you name it -- and none of these legitimate project managers make the kinds of writing mistakes you find in those scam e-mails.
                    >
                    > Does anybody on the list have their own method of detecting these that I could pass on to this young woman?
                    >
                    > Jamie
                    >
                    >
                    > _______________________________________________
                    > Czechlist mailing list
                    > Czechlist@...
                    > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    >
                  • James Kirchner
                    What is the duck test? Jamie ... _______________________________________________ Czechlist mailing list Czechlist@czechlist.org
                    Message 9 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                      What is the duck test?

                      Jamie

                      On Aug 30, 2012, at 9:59 AM, wustpisk wrote:

                      > I usually apply the duck test
                      >
                      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_test
                      >
                      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Dear listmates,
                      >>
                      >> A member of our state translator association almost got caught up in one of the translator versions of the Nigerian scam recently, and she wrote me wanting to know how people can tell the original e-mail is fraudulent.
                      >>
                      >> I look at them with the eyes of an ESL instructor, so I have my ways of detecting them. One of the biggest giveaways is when the grammar and punctuation errors don't match the ethnicity of the name the e-mail is signed with. For example, the name on the bottom of the e-mail might be "Steven Jones", but the mistakes are ones that Arabs typically make, especially the punctuation.
                      >>
                      >> Plus, I get hundreds of e-mails a week from various project managers around the world -- Germans and French people writing in English, Chinese people writing in German, you name it -- and none of these legitimate project managers make the kinds of writing mistakes you find in those scam e-mails.
                      >>
                      >> Does anybody on the list have their own method of detecting these that I could pass on to this young woman?
                      >>
                      >> Jamie
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> _______________________________________________
                      >> Czechlist mailing list
                      >> Czechlist@...
                      >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      >>
                      >
                      > _______________________________________________
                      > Czechlist mailing list
                      > Czechlist@...
                      > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


                      _______________________________________________
                      Czechlist mailing list
                      Czechlist@...
                      http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    • wustpisk
                      It s an Americanism so I thought you might like it.
                      Message 10 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                        It's an Americanism so I thought you might like it.

                        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > What is the duck test?
                        >
                        > Jamie
                        >
                        > On Aug 30, 2012, at 9:59 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                        >
                        > > I usually apply the duck test
                        > >
                        > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_test
                        > >
                        > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                        > >>
                        > >> Dear listmates,
                        > >>
                        > >> A member of our state translator association almost got caught up in one of the translator versions of the Nigerian scam recently, and she wrote me wanting to know how people can tell the original e-mail is fraudulent.
                        > >>
                        > >> I look at them with the eyes of an ESL instructor, so I have my ways of detecting them. One of the biggest giveaways is when the grammar and punctuation errors don't match the ethnicity of the name the e-mail is signed with. For example, the name on the bottom of the e-mail might be "Steven Jones", but the mistakes are ones that Arabs typically make, especially the punctuation.
                        > >>
                        > >> Plus, I get hundreds of e-mails a week from various project managers around the world -- Germans and French people writing in English, Chinese people writing in German, you name it -- and none of these legitimate project managers make the kinds of writing mistakes you find in those scam e-mails.
                        > >>
                        > >> Does anybody on the list have their own method of detecting these that I could pass on to this young woman?
                        > >>
                        > >> Jamie
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >> _______________________________________________
                        > >> Czechlist mailing list
                        > >> Czechlist@
                        > >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        > >>
                        > >
                        > > _______________________________________________
                        > > Czechlist mailing list
                        > > Czechlist@...
                        > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >
                        >
                        > _______________________________________________
                        > Czechlist mailing list
                        > Czechlist@...
                        > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        >
                      • wustpisk
                        Here s a picture of an alleged duck to help you http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/File:Mallard2.jpg
                        Message 11 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                          Here's a picture of an alleged duck to help you http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/File:Mallard2.jpg

                          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > What is the duck test?
                          >
                          > Jamie
                          >
                          > On Aug 30, 2012, at 9:59 AM, wustpisk wrote:
                          >
                          > > I usually apply the duck test
                          > >
                          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_test
                          > >
                          > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >> Dear listmates,
                          > >>
                          > >> A member of our state translator association almost got caught up in one of the translator versions of the Nigerian scam recently, and she wrote me wanting to know how people can tell the original e-mail is fraudulent.
                          > >>
                          > >> I look at them with the eyes of an ESL instructor, so I have my ways of detecting them. One of the biggest giveaways is when the grammar and punctuation errors don't match the ethnicity of the name the e-mail is signed with. For example, the name on the bottom of the e-mail might be "Steven Jones", but the mistakes are ones that Arabs typically make, especially the punctuation.
                          > >>
                          > >> Plus, I get hundreds of e-mails a week from various project managers around the world -- Germans and French people writing in English, Chinese people writing in German, you name it -- and none of these legitimate project managers make the kinds of writing mistakes you find in those scam e-mails.
                          > >>
                          > >> Does anybody on the list have their own method of detecting these that I could pass on to this young woman?
                          > >>
                          > >> Jamie
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> _______________________________________________
                          > >> Czechlist mailing list
                          > >> Czechlist@
                          > >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > > _______________________________________________
                          > > Czechlist mailing list
                          > > Czechlist@...
                          > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >
                          >
                          > _______________________________________________
                          > Czechlist mailing list
                          > Czechlist@...
                          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >
                        • James Kirchner
                          The translator version is where they offer you a job at a good rate and promise to pay you in advance. Then they send you a rubber check, ask you to deposit it
                          Message 12 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                            The translator version is where they offer you a job at a good rate and promise to pay you in advance.

                            Then they send you a rubber check, ask you to deposit it quickly, and before it's had time to clear, they tell you they've overpaid you and need you to return part of the money. The translator does this, then the original check bounces, and the translator is out the "remitted" money and the penalty fees.

                            These are not written in an overblown African style, but they have lots of punctuation and capitalization errors that are typical of Arabs when they write in English.

                            Jamie

                            On Aug 30, 2012, at 9:33 AM, czechlist-bounces@... wrote:

                            > Hi,
                            >
                            > I encountered just the big deal version (we need to deposit one million on
                            > your account). If English, the language tends to be orientally ling-winded.
                            > The natives like sort of text messaging style or they use a specific
                            > written-communication newspeak, specific "catchphrases" the non-English
                            > scammers don?t use - they are trying to be polite their own way.
                            >
                            >
                            > What is the translator version?
                            >
                            > Libor
                            >
                            > 2012/8/30 James Kirchner <czechlist@...>
                            >
                            >> **
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> Dear listmates,
                            >>
                            >> A member of our state translator association almost got caught up in one
                            >> of the translator versions of the Nigerian scam recently, and she wrote me
                            >> wanting to know how people can tell the original e-mail is fraudulent.
                            >>
                            >> I look at them with the eyes of an ESL instructor, so I have my ways of
                            >> detecting them. One of the biggest giveaways is when the grammar and
                            >> punctuation errors don't match the ethnicity of the name the e-mail is
                            >> signed with. For example, the name on the bottom of the e-mail might be
                            >> "Steven Jones", but the mistakes are ones that Arabs typically make,
                            >> especially the punctuation.
                            >>
                            >> Plus, I get hundreds of e-mails a week from various project managers
                            >> around the world -- Germans and French people writing in English, Chinese
                            >> people writing in German, you name it -- and none of these legitimate
                            >> project managers make the kinds of writing mistakes you find in those scam
                            >> e-mails.
                            >>
                            >> Does anybody on the list have their own method of detecting these that I
                            >> could pass on to this young woman?
                            >>
                            >> Jamie
                            >>
                            >> _______________________________________________
                            >> Czechlist mailing list
                            >> Czechlist@...
                            >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            >>
                            >>
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --
                            > czesko.pl, preloz.me, maven.cz
                            > Libor Zajicek <http://about.me>
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            > _______________________________________________
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                            > Czechlist@...
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                          • Melvyn
                            ... Yes, I mentioned it can sound urgent. ... Or at least a reason, if only the passage of time? Time I made a move. Time I hit the road. Time I was on my way.
                            Message 13 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I know it doesn't mean the person is offended, but when it's translated directly into English it often gives that impression. So can, "I'm outta here," if it's handled wrong.

                              Yes, I mentioned it can sound urgent.
                              >
                              > I'm starting to conclude that there's no way to translate it into English without adding an apology of some kind.

                              Or at least a reason, if only the passage of time?

                              Time I made a move.
                              Time I hit the road.
                              Time I was on my way.

                              In some situations I would be tempted to use something like this as a pragmatic translation.

                              How does something like "I'll be on my way then" or "I'll be off then" sound to American ears? To me they are considerably less immediate than "Okay, I'm on my way" or "I'm off", which really sound like you have your hat and coat on.

                              Goodness, will you look at the time now?

                              BR

                              M.
                            • wustpisk
                              I suppose this is the problem of having a language as rich as English, in all its forms. Right, best get going. Got to get the kids.
                              Message 14 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                                I suppose this is the problem of having a language as rich as English, in all its forms.

                                Right, best get going. Got to get the kids.

                                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > I know it doesn't mean the person is offended, but when it's translated directly into English it often gives that impression. So can, "I'm outta here," if it's handled wrong.
                                >
                                > Yes, I mentioned it can sound urgent.
                                > >
                                > > I'm starting to conclude that there's no way to translate it into English without adding an apology of some kind.
                                >
                                > Or at least a reason, if only the passage of time?
                                >
                                > Time I made a move.
                                > Time I hit the road.
                                > Time I was on my way.
                                >
                                > In some situations I would be tempted to use something like this as a pragmatic translation.
                                >
                                > How does something like "I'll be on my way then" or "I'll be off then" sound to American ears? To me they are considerably less immediate than "Okay, I'm on my way" or "I'm off", which really sound like you have your hat and coat on.
                                >
                                > Goodness, will you look at the time now?
                                >
                                > BR
                                >
                                > M.
                                >
                              • James Kirchner
                                I think it s the then that makes those phrases sound British. We don t use then to soften a phrase as much as you folks do. Jamie ...
                                Message 15 of 23 , Aug 30, 2012
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                                  I think it's the "then" that makes those phrases sound British. We don't use "then" to soften a phrase as much as you folks do.

                                  Jamie

                                  On Aug 30, 2012, at 12:09 PM, Melvyn wrote:

                                  > How does something like "I'll be on my way then" or "I'll be off then" sound to American ears? To me they are considerably less immediate than "Okay, I'm on my way" or "I'm off", which really sound like you have your hat and coat on.

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