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Re: [Czechlist] Re: Dostat banu - WITHOUT DIACRITICS :)

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  • Matej Klimes
    ...and this particular one (kruci fix) has been subtitled as Merde ... You can stick a Merde in at any time in French, can t you.. :) M ... something ...
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 20, 2012
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      ...and this particular one (kruci fix) has been subtitled as 'Merde ...'

      You can stick a Merde in at any time in French, can't you.. :)

      M

      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matej Klimes" <mklimes@...> wrote:
      >
      > They are all pretty mild, Gerry..
      >
      > Most of our 'dirty words' are... I would save the F word for
      something
      > much stronger .. as a general rule, I'd say unless the Czech
      expletive
      > is very sexual/strong, you're better off avoiding the F word, mind
      you
      > fuck this/fuck that, fuck off and the like are pretty common on Brit
      > telly and aren't taken as very strong these days, but kurnik sopa and
      > kruci nal/pisek etc. are very very mild, they are basically something
      > someone came up with to avoid using a real swear word, so things like
      > Gosh (if it wasn't so posh) for Oh God, or shush (sp?) for shit come
      to
      > mind..
      >
      > How do you know balik is a lunchbox/food, context I suppose, but we'd
      > normally call that svacina or something like that, balik on its own
      is
      > a package (delivered by post)
      >
      > M
      > ------ Original Message ------
      > From: "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@...>
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: 20.8.2012 15:14:13
      > Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Dostat banu - WITHOUT DIACRITICS :)
      > > How about this one then:
      > >
      > >Kruci fix! Kdo mne sezral balík?!
      > >
      > >For fuck's sake, who snaffled my grub?!
      > >
      > >or
      > >
      > >Hey man, some cat's eaten my food package, that's totally uncool ...
      > >
      > >??
      > >
      > >With things like Kruci fix! how far should one go, I wonder?
      > >
      > >There are also milder curses such as "kurnik sopa" (my 2 year-old's
      > >favourite saying) or 'doparoma', which I have put as "for goodness'
      > >sake" or similar.
      > >Opinions?
      > >--- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@> wrote:
      > >>
      > >> > To my mind "nerd" is an anachronism here. I'd rather use a 1960s
      > >expression like a "square". :-)
      > >> >
      > >>
      > >> I like it! The problem is that it is so tempting to put
      anachronisms
      > >in here - the dialogue is dotted with things like 'No to urcite',
      for
      > >which the obvious (and possibly anachronistic) translation would be
      > >'Yeah, right', especially as these are teenage girls talking.
      > >> As it is such a niche film, there are bound to be some (maybe
      > >exclusively) purists watching - the sort who will throw their shoe
      at
      > >the screen at the slightest hint of an error.
      > >>
      > >> The brief is as follows:
      > >>
      > >> 'Your translation is intended for an international audience, so
      even
      > >if it may sound flatter always pick the option that is clearer and
      > >that has no double meaning. Most of the audience doesn't speak any
      > >Czech, so dare to detach yourself from the source language in favour
      > >of clarity. When you watch a film you can't go back, if you don't
      get
      > >it it's gone. If you read grammar mistakes on the screen you just
      > >think it's a translator's mistake, not that the character is making
      > >grammar mistakes, so if we want to convey this peculiarity we must
      > >find alternative options. I hope you don't mind me giving you some
      > >tips. Film translation is so different and you have to almost upset
      > >all good translation rules!'
      > >>
      > >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@> wrote:
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >> >
      > >> > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matej Klimes" <mklimes@> wrote:
      > >> >
      > >> > > I like case or character, character sounds too ordinary to
      > >produce the
      > >> > > same effect, though.. rum xx sounds good too (after I checked
      > >what it
      > >> > > is, haven't come across rum in this sense..)
      > >> >
      > >> > Right, I thought we were after an unusual expression that needed
      > >some explanation, as you suggested:
      > >> >
      > >> > >maybe you could think of another word
      > >> > that sounds a bit foreign (to Eng ears) and means something
      > >> > non-descript and is slightly degrading - doesn't matter what
      > >exactly it
      > >> > means, the broader the meaning the better in this case, as long
      as
      > >it's
      > >> > used with slight contempt in certain contexts.
      > >> >
      > >> > Well, my next-door neighbour in Old Trafford used to describe
      her
      > >son as a "rum bugger". I asked my mum what she meant and my mum
      > >answered that our neighbour was very broad, as if that explained
      > >everything. So then I had to ask what my mum meant by "broad". And
      so
      > >it went on. :-) But I digress.
      > >> >
      > >> > To my mind "nerd" is an anachronism here. I'd rather use a 1960s
      > >expression like a "square". :-)
      > >> >
      > >> > BR
      > >> >
      > >> > M.
      > >> >
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

      >


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