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Re: [Czechlist] just curious - "rozkoukat se" in English

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  • czechlist@czechlist.org
    I d say find/work out the lie of the land. Fronek s finding your bearings is OK, too, although it suggests slightly more doubt - he still needs to find his
    Message 1 of 51 , Jul 3, 2012
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      I'd say "find/work out the lie of the land." Fronek's finding your
      bearings is OK, too, although it suggests slightly more doubt - "he still
      needs to find his bearings."

      To get your feet under the table is to get yourself reasonably well
      established somewhere. so a bit different.



      > Might not be limey - could have been an Ozzie wannabe
      > http://dictionary.babylon.com/suss_out/
      >
      >
      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> I still maintain that "suss out" is not understood by 99.9% of North
      >> Americans, regardless of what you can find me from my hometown. I've
      >> worked at the companies produce articles like that, and there's always
      >> some limey wannabe on staff.
      >>
      >> You could find the term "dodgy" in an American article here and there,
      >> but that doesn't mean we use it or even understand it. (Of course,
      >> understanding "dodgy" is a real problem, because it appears to mean
      >> almost anything.)
      >>
      >> Jamie
      >>
      >> On Jul 3, 2012, at 10:07 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
      >>
      >> > Ellis might turn out to be a blow-in from the other side of the pond
      >> :)
      >> >
      >> > Gerry
      >> >
      >> > On 3 July 2012 15:03, wustpisk <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
      >> >
      >> >> **
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >> http://blog.makezine.com/category/making_detroit/
      >> >> http://blog.thedetroithub.com/tag/riverwalk/
      >> >>
      >> >> Wait a minute - it may just have made the long walk (or swim, as the
      >> case
      >> >> may be ...) :)
      >> >>
      >> >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "wustpisk" <gerry.vickers@> wrote:
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Careful with that last one - it appears to be Canadian :)
      >> >>> It might not have passed over the border from Canada to Detroit, yet
      >> ...
      >> >>>
      >> >>> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie Stanford Translations"
      >> >> <charliestanfordtranslations@> wrote:
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> I think you are out of date with "suss out" Jamie - maybe it just
      >> >> hasn't made it to Detroit yet but nice to see that a British
      >> expression has
      >> >> made it across the Atlantic....
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> "Google Ngram indicates that the expression turned up in the U.S.
      >> >> circa 1990 and has been steadily increasing in popularity ever
      >> since."
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> Features in the American Heritage Dictionary of the English
      >> Language
      >> >> (4th ed.) and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.)
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> "I think I'm good at sussing out what's going on" (Ry Cooder - US
      >> >> guitarist).
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> Parade Magazine, Jan 22, 2012, Intelligence Report, article re 10
      >> Aps
      >> >> That Could Save Your Life. "5 Star Urgent Response: In an emergency,
      >> one
      >> >> tap on 5-Star connects you to a live operator who will zero in on
      >> your
      >> >> location, suss out the situation, and call for assistance..."
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> "Mr. Dallas: Top bartenders suss out pretenders with these drinks"
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >> http://www.dallasnews.com/entertainment/columnists/mr-dallas/20120314-mr.-dallas-top-bartenders-suss-out-pretenders-with-these-drinks.ece
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> "Suss out pop-up farmer's markets" - Canadian Gardening
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> and more......
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> ----- Original Message -----
      >> >>>> From: James Kirchner
      >> >>>> To: czechlist@
      >> >>>> Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2012 3:28 PM
      >> >>>> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] just curious - "rozkoukat se" in English
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> "Suss things out" would never be understood in North America.
      >> People
      >> >> would think it was a typo.
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> To get one's head around something usually means to understand some
      >> >> concept, so even in a physical situation, the concept or idea of what
      >> is
      >> >> going on would be important.
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> We have a lot of expressions for this, but they very much depend on
      >> >> the actual situation. We'd use a different term for getting used to
      >> the
      >> >> dark than we would for a social situation or figuring out the layout
      >> of a
      >> >> place. I don't think we have a general expression for this.
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> The expressions could range from "get used to the dark" to "get the
      >> >> lay of the land" (which is also used metaphorically). There are a
      >> thousand
      >> >> of them, but they're all context dependent.
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> Jamie
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> On Jul 3, 2012, at 8:28 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>> I'd say it depends on context (or at least is easier to come up
      >> with
      >> >> in
      >> >>>>> context), but OTTOMH:
      >> >>>>>
      >> >>>>> To suss things out.. (colloquial and BRE, but works quite well, I
      >> >> think)
      >> >>>>> To get one's head round something
      >> >>>>> To figure things out
      >> >>>>>
      >> >>>>> M
      >> >>>>>
      >> >>>>>
      >> >>>>> ------ Original Message ------
      >> >>>>> From: "Tomas Mosler" <tomas.mosler@>
      >> >>>>> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      >> >>>>> Sent: 3.7.2012 14:18:34
      >> >>>>> Subject: [Czechlist] just curious - "rozkoukat se" in English
      >> >>>>>> Hi folks,
      >> >>>>>>
      >> >>>>>> Could someone please tell me how does one say "rozkoukat se" in
      >> >>>>>> English? Not in terms of getting to see better in the dark, but
      >> to
      >> >>>>>> orient yourself in a new environment/situation.
      >> >>>>>>
      >> >>>>>> I don't need it for any professional work, only interested to
      >> know
      >> >> the
      >> >>>>>> best way... Is "get one's feet under the table" the most suitable
      >> >> way
      >> >>>>>> to express the idea?
      >> >>>>>>
      >> >>>>>> Thanks.
      >> >>>>>>
      >> >>>>>> Tomas
      >> >>>>>>
      >> >>>>>>
      >> >>>>>
      >> >>>>>
      >> >>>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >>>>>
      >> >>>>> _______________________________________________
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      >> >>>>
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      >> >>>> Czechlist mailing list
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      >> >>>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >>>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > --
      >> > 7 Old Shoreham Road
      >> > Brighton
      >> > Sussex
      >> > BN1 5DQ
      >> > U.K.
      >> >
      >> > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
      >> >
      >> > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
      >> > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
      >> > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
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      >> >
      >> >
      >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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    • James Kirchner
      In the US we can also say dates both ways, but the dominant usage is the one you think is backwards. We can also get A4 paper here, but no one uses it. I
      Message 51 of 51 , Oct 18, 2012
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        In the US we can also say dates both ways, but the dominant usage is the one you think is backwards.

        We can also get A4 paper here, but no one uses it. I think I have a ream of it here somewhere.

        JK

        On Oct 18, 2012, at 8:48 AM, wustpisk wrote:

        >> Czech dates are not backwards, because they really say the dates in that order "jedenacteho zari 2011".
        >
        > And neither are English dates because they really say it in that order as well. However the great thing is that we (in Britain) have the choice to say it the other way too, however by convention and so that the rest of the world can understand, we use the DDMMYYYY format. All EU documents are in that format, for example.
        >
        > Same with A4 paper.
        >
        > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> Czech dates are not backwards, because they really say the dates in that order "jedenacteho zari 2011".
        >>
        >> British dates are backwards (at least for us), because we don't say "eleven September 2011". We say "September eleventh 2011". So to track properly when we read them, they should be written as "September 11, 2011". "11 September 2011" always makes my eyes ping-pong, just like newspapers that say things like "to 25,000 from 19,000".
        >>
        >> There's obviously no reason why the US has to emulate Europe in things like this.
        >>
        >> The American word for "autumnal" is "autumnal". As I said, Americans use both "fall" and "autumn", just as did the British who first settled the continent. (This is a case of the British losing something, rather than us changing something.)
        >>
        >> Jamie
        >>
        >> On Oct 18, 2012, at 7:00 AM, wustpisk wrote:
        >>
        >>> I was rather confused about that as well - as this is a 'Czechlist', speaking from a Czech point of view, notwithstanding the 'britishness' of the debate, US dates are also the other way around from Czech dates. Therefore, by your logic, Czech dates are also the 'wrong way around'. Fine.
        >>> e.g. lets take a couple of historical dates
        >>> 11 September 2001 = 11. zari 2001 or 11.9.2001
        >>> 21 November 1969 = 21. listopadu 1969 or 21.11.1969
        >>> 28 October 1918 = 28. rijna 1918 or 28.10.1918
        >>>
        >>> I think all European countries use the same or very similar formulation. US appears to be out on a limb with this one (along with Belize), for whatever reason, and it DOES cause confusion also for US visitors to the old continent, as does the 24-hour clock. FYI in informal speech it is fine to say for example 'je deset hodin' when taking about 22:00, but you would never find that in any timetables or in most written material.
        >>>
        >>> Just as a matter of interest, how do you say 'autumnal' in American?
        >>
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