Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

rozkoukat se

Expand Messages
  • slalom249
    My mid-sized Oxford has this : (I wrote down the main parts) Suss (brit. Informal) 1. Realize, understand the true nature of 2. Police suspect 3. As adj.
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      My mid-sized Oxford has this :
      (I wrote down the main parts)

      Suss (brit. Informal)
      1. Realize, understand the true nature of
      2. Police suspect
      3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
      4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type

      Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion

      So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference

      Hanka Geiger
    • Gerald Turner
      Eric Partridge s Dictionary of Slang (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or 1966 for the origin of suss out . The (US-based) Online Etymology Dictionary -
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or 1966 for the
        origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology Dictionary" -
        http://www.etymonline.com - which I find very useful and handy - states: suss
        (v.) <http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0> "to
        figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect" (1953,
        police jargon), a slang shortening of
        suspect<http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
        (v.).

        Gerry
        On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > My mid-sized Oxford has this :
        > (I wrote down the main parts)
        >
        > Suss (brit. Informal)
        > 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
        > 2. Police suspect
        > 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
        > 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
        >
        > Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
        >
        > So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
        >
        > Hanka Geiger
        >
        >
        >



        --
        7 Old Shoreham Road
        Brighton
        Sussex
        BN1 5DQ
        U.K.

        Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484

        To see a World in a Grain of Sand
        And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
        Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
        And Eternity in an hour.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Kirchner
        It s not the suss out that makes the difference. As you can see, your Oxford designates the term as British slang. None of the four definitions given in
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          It's not the "suss out" that makes the difference. As you can see, your Oxford designates the term as British slang. None of the four definitions given in your dictionary are in common use in the US, and they would not be understood by anyone here unless they have been an exchange student in the UK or something like that.

          Jamie

          On Jul 3, 2012, at 10:53 AM, slalom249 wrote:

          > My mid-sized Oxford has this :
          > (I wrote down the main parts)
          >
          > Suss (brit. Informal)
          > 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
          > 2. Police suspect
          > 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
          > 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
          >
          > Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
          >
          > So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
          >
          > Hanka Geiger
          >
          >
          > _______________________________________________
          > Czechlist mailing list
          > Czechlist@...
          > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


          _______________________________________________
          Czechlist mailing list
          Czechlist@...
          http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        • Gerald Turner
          A bio of the echt americký compiler of the Online Etymology Dictionary http://www.etymonline.com/columns/bio.htm Gerry ... -- 7 Old Shoreham Road Brighton
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            A bio of the "echt americký" compiler of the "Online Etymology Dictionary"
            http://www.etymonline.com/columns/bio.htm

            Gerry

            On 3 July 2012 16:05, Gerald Turner <turner.gerald@...> wrote:

            > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or 1966 for
            > the origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology Dictionary" -
            > http://www.etymonline.com - which I find very useful and handy - states: suss
            > (v.) <http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0> "to
            > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect" (1953,
            > police jargon), a slang shortening of suspect<http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
            > (v.).
            >
            > Gerry
            >
            > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
            >
            >> **
            >>
            >>
            >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
            >> (I wrote down the main parts)
            >>
            >> Suss (brit. Informal)
            >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
            >> 2. Police suspect
            >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
            >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
            >>
            >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
            >>
            >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
            >>
            >> Hanka Geiger
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > 7 Old Shoreham Road
            > Brighton
            > Sussex
            > BN1 5DQ
            > U.K.
            >
            > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
            >
            > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
            > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
            > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
            > And Eternity in an hour.
            >



            --
            7 Old Shoreham Road
            Brighton
            Sussex
            BN1 5DQ
            U.K.

            Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484

            To see a World in a Grain of Sand
            And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
            Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
            And Eternity in an hour.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • James Kirchner
            Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression or the country where it is used. You re assuming that American etymological dictionaries cover
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression or the country where it is used. You're assuming that American etymological dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do not. He gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which designates it as "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain terms that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think users might encounter in foreign sources.

              Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that more than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have any idea what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google hits would make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it is definitely not.

              Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary alone is full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans have heard or understand.

              This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ and half the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan affairs" was not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no American would understand it.

              Jamie

              On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:

              > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or 1966 for the
              > origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology Dictionary" -
              > http://www.etymonline.com - which I find very useful and handy - states: suss
              > (v.) <http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0> "to
              > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect" (1953,
              > police jargon), a slang shortening of
              > suspect<http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
              > (v.).
              >
              > Gerry
              > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
              >
              >> **
              >>
              >>
              >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
              >> (I wrote down the main parts)
              >>
              >> Suss (brit. Informal)
              >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
              >> 2. Police suspect
              >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
              >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
              >>
              >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
              >>
              >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
              >>
              >> Hanka Geiger
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > 7 Old Shoreham Road
              > Brighton
              > Sussex
              > BN1 5DQ
              > U.K.
              >
              > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
              >
              > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
              > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
              > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
              > And Eternity in an hour.
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > _______________________________________________
              > Czechlist mailing list
              > Czechlist@...
              > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


              _______________________________________________
              Czechlist mailing list
              Czechlist@...
              http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
            • wustpisk
              No idea what boxwallah means, but it sounds good. I shall make a point of using it some time today. As previously suggested, you should try using suss out
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                No idea what 'boxwallah' means, but it sounds good. I shall make a point of using it some time today.

                As previously suggested, you should try using 'suss out' - you never know, it might just catch on :)

                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                >
                > Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression or the country where it is used. You're assuming that American etymological dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do not. He gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which designates it as "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain terms that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think users might encounter in foreign sources.
                >
                > Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that more than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have any idea what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google hits would make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it is definitely not.
                >
                > Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary alone is full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans have heard or understand.
                >
                > This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ and half the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan affairs" was not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no American would understand it.
                >
                > Jamie
                >
                > On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
                >
                > > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or 1966 for the
                > > origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology Dictionary" -
                > > http://www.etymonline.com - which I find very useful and handy - states: suss
                > > (v.) <http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0> "to
                > > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect" (1953,
                > > police jargon), a slang shortening of
                > > suspect<http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
                > > (v.).
                > >
                > > Gerry
                > > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
                > >
                > >> **
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
                > >> (I wrote down the main parts)
                > >>
                > >> Suss (brit. Informal)
                > >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
                > >> 2. Police suspect
                > >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
                > >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
                > >>
                > >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
                > >>
                > >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
                > >>
                > >> Hanka Geiger
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --
                > > 7 Old Shoreham Road
                > > Brighton
                > > Sussex
                > > BN1 5DQ
                > > U.K.
                > >
                > > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                > >
                > > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                > > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                > > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                > > And Eternity in an hour.
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > > _______________________________________________
                > > Czechlist mailing list
                > > Czechlist@...
                > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >
                >
                > _______________________________________________
                > Czechlist mailing list
                > Czechlist@...
                > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                >
              • James Kirchner
                A boxwallah is what one of my Bengali students refers to as a lunch carrier . He s a guy who s paid to pick up your lunch from your wife at home and bring it
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  A boxwallah is what one of my Bengali students refers to as a "lunch carrier". He's a guy who's paid to pick up your lunch from your wife at home and bring it to your office every day.

                  Jamie

                  On Jul 3, 2012, at 12:14 PM, wustpisk wrote:

                  > No idea what 'boxwallah' means, but it sounds good. I shall make a point of using it some time today.
                  >
                  > As previously suggested, you should try using 'suss out' - you never know, it might just catch on :)
                  >
                  > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression or the country where it is used. You're assuming that American etymological dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do not. He gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which designates it as "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain terms that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think users might encounter in foreign sources.
                  >>
                  >> Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that more than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have any idea what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google hits would make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it is definitely not.
                  >>
                  >> Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary alone is full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans have heard or understand.
                  >>
                  >> This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ and half the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan affairs" was not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no American would understand it.
                  >>
                  >> Jamie
                  >>
                  >> On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
                  >>
                  >>> Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or 1966 for the
                  >>> origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology Dictionary" -
                  >>> http://www.etymonline.com - which I find very useful and handy - states: suss
                  >>> (v.) <http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0> "to
                  >>> figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect" (1953,
                  >>> police jargon), a slang shortening of
                  >>> suspect<http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
                  >>> (v.).
                  >>>
                  >>> Gerry
                  >>> On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
                  >>>
                  >>>> **
                  >>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
                  >>>> (I wrote down the main parts)
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Suss (brit. Informal)
                  >>>> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
                  >>>> 2. Police suspect
                  >>>> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
                  >>>> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
                  >>>>
                  >>>> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Hanka Geiger
                  >>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> --
                  >>> 7 Old Shoreham Road
                  >>> Brighton
                  >>> Sussex
                  >>> BN1 5DQ
                  >>> U.K.
                  >>>
                  >>> Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                  >>>
                  >>> To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                  >>> And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                  >>> Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                  >>> And Eternity in an hour.
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >>>
                  >>> _______________________________________________
                  >>> Czechlist mailing list
                  >>> Czechlist@...
                  >>> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> _______________________________________________
                  >> Czechlist mailing list
                  >> Czechlist@...
                  >> http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  > _______________________________________________
                  > Czechlist mailing list
                  > Czechlist@...
                  > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist


                  _______________________________________________
                  Czechlist mailing list
                  Czechlist@...
                  http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                • Gerald Turner
                  At my London school bookwallah was the term used to describe the boy whose duty was to collect up textbooks. (Mind you, British India wasn t only 15 years
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    At my London school "bookwallah" was the term used to describe the boy
                    whose duty was to collect up textbooks. (Mind you, British India wasn't
                    only 15 years dead at the time).

                    Gerry

                    On 3 July 2012 17:14, wustpisk <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > No idea what 'boxwallah' means, but it sounds good. I shall make a point
                    > of using it some time today.
                    >
                    > As previously suggested, you should try using 'suss out' - you never know,
                    > it might just catch on :)
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression or the
                    > country where it is used. You're assuming that American etymological
                    > dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do not. He
                    > gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which designates it as
                    > "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain terms
                    > that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think users
                    > might encounter in foreign sources.
                    > >
                    > > Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster
                    > dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that more
                    > than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have any idea
                    > what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google hits would
                    > make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it is
                    > definitely not.
                    > >
                    > > Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any
                    > indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary alone is
                    > full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans have heard
                    > or understand.
                    > >
                    > > This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ and half
                    > the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I
                    > constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan affairs" was
                    > not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no American
                    > would understand it.
                    > >
                    > > Jamie
                    > >
                    > > On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or 1966
                    > for the
                    > > > origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology Dictionary" -
                    > > > http://www.etymonline.com - which I find very useful and handy -
                    > states: suss
                    > > > (v.) <http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0>
                    > "to
                    > > > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect"
                    > (1953,
                    > > > police jargon), a slang shortening of
                    > > > suspect<
                    > http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
                    > > > (v.).
                    > > >
                    > > > Gerry
                    > > > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > >> **
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
                    > > >> (I wrote down the main parts)
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Suss (brit. Informal)
                    > > >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
                    > > >> 2. Police suspect
                    > > >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
                    > > >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
                    > > >>
                    > > >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Hanka Geiger
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > --
                    > > > 7 Old Shoreham Road
                    > > > Brighton
                    > > > Sussex
                    > > > BN1 5DQ
                    > > > U.K.
                    > > >
                    > > > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                    > > >
                    > > > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                    > > > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                    > > > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                    > > > And Eternity in an hour.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > >
                    > > > _______________________________________________
                    > > > Czechlist mailing list
                    > > > Czechlist@...
                    >
                    > > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > _______________________________________________
                    > > Czechlist mailing list
                    > > Czechlist@...
                    > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >



                    --
                    7 Old Shoreham Road
                    Brighton
                    Sussex
                    BN1 5DQ
                    U.K.

                    Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484

                    To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                    And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                    And Eternity in an hour.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Matej Klimes
                    In an attempt to lighten things up a bit, the wallah bit in book/boxwallah, alth pronounced differently, must have Valassky puvod - valach/gelding being the
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      In an attempt to lighten things up a bit,

                      the wallah bit in book/boxwallah, alth pronounced differently, must
                      have Valassky puvod - valach/gelding being the traditional beast of
                      burden, there must have been a Walachian explorer in India at some time
                      who plied everybody with slivovica and then made people carry his
                      frgale for him..

                      M
                      ------ Original Message ------
                      From: "Gerald Turner" <turner.gerald@...>
                      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: 3.7.2012 18:21:03
                      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: rozkoukat se
                      > At my London school "bookwallah" was the term used to describe the boy
                      >whose duty was to collect up textbooks. (Mind you, British India wasn't
                      >only 15 years dead at the time).
                      >
                      >Gerry
                      >
                      >On 3 July 2012 17:14, wustpisk <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >> **
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> No idea what 'boxwallah' means, but it sounds good. I shall make a
                      >point
                      >> of using it some time today.
                      >>
                      >> As previously suggested, you should try using 'suss out' - you never
                      >know,
                      >> it might just catch on :)
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                      >> >
                      >> > Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression or
                      >the
                      >> country where it is used. You're assuming that American etymological
                      >> dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do not.
                      >He
                      >> gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which
                      >designates it as
                      >> "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain
                      >terms
                      >> that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think
                      >users
                      >> might encounter in foreign sources.
                      >> >
                      >> > Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster
                      >> dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that
                      >more
                      >> than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have
                      >any idea
                      >> what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google
                      >hits would
                      >> make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it is
                      >> definitely not.
                      >> >
                      >> > Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any
                      >> indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary alone
                      >is
                      >> full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans have
                      >heard
                      >> or understand.
                      >> >
                      >> > This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ
                      >and half
                      >> the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I
                      >> constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan
                      >affairs" was
                      >> not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no
                      >American
                      >> would understand it.
                      >> >
                      >> > Jamie
                      >> >
                      >> > On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
                      >> >
                      >> > > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or
                      >1966
                      >> for the
                      >> > > origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology
                      >Dictionary" -
                      >> > > http://www.etymonline.com/ - which I find very useful and handy -
                      >> states: suss
                      >> > > (v.) <http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0>
                      >> "to
                      >> > > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect"
                      >> (1953,
                      >> > > police jargon), a slang shortening of
                      >> > > suspect<
                      >> http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
                      >> > > (v.).
                      >> > >
                      >> > > Gerry
                      >> > > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
                      >> > >
                      >> > >> **
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
                      >> > >> (I wrote down the main parts)
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >> Suss (brit. Informal)
                      >> > >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
                      >> > >> 2. Police suspect
                      >> > >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
                      >> > >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >> Hanka Geiger
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >>
                      >> > >
                      >> > >
                      >> > >
                      >> > > --
                      >> > > 7 Old Shoreham Road
                      >> > > Brighton
                      >> > > Sussex
                      >> > > BN1 5DQ
                      >> > > U.K.
                      >> > >
                      >> > > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                      >> > >
                      >> > > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                      >> > > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                      >> > > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                      >> > > And Eternity in an hour.
                      >> > >
                      >> > >
                      >> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >> > >
                      >> > > _______________________________________________
                      >> > > Czechlist mailing list
                      >> > > Czechlist@...
                      >>
                      >> > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      >> >
                      >> >
                      >> > _______________________________________________
                      >> > Czechlist mailing list
                      >> > Czechlist@...
                      >> > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                      >> >
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >
                      >--
                      >7 Old Shoreham Road
                      >Brighton
                      >Sussex
                      >BN1 5DQ
                      >U.K.
                      >
                      >Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                      >
                      >To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                      >And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                      >Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                      >And Eternity in an hour.
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Gerald Turner
                      Fraid not. As I indicated, it came into English at the time off British imperial rule in India, which was known as the Raj from the Hindi word for reign ,
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
                      • 0 Attachment
                        'Fraid not. As I indicated, it came into English at the time off British
                        imperial rule in India, which was known as "the Raj" from the Hindi word
                        for "reign", rather than the Walachian word for "paradise" (which it
                        probably wasn't for most of the population). Walla or wallah is likewise
                        derived from Hindi, namely the Hindi/Urdu suffix -wala indicating a person
                        engaged in a particular activity. British soldiers took it mean simply "a
                        man" - various usages here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallah

                        Gerry
                        On 3 July 2012 17:34, Matej Klimes <mklimes@...> wrote:

                        > **
                        >
                        >
                        > In an attempt to lighten things up a bit,
                        >
                        > the wallah bit in book/boxwallah, alth pronounced differently, must
                        > have Valassky puvod - valach/gelding being the traditional beast of
                        > burden, there must have been a Walachian explorer in India at some time
                        > who plied everybody with slivovica and then made people carry his
                        > frgale for him..
                        >
                        > M
                        > ------ Original Message ------
                        > From: "Gerald Turner" <turner.gerald@...>
                        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: 3.7.2012 18:21:03
                        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: rozkoukat se
                        > > At my London school "bookwallah" was the term used to describe the boy
                        > >whose duty was to collect up textbooks. (Mind you, British India wasn't
                        > >only 15 years dead at the time).
                        > >
                        > >Gerry
                        > >
                        > >On 3 July 2012 17:14, wustpisk <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >> **
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >> No idea what 'boxwallah' means, but it sounds good. I shall make a
                        > >point
                        > >> of using it some time today.
                        > >>
                        > >> As previously suggested, you should try using 'suss out' - you never
                        > >know,
                        > >> it might just catch on :)
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression or
                        > >the
                        > >> country where it is used. You're assuming that American etymological
                        > >> dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do not.
                        > >He
                        > >> gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which
                        > >designates it as
                        > >> "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain
                        > >terms
                        > >> that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think
                        > >users
                        > >> might encounter in foreign sources.
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster
                        > >> dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that
                        > >more
                        > >> than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have
                        > >any idea
                        > >> what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google
                        > >hits would
                        > >> make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it is
                        > >> definitely not.
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any
                        > >> indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary alone
                        > >is
                        > >> full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans have
                        > >heard
                        > >> or understand.
                        > >> >
                        > >> > This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ
                        > >and half
                        > >> the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I
                        > >> constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan
                        > >affairs" was
                        > >> not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no
                        > >American
                        > >> would understand it.
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Jamie
                        > >> >
                        > >> > On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
                        > >> >
                        > >> > > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or
                        > >1966
                        > >> for the
                        > >> > > origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology
                        > >Dictionary" -
                        > >> > > http://www.etymonline.com/ - which I find very useful and handy -
                        > >> states: suss
                        > >> > > (v.) <
                        > http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0>
                        > >> "to
                        > >> > > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect"
                        > >> (1953,
                        > >> > > police jargon), a slang shortening of
                        > >> > > suspect<
                        > >> http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
                        > >> > > (v.).
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > > Gerry
                        > >> > > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > >> **
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
                        > >> > >> (I wrote down the main parts)
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >> Suss (brit. Informal)
                        > >> > >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
                        > >> > >> 2. Police suspect
                        > >> > >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
                        > >> > >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >> Hanka Geiger
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >>
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > > --
                        > >> > > 7 Old Shoreham Road
                        > >> > > Brighton
                        > >> > > Sussex
                        > >> > > BN1 5DQ
                        > >> > > U.K.
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                        > >> > > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                        > >> > > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                        > >> > > And Eternity in an hour.
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >> > >
                        > >> > > _______________________________________________
                        > >> > > Czechlist mailing list
                        > >> > > Czechlist@...
                        > >>
                        > >> > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> > _______________________________________________
                        > >> > Czechlist mailing list
                        > >> > Czechlist@...
                        > >> > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                        > >> >
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >
                        > >--
                        > >7 Old Shoreham Road
                        > >Brighton
                        > >Sussex
                        > >BN1 5DQ
                        > >U.K.
                        > >
                        > >Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                        > >
                        > >To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                        > >And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                        > >Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                        > >And Eternity in an hour.
                        > >
                        > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >



                        --
                        7 Old Shoreham Road
                        Brighton
                        Sussex
                        BN1 5DQ
                        U.K.

                        Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484

                        To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                        And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                        Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                        And Eternity in an hour.


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Matej Klimes
                        I was just joking and hoping it would provide distraction.. you didn t think I was being serious? M ... From: Gerald Turner To:
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I was just joking and hoping it would provide distraction.. you didn't
                          think I was being serious?

                          M
                          ------ Original Message ------
                          From: "Gerald Turner" <turner.gerald@...>
                          To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: 3.7.2012 19:17:36
                          Subject: Re: Re[2]: [Czechlist] Re: rozkoukat se
                          > 'Fraid not. As I indicated, it came into English at the time off
                          >British
                          >imperial rule in India, which was known as "the Raj" from the Hindi
                          >word
                          >for "reign", rather than the Walachian word for "paradise" (which it
                          >probably wasn't for most of the population). Walla or wallah is
                          >likewise
                          >derived from Hindi, namely the Hindi/Urdu suffix -wala indicating a
                          >person
                          >engaged in a particular activity. British soldiers took it mean simply
                          >"a
                          >man" - various usages here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallah
                          >
                          >Gerry
                          >On 3 July 2012 17:34, Matej Klimes <mklimes@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >> **
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> In an attempt to lighten things up a bit,
                          >>
                          >> the wallah bit in book/boxwallah, alth pronounced differently, must
                          >> have Valassky puvod - valach/gelding being the traditional beast of
                          >> burden, there must have been a Walachian explorer in India at some
                          >time
                          >> who plied everybody with slivovica and then made people carry his
                          >> frgale for him..
                          >>
                          >> M
                          >> ------ Original Message ------
                          >> From: "Gerald Turner" <turner.gerald@...>
                          >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                          >> Sent: 3.7.2012 18:21:03
                          >> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: rozkoukat se
                          >> > At my London school "bookwallah" was the term used to describe the
                          >boy
                          >> >whose duty was to collect up textbooks. (Mind you, British India
                          >wasn't
                          >> >only 15 years dead at the time).
                          >> >
                          >> >Gerry
                          >> >
                          >> >On 3 July 2012 17:14, wustpisk <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
                          >> >
                          >> >> **
                          >> >>
                          >> >>
                          >> >> No idea what 'boxwallah' means, but it sounds good. I shall make a
                          >> >point
                          >> >> of using it some time today.
                          >> >>
                          >> >> As previously suggested, you should try using 'suss out' - you
                          >never
                          >> >know,
                          >> >> it might just catch on :)
                          >> >>
                          >> >>
                          >> >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> > Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression
                          >or
                          >> >the
                          >> >> country where it is used. You're assuming that American
                          >etymological
                          >> >> dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do
                          >not.
                          >> >He
                          >> >> gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which
                          >> >designates it as
                          >> >> "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain
                          >> >terms
                          >> >> that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think
                          >> >users
                          >> >> might encounter in foreign sources.
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> > Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster
                          >> >> dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that
                          >> >more
                          >> >> than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have
                          >> >any idea
                          >> >> what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google
                          >> >hits would
                          >> >> make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it
                          >is
                          >> >> definitely not.
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> > Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any
                          >> >> indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary
                          >alone
                          >> >is
                          >> >> full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans
                          >have
                          >> >heard
                          >> >> or understand.
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> > This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ
                          >> >and half
                          >> >> the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I
                          >> >> constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan
                          >> >affairs" was
                          >> >> not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no
                          >> >American
                          >> >> would understand it.
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> > Jamie
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> > On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> > > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or
                          >> >1966
                          >> >> for the
                          >> >> > > origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology
                          >> >Dictionary" -
                          >> >> > > http://www.etymonline.com/ - which I find very useful and handy -
                          >> >> states: suss
                          >> >> > > (v.) <
                          >> http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0>
                          >> >> "to
                          >> >> > > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to
                          >suspect"
                          >> >> (1953,
                          >> >> > > police jargon), a slang shortening of
                          >> >> > > suspect<
                          >> >> http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
                          >> >> > > (v.).
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > > Gerry
                          >> >> > > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > >> **
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
                          >> >> > >> (I wrote down the main parts)
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >> Suss (brit. Informal)
                          >> >> > >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
                          >> >> > >> 2. Police suspect
                          >> >> > >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
                          >> >> > >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >> Hanka Geiger
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >>
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > > --
                          >> >> > > 7 Old Shoreham Road
                          >> >> > > Brighton
                          >> >> > > Sussex
                          >> >> > > BN1 5DQ
                          >> >> > > U.K.
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                          >> >> > > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                          >> >> > > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                          >> >> > > And Eternity in an hour.
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >> >> > >
                          >> >> > > _______________________________________________
                          >> >> > > Czechlist mailing list
                          >> >> > > Czechlist@...
                          >> >>
                          >> >> > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> >
                          >> >> > _______________________________________________
                          >> >> > Czechlist mailing list
                          >> >> > Czechlist@...
                          >> >> > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                          >> >> >
                          >> >>
                          >> >>
                          >> >>
                          >> >
                          >> >--
                          >> >7 Old Shoreham Road
                          >> >Brighton
                          >> >Sussex
                          >> >BN1 5DQ
                          >> >U.K.
                          >> >
                          >> >Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                          >> >
                          >> >To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                          >> >And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                          >> >Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                          >> >And Eternity in an hour.
                          >> >
                          >> >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >>
                          >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >>
                          >>
                          >>
                          >
                          >--
                          >7 Old Shoreham Road
                          >Brighton
                          >Sussex
                          >BN1 5DQ
                          >U.K.
                          >
                          >Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                          >
                          >To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                          >And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                          >Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                          >And Eternity in an hour.
                          >
                          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Gerald Turner
                          No, but just in case ;) G ... -- 7 Old Shoreham Road Brighton Sussex BN1 5DQ U.K. Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484 To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jul 3, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            No, but just in case ;)

                            G

                            On 3 July 2012 20:02, Matej Klimes <mklimes@...> wrote:

                            > **
                            >
                            >
                            > I was just joking and hoping it would provide distraction.. you didn't
                            > think I was being serious?
                            >
                            >
                            > M
                            > ------ Original Message ------
                            > From: "Gerald Turner" <turner.gerald@...>
                            > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: 3.7.2012 19:17:36
                            > Subject: Re: Re[2]: [Czechlist] Re: rozkoukat se
                            > > 'Fraid not. As I indicated, it came into English at the time off
                            > >British
                            > >imperial rule in India, which was known as "the Raj" from the Hindi
                            > >word
                            > >for "reign", rather than the Walachian word for "paradise" (which it
                            > >probably wasn't for most of the population). Walla or wallah is
                            > >likewise
                            > >derived from Hindi, namely the Hindi/Urdu suffix -wala indicating a
                            > >person
                            > >engaged in a particular activity. British soldiers took it mean simply
                            > >"a
                            > >man" - various usages here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallah
                            > >
                            > >Gerry
                            > >On 3 July 2012 17:34, Matej Klimes <mklimes@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > >> **
                            >
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> In an attempt to lighten things up a bit,
                            > >>
                            > >> the wallah bit in book/boxwallah, alth pronounced differently, must
                            > >> have Valassky puvod - valach/gelding being the traditional beast of
                            > >> burden, there must have been a Walachian explorer in India at some
                            > >time
                            > >> who plied everybody with slivovica and then made people carry his
                            > >> frgale for him..
                            > >>
                            > >> M
                            > >> ------ Original Message ------
                            > >> From: "Gerald Turner" <turner.gerald@...>
                            > >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                            > >> Sent: 3.7.2012 18:21:03
                            > >> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: rozkoukat se
                            > >> > At my London school "bookwallah" was the term used to describe the
                            > >boy
                            > >> >whose duty was to collect up textbooks. (Mind you, British India
                            > >wasn't
                            > >> >only 15 years dead at the time).
                            > >> >
                            > >> >Gerry
                            > >> >
                            > >> >On 3 July 2012 17:14, wustpisk <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
                            > >> >
                            > >> >> **
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >> No idea what 'boxwallah' means, but it sounds good. I shall make a
                            > >> >point
                            > >> >> of using it some time today.
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >> As previously suggested, you should try using 'suss out' - you
                            > >never
                            > >> >know,
                            > >> >> it might just catch on :)
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...>
                            > wrote:
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> > Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression
                            > >or
                            > >> >the
                            > >> >> country where it is used. You're assuming that American
                            > >etymological
                            > >> >> dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do
                            > >not.
                            > >> >He
                            > >> >> gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which
                            > >> >designates it as
                            > >> >> "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain
                            > >> >terms
                            > >> >> that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think
                            > >> >users
                            > >> >> might encounter in foreign sources.
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> > Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster
                            > >> >> dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that
                            > >> >more
                            > >> >> than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have
                            > >> >any idea
                            > >> >> what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google
                            > >> >hits would
                            > >> >> make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it
                            > >is
                            > >> >> definitely not.
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> > Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any
                            > >> >> indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary
                            > >alone
                            > >> >is
                            > >> >> full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans
                            > >have
                            > >> >heard
                            > >> >> or understand.
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> > This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ
                            > >> >and half
                            > >> >> the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I
                            > >> >> constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan
                            > >> >affairs" was
                            > >> >> not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no
                            > >> >American
                            > >> >> would understand it.
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> > Jamie
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> > On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> > > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or
                            > >> >1966
                            > >> >> for the
                            > >> >> > > origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology
                            > >> >Dictionary" -
                            > >> >> > > http://www.etymonline.com/ - which I find very useful and handy
                            > -
                            > >> >> states: suss
                            > >> >> > > (v.) <
                            > >> http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0>
                            > >> >> "to
                            > >> >> > > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to
                            > >suspect"
                            > >> >> (1953,
                            > >> >> > > police jargon), a slang shortening of
                            > >> >> > > suspect<
                            > >> >> http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
                            > >> >> > > (v.).
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > > Gerry
                            > >> >> > > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@...> wrote:
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > >> **
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
                            > >> >> > >> (I wrote down the main parts)
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >> Suss (brit. Informal)
                            > >> >> > >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
                            > >> >> > >> 2. Police suspect
                            > >> >> > >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
                            > >> >> > >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >> Hanka Geiger
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >>
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > > --
                            > >> >> > > 7 Old Shoreham Road
                            > >> >> > > Brighton
                            > >> >> > > Sussex
                            > >> >> > > BN1 5DQ
                            > >> >> > > U.K.
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                            > >> >> > > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                            > >> >> > > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                            > >> >> > > And Eternity in an hour.
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >> >> > >
                            > >> >> > > _______________________________________________
                            > >> >> > > Czechlist mailing list
                            > >> >> > > Czechlist@...
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >> > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >> > _______________________________________________
                            > >> >> > Czechlist mailing list
                            > >> >> > Czechlist@...
                            > >> >> > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                            > >> >> >
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >>
                            > >> >
                            > >> >--
                            > >> >7 Old Shoreham Road
                            > >> >Brighton
                            > >> >Sussex
                            > >> >BN1 5DQ
                            > >> >U.K.
                            > >> >
                            > >> >Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                            > >> >
                            > >> >To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                            > >> >And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                            > >> >Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                            > >> >And Eternity in an hour.
                            > >> >
                            > >> >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >> >
                            > >> >
                            > >>
                            > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >
                            > >--
                            > >7 Old Shoreham Road
                            > >Brighton
                            > >Sussex
                            > >BN1 5DQ
                            > >U.K.
                            > >
                            > >Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                            > >
                            > >To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                            > >And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                            > >Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                            > >And Eternity in an hour.
                            > >
                            > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            >



                            --
                            7 Old Shoreham Road
                            Brighton
                            Sussex
                            BN1 5DQ
                            U.K.

                            Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484

                            To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                            And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                            Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                            And Eternity in an hour.


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • wustpisk
                            Flora: While having tiffin on the veranda of my bungalow I spilled kedgeree on my dungarees and had to go to the gymkhana in my pyjamas looking like a
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jul 12, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Flora: "While having tiffin on the veranda of my bungalow I spilled kedgeree on my dungarees and had to go to the gymkhana in my pyjamas looking like a coolie."

                              Nirad: "I was buying chutney in the bazaar when a thug who had escaped from the chokey ran amok and killed a box-wallah for his loot, creating a hullabaloo and landing himself in the mulligatawny."

                              Tom Stoppard, Indian Ink

                              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Turner <turner.gerald@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > No, but just in case ;)
                              >
                              > G
                              >
                              > On 3 July 2012 20:02, Matej Klimes <mklimes@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > **
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > I was just joking and hoping it would provide distraction.. you didn't
                              > > think I was being serious?
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > M
                              > > ------ Original Message ------
                              > > From: "Gerald Turner" <turner.gerald@...>
                              > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                              > > Sent: 3.7.2012 19:17:36
                              > > Subject: Re: Re[2]: [Czechlist] Re: rozkoukat se
                              > > > 'Fraid not. As I indicated, it came into English at the time off
                              > > >British
                              > > >imperial rule in India, which was known as "the Raj" from the Hindi
                              > > >word
                              > > >for "reign", rather than the Walachian word for "paradise" (which it
                              > > >probably wasn't for most of the population). Walla or wallah is
                              > > >likewise
                              > > >derived from Hindi, namely the Hindi/Urdu suffix -wala indicating a
                              > > >person
                              > > >engaged in a particular activity. British soldiers took it mean simply
                              > > >"a
                              > > >man" - various usages here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallah
                              > > >
                              > > >Gerry
                              > > >On 3 July 2012 17:34, Matej Klimes <mklimes@...> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > >> **
                              > >
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >> In an attempt to lighten things up a bit,
                              > > >>
                              > > >> the wallah bit in book/boxwallah, alth pronounced differently, must
                              > > >> have Valassky puvod - valach/gelding being the traditional beast of
                              > > >> burden, there must have been a Walachian explorer in India at some
                              > > >time
                              > > >> who plied everybody with slivovica and then made people carry his
                              > > >> frgale for him..
                              > > >>
                              > > >> M
                              > > >> ------ Original Message ------
                              > > >> From: "Gerald Turner" <turner.gerald@...>
                              > > >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                              > > >> Sent: 3.7.2012 18:21:03
                              > > >> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: rozkoukat se
                              > > >> > At my London school "bookwallah" was the term used to describe the
                              > > >boy
                              > > >> >whose duty was to collect up textbooks. (Mind you, British India
                              > > >wasn't
                              > > >> >only 15 years dead at the time).
                              > > >> >
                              > > >> >Gerry
                              > > >> >
                              > > >> >On 3 July 2012 17:14, wustpisk <gerry.vickers@...> wrote:
                              > > >> >
                              > > >> >> **
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >> No idea what 'boxwallah' means, but it sounds good. I shall make a
                              > > >> >point
                              > > >> >> of using it some time today.
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >> As previously suggested, you should try using 'suss out' - you
                              > > >never
                              > > >> >know,
                              > > >> >> it might just catch on :)
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >> --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@>
                              > > wrote:
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> > Partridge does not give the national origin of this expression
                              > > >or
                              > > >> >the
                              > > >> >> country where it is used. You're assuming that American
                              > > >etymological
                              > > >> >> dictionaries cover only American usage, which they certainly do
                              > > >not.
                              > > >> >He
                              > > >> >> gives the same dates as the Random House dictionary, which
                              > > >> >designates it as
                              > > >> >> "chiefly British slang". American dictionaries frequently contain
                              > > >> >terms
                              > > >> >> that are not in common American usage but that the compilers think
                              > > >> >users
                              > > >> >> might encounter in foreign sources.
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> > Just for fun, I've looked up "boxwallah" in my Merriam-Webster
                              > > >> >> dictionary, and sure enough it's there. Now try convincing me that
                              > > >> >more
                              > > >> >> than 1% of Americans have ever heard the word "boxwallah" or have
                              > > >> >any idea
                              > > >> >> what it means. And based on your method, the number of US Google
                              > > >> >hits would
                              > > >> >> make it appear to be quite an ordinary word in America, which it
                              > > >is
                              > > >> >> definitely not.
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> > Finding online sources containing a term is not necessarily any
                              > > >> >> indication it is in common use in the US. The urban dictionary
                              > > >alone
                              > > >> >is
                              > > >> >> full of terms that probably no more than four living Americans
                              > > >have
                              > > >> >heard
                              > > >> >> or understand.
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> > This whole exercise reminds me of when I was still living in CZ
                              > > >> >and half
                              > > >> >> the country had that book "Wang Dang American Slang". This meant I
                              > > >> >> constantly had to explain to Czechs that "discussing Ugandan
                              > > >> >affairs" was
                              > > >> >> not a common term for sexual intercourse and that virtually no
                              > > >> >American
                              > > >> >> would understand it.
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> > Jamie
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> > On Jul 3, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> > > Eric Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang" (8th Ed.) gives 1965 or
                              > > >> >1966
                              > > >> >> for the
                              > > >> >> > > origin of "suss out". The (US-based) "Online Etymology
                              > > >> >Dictionary" -
                              > > >> >> > > http://www.etymonline.com/ - which I find very useful and handy
                              > > -
                              > > >> >> states: suss
                              > > >> >> > > (v.) <
                              > > >> http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suss&allowed_in_frame=0>
                              > > >> >> "to
                              > > >> >> > > figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to
                              > > >suspect"
                              > > >> >> (1953,
                              > > >> >> > > police jargon), a slang shortening of
                              > > >> >> > > suspect<
                              > > >> >> http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=suspect&allowed_in_frame=0>
                              > > >> >> > > (v.).
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > > Gerry
                              > > >> >> > > On 3 July 2012 15:53, slalom249 <hgeige@> wrote:
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > >> **
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >> My mid-sized Oxford has this :
                              > > >> >> > >> (I wrote down the main parts)
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >> Suss (brit. Informal)
                              > > >> >> > >> 1. Realize, understand the true nature of
                              > > >> >> > >> 2. Police suspect
                              > > >> >> > >> 3. As adj. sussed clever and well informed
                              > > >> >> > >> 4. Knowledge or awareness of certain type
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >> Origin 1930 suspect, suspicion
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >> So I guess it is the suss-out that makes the difference
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >> Hanka Geiger
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >>
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > > --
                              > > >> >> > > 7 Old Shoreham Road
                              > > >> >> > > Brighton
                              > > >> >> > > Sussex
                              > > >> >> > > BN1 5DQ
                              > > >> >> > > U.K.
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                              > > >> >> > > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                              > > >> >> > > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                              > > >> >> > > And Eternity in an hour.
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > > >> >> > >
                              > > >> >> > > _______________________________________________
                              > > >> >> > > Czechlist mailing list
                              > > >> >> > > Czechlist@
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >> > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >> > _______________________________________________
                              > > >> >> > Czechlist mailing list
                              > > >> >> > Czechlist@
                              > > >> >> > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
                              > > >> >> >
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >>
                              > > >> >
                              > > >> >--
                              > > >> >7 Old Shoreham Road
                              > > >> >Brighton
                              > > >> >Sussex
                              > > >> >BN1 5DQ
                              > > >> >U.K.
                              > > >> >
                              > > >> >Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                              > > >> >
                              > > >> >To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                              > > >> >And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                              > > >> >Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                              > > >> >And Eternity in an hour.
                              > > >> >
                              > > >> >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > > >> >
                              > > >> >
                              > > >>
                              > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >
                              > > >--
                              > > >7 Old Shoreham Road
                              > > >Brighton
                              > > >Sussex
                              > > >BN1 5DQ
                              > > >U.K.
                              > > >
                              > > >Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                              > > >
                              > > >To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                              > > >And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                              > > >Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                              > > >And Eternity in an hour.
                              > > >
                              > > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --
                              > 7 Old Shoreham Road
                              > Brighton
                              > Sussex
                              > BN1 5DQ
                              > U.K.
                              >
                              > Tel/fax: ++ 44 1273208484
                              >
                              > To see a World in a Grain of Sand
                              > And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
                              > Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
                              > And Eternity in an hour.
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.