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Re: the + name of disease/presposition

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  • Melvyn
    I find the whole business of phrasal verbs rather interesting, so forgive me for going on (in the pejorative sense) a bit. It is true that traditionally
    Message 1 of 26 , Dec 13, 2011
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      I find the whole business of phrasal verbs rather interesting, so forgive me for going on (in the pejorative sense) a bit. It is true that traditionally phrasal verbs in general have been considered rather informal, but it was impressed on me in TEFL training classes and elsewhere* that nowadays they are often stylistically neutral (in the sense of "language that does not call attention to itself") and thus can be found aplenty in standard "broadsheet" newspaper articles. Indeed thousands of examples of this phrasal verb can be found in stylistically neutral contexts in the Telegraph and Guardian. Here is one random example:

      Last October, just a month after arriving in Delhi, Lucie Flach-Siebenlist came down with dengue fever
      http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2011/jul/24/mature-au-pairs

      where I ask myself what the alternatives actually are. "Contracted" is pretty clinical and formal, whereas "caught" strikes me as being rather blunt and unrefined in comparison to "come down with", which seems to me to be the Goldilocks expression here and in other standard journalistic texts.

      BTW a bit further on in the article we find she "came across" an agency. This is a phrasal verb that I teach students early on. Totally standard and stylistically neutral here IMHO. Others may disagree.

      In any case, a quick search of "with measles" and "with the measles" suggests to me we have some way to go worldwide before we eradicate the "the". :-)

      BR

      M.
      *
      is.muni.cz/th/104745/ff_m/diplomova_prace.doc
      "It is often claimed that phrasal verbs are used in informal register. Fletcher states that phrasal verbs are encountered even in quite formal texts and are the most natural-sounding choice."
      According to Fletcher (2005: LS14), "there is a large number of phrasal verbs that native speakers use in all registers, including formal and technical".
      Fletcher, Bryan (2005). `Register and Phrasal Verbs'.In: Rundell, Michael (ed.) (2005) Macmillan Phrasal Verbs Plus. Oxford : Macmillan Education, LS13-LS15.

      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Talacko <valerie@...> wrote:
      >
      > But you're more likely to find "the" in conjuction with "come down with"
      > because "come down with" is itself an informal turn of phrase.
    • James Kirchner
      What do you folks do with jednatel in a contract? None of the dictionary definitions that I find seem to make much sense. I usually think of something to
      Message 2 of 26 , Dec 13, 2011
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        What do you folks do with "jednatel" in a contract?

        None of the dictionary definitions that I find seem to make much sense. I usually think of something to use, but I'd like to hear how other people translate it.

        Jamie


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      • Jenny Gordon
        Good question, Jamie! I choose from a variety of words depending on my mood, the information I have (e.g. LinkedIn profile, company website, the agency s
        Message 3 of 26 , Dec 13, 2011
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          Good question, Jamie! I choose from a variety of words depending on my mood, the information I have (e.g. LinkedIn profile, company website, the agency's preferences, etc.). I wish I could just stick with one but I'm not sure it's ever going to happen!

          Jenny


          On 13 Dec 2011, at 12:20, James Kirchner wrote:

          > What do you folks do with "jednatel" in a contract?
          >
          > None of the dictionary definitions that I find seem to make much sense. I usually think of something to use, but I'd like to hear how other people translate it.
          >
          > Jamie
          >
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          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Melvyn
          ... http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist/message/46797 http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist/message/46826 BR M.
          Message 4 of 26 , Dec 13, 2011
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            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <czechlist@...> wrote:
            >
            > What do you folks do with "jednatel" in a contract?

            :-) Perhaps you were off on holiday in summer when we were last discussing this subject:

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist/message/46797

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist/message/46826

            BR

            M.
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