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Re: [Czechlist] "garage" meaning

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  • Charlie Stanford Translations
    Maybe Valerie and Jamie are right but to me a London garage immediately makes me think of an opravna more than a garaz - I suppose it depends on the type of
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 7, 2011
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      Maybe Valerie and Jamie are right but to me a "London garage" immediately makes me think of an opravna more than a garaz - I suppose it depends on the type of firm that got set up.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Valerie Talacko
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 4:18 PM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "garage" meaning



      This seems to be garage in the garaz sense - a building in which a car
      is kept. A garage is often used as a dilna as well, though (as in the
      CR). Basically, the business started off in someone's home, but in the
      garage as opposed to around the kitchen table.

      On Wed, 2011-12-07 at 14:59 +0000, Tomas Mosler wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > Please could someone advise if "garage" in English can also refer to a
      > work shop (dilna)?
      >
      > "They founded the ABC company in a London garage."
      >
      > - Does this really mean a garage (garaz) where one keeps a car, or
      > eventually where cars are serviced (opravna), or can it have wider
      > meaning, too (including "dilna")?
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > Tomas
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Charlie Stanford Translations
      Suppose it could be either. I just don t really think of houses in London having garages - maybe in the suburbs, but I am a country bumpkin so know nothing.
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 7, 2011
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        Suppose it could be either. I just don't really think of houses in London having garages - maybe in the suburbs, but I am a country bumpkin so know nothing. I'd just ring up the firm if I were you.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Tomas Mosler
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 5:48 PM
        Subject: [Czechlist] Re: "garage" meaning



        Thanks for your answers.

        To specify, the firm's business was electronics, producing spare parts for radios (at the beginning).

        And they started in late 1930's - not sure if that does not reduce the chances for "garaz" a bit, but perhaps London was full of "garaz" ever since the cars got popular & affordable...?

        If this changes your ideas please let me know.

        Thank you!

        Tomas

        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie Stanford Translations" <charliestanfordtranslations@...> wrote:
        >
        > Maybe Valerie and Jamie are right but to me a "London garage" immediately makes me think of an opravna more than a garaz - I suppose it depends on the type of firm that got set up.
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Valerie Talacko
        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 4:18 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "garage" meaning
        >
        >
        >
        > This seems to be garage in the garaz sense - a building in which a car
        > is kept. A garage is often used as a dilna as well, though (as in the
        > CR). Basically, the business started off in someone's home, but in the
        > garage as opposed to around the kitchen table.
        >
        > On Wed, 2011-12-07 at 14:59 +0000, Tomas Mosler wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi,
        > >
        > > Please could someone advise if "garage" in English can also refer to a
        > > work shop (dilna)?
        > >
        > > "They founded the ABC company in a London garage."
        > >
        > > - Does this really mean a garage (garaz) where one keeps a car, or
        > > eventually where cars are serviced (opravna), or can it have wider
        > > meaning, too (including "dilna")?
        > >
        > > Thanks!
        > >
        > > Tomas
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Valerie Talacko
        This seems to be garage in the garaz sense - a building in which a car is kept. A garage is often used as a dilna as well, though (as in the CR). Basically,
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 7, 2011
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          This seems to be garage in the garaz sense - a building in which a car
          is kept. A garage is often used as a dilna as well, though (as in the
          CR). Basically, the business started off in someone's home, but in the
          garage as opposed to around the kitchen table.

          On Wed, 2011-12-07 at 14:59 +0000, Tomas Mosler wrote:
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > Please could someone advise if "garage" in English can also refer to a
          > work shop (dilna)?
          >
          > "They founded the ABC company in a London garage."
          >
          > - Does this really mean a garage (garaz) where one keeps a car, or
          > eventually where cars are serviced (opravna), or can it have wider
          > meaning, too (including "dilna")?
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
          > Tomas
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Tomas Mosler
          Thanks for your answers. To specify, the firm s business was electronics, producing spare parts for radios (at the beginning). And they started in late 1930 s
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 7, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks for your answers.

            To specify, the firm's business was electronics, producing spare parts for radios (at the beginning).

            And they started in late 1930's - not sure if that does not reduce the chances for "garaz" a bit, but perhaps London was full of "garaz" ever since the cars got popular & affordable...?

            If this changes your ideas please let me know.

            Thank you!

            Tomas


            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie Stanford Translations" <charliestanfordtranslations@...> wrote:
            >
            > Maybe Valerie and Jamie are right but to me a "London garage" immediately makes me think of an opravna more than a garaz - I suppose it depends on the type of firm that got set up.
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Valerie Talacko
            > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 4:18 PM
            > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "garage" meaning
            >
            >
            >
            > This seems to be garage in the garaz sense - a building in which a car
            > is kept. A garage is often used as a dilna as well, though (as in the
            > CR). Basically, the business started off in someone's home, but in the
            > garage as opposed to around the kitchen table.
            >
            > On Wed, 2011-12-07 at 14:59 +0000, Tomas Mosler wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi,
            > >
            > > Please could someone advise if "garage" in English can also refer to a
            > > work shop (dilna)?
            > >
            > > "They founded the ABC company in a London garage."
            > >
            > > - Does this really mean a garage (garaz) where one keeps a car, or
            > > eventually where cars are serviced (opravna), or can it have wider
            > > meaning, too (including "dilna")?
            > >
            > > Thanks!
            > >
            > > Tomas
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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