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Re: [Czechlist] Re: "in case" again

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  • James Kirchner
    It s wrong. In American English today that would sound like they re going to get the insurance money before the house burns down. The only place I ve found
    Message 1 of 43 , Nov 24, 2011
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      It's wrong. In American English today that would sound like they're going to get the insurance money before the house burns down.

      The only place I've found "in case" used to mean "if" in American English is in the prose of certain American novelists writing around the turn of the 20th century. For example, I'm finding it a lot right now in a book I'm reading by Theodore Dreiser. Otherwise, that usage is not part of my universe.

      Jamie

      On Nov 24, 2011, at 12:08 PM, Melvyn wrote:

      > Here is something from Practical English Usage that I have always been meaning to ask about:
      >
      > (p 257)
      > In American English, in case can sometimes be used in the same way as if:
      > In case the house burns down, we will get the insurance money (GB if)
      >
      > Does that sound right?



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    • Libor Zajíček
      Čili pro případ . 2013/3/5 James Kirchner ... -- Czeskie Słowo Dnia preklady
      Message 43 of 43 , Mar 5 5:27 AM
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        Čili "pro případ".

        2013/3/5 James Kirchner <czechlist@...>

        > **
        >
        >
        > If "in case" meant "if" here, it would be very exceptional.
        >
        > I think that in this sentence "in case" is intended to refer to "send"
        > rather than "use" or "reset", or it may just be linked to the meaning of
        > the whole sentence, which is that something is being done now in case
        > something happens later.
        >
        > I don't think they had in mind that you can reset your password in case
        > you forget it. That would mean to change it now so that you don't forget it
        > later. I think the idea is, "We're sending you this now in case you forget
        > your password later."
        >
        > This would be a good tree-diagramming exercise for a syntax class, because
        > it's structurally ambiguous.
        >
        > Jamie
        >
        > On Mar 5, 2013, at 5:38 AM, Melvyn wrote:
        >
        > > I just read this on my Gmail intro page:
        > >
        > > We'll send you a recovery code via SMS that you can use to reset your
        > password, in case you ever forget it.
        > >
        > > Looks like it is still occasionally used today to mean "if". Or is this
        > very exceptional?
        > >
        > > BR
        > >
        > > Melvyn
        >
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        >
        >



        --
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