Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

"Gastronomy"

Expand Messages
  • James Kirchner
    Do the British use various forms of the word gastronomy (gastronomic, etc.) as much as I see it in translations from Czech into English, or do you use it as
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 13, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Do the British use various forms of the word "gastronomy" (gastronomic, etc.) as much as I see it in translations from Czech into English, or do you use it as rarely as we North Americans do?

      For example, would the British say "gastronomic appliances", or would you say "culinary appliances", as Americans would? (For the home, we would call them "kitchen appliances".)

      I think the word "gastronomy" shows up in translations from Czech way too much. (Plus, I irrationally associate the word with gas and gastritis, making it kind of gag-inducing for me, so I avoid it.)

      Jamie
    • Melvyn
      I would tend to avoid gastronomic in the same way. Often sounds a bit 19th century or tongue-in-cheek to me. In some special contexts (e.g. gastronomicke
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 14, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        I would tend to avoid "gastronomic" in the same way. Often sounds a bit 19th century or tongue-in-cheek to me. In some special contexts (e.g. "gastronomicke sluzby") I have used "catering".


        > For example, would the British say "gastronomic appliances",

        A music hall master of ceremonies might.


        > or would you say "culinary appliances", as Americans would? (For the home, we would call them "kitchen appliances".)

        Check.

        BR

        M.
      • Melvyn
        ... Like exposition instead of exhibition , or architectonic instead of architectural . BR M.
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 14, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@...> wrote:
          >
          > Often sounds a bit 19th century...

          Like "exposition" instead of "exhibition", or "architectonic" instead of "architectural".

          BR

          M.
        • Melvyn
          Gurmansky is another awkward one. Our old French teacher told us that a gourmand is basically somebody who likes to pig himself, excuse gender bias, whereas a
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 14, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Gurmansky is another awkward one. Our old French teacher told us that a gourmand is basically somebody who likes to pig himself, excuse gender bias, whereas a gourmet at least has the excuse of indulging in the finer things in life while he is pigging himself. I understand this difference still holds, more or less, but it seems gurmansky is usually used in the epicurean sense of gourmet.


            BTW here is a music hall master of ceremonies for your delectation (first few seconds of each)
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-x4VBVmIDg
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuTcUe0OIh0


            BR

            M.

            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Often sounds a bit 19th century...
            >
            > Like "exposition" instead of "exhibition", or "architectonic" instead of "architectural".
            >
            > BR
            >
            > M.
            >
          • James Kirchner
            I learned the same thing about gourmand when I was 18, from a girl at my art school and her mother who were gourmet cooks. Your music hall master of
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 14, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              I learned the same thing about "gourmand" when I was 18, from a girl at my art school and her mother who were gourmet cooks.

              Your music hall master of ceremonies is approximately equivalent to an American circus ringmaster. That would be our association. However, we also associate the ringmaster also with pronunciations like "die-rect", etc., which are overblown here but not odd at all in the UK.

              (A couple weeks ago I had a discussion with a Brit over how to pronounce "Nicaragua" and "Antigua". My pronunciation made his skin crawl, and his pronunciation sounded to me like a small child just learning to read. Both pronunciations could be logically justified.)

              Jamie

              On Nov 14, 2011, at 7:25 AM, Melvyn wrote:

              >
              > Gurmansky is another awkward one. Our old French teacher told us that a gourmand is basically somebody who likes to pig himself, excuse gender bias, whereas a gourmet at least has the excuse of indulging in the finer things in life while he is pigging himself. I understand this difference still holds, more or less, but it seems gurmansky is usually used in the epicurean sense of gourmet.
              >
              > BTW here is a music hall master of ceremonies for your delectation (first few seconds of each)
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-x4VBVmIDg
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuTcUe0OIh0
              >
              > BR
              >
              > M.
              >
              > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@...> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Melvyn" <zehrovak@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Often sounds a bit 19th century...
              > >
              > > Like "exposition" instead of "exhibition", or "architectonic" instead of "architectural".
              > >
              > > BR
              > >
              > > M.
              > >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • James Kirchner
              Thanks for the reassurance, Melvyn. Jamie ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 14, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks for the reassurance, Melvyn.

                Jamie

                On Nov 14, 2011, at 5:35 AM, Melvyn wrote:

                > I would tend to avoid "gastronomic" in the same way. Often sounds a bit 19th century or tongue-in-cheek to me. In some special contexts (e.g. "gastronomicke sluzby") I have used "catering".
                >
                > > For example, would the British say "gastronomic appliances",
                >
                > A music hall master of ceremonies might.
                >
                > > or would you say "culinary appliances", as Americans would? (For the home, we would call them "kitchen appliances".)
                >
                > Check.
                >
                > BR
                >
                > M.
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.