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Re: [Czechlist] Re: "toastovy chleb"

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  • James Kirchner
    I actually did use the ingredients to go between the bread , or something to that effect. Maybe I could also have used items , but I don t like it that
    Message 1 of 34 , Sep 25, 2011
      I actually did use "the ingredients to go between the bread", or something to that effect. Maybe I could also have used "items", but I don't like it that much.

      We would never talk in the kitchen about the "filling" of a sandwich, and would be more likely to ask, "What do you want in your sandwich?"

      I still think that "filling" is highly unnatural, even in a formal context, and, based on other things I saw in the TM, I think it was written by either a Czech with almost perfect grammar, or a long-time anglophone resident of the Czech Republic who's simply forgotten how we say things.

      Jamie

      On Sep 25, 2011, at 2:14 PM, Melvyn wrote:

      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Josef Hlavac <joe@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > ... how about "ingredients" ?
      > >
      > > Or would that prompt people to name flour, yeast and other things that
      > > the bread is made of?
      >
      > Quite possibly. :-) You might find the word on the product packaging, but it is rather formal. It could sound tongue-in-cheek in casual chat, but in an objective description, well why not? Still, not as close to napln as filling or filler.
      >
      > BTW reminds me of the time I once found "ingredients: cheese and crudities" on my sandwich label. I believe crudit�s are raw vegetables (and fruit?) in French, whereas crudities in English are profanities and coarse expressions...But I digress.
      >
      > The issue is largely a stylistic one IMHO. I would certainly refer to a "filler" or "filling" in a formal description, recipe etc but in casual chat I would most probably just use a circumlocution like "summert to purrin me buttie" (something to put in my sandwich).
      >
      > >
      > > On 24.9.2011 16:58, James Kirchner wrote:
      > > > I can ask my friends, "What kind of foodley-doodle do you want in your sandwich?" and they will name the comestibles they want in it.
      >
      > That hungry, huh? :-))
      >
      > BTW here is an American author who refers to sandwich fillers:
      >
      > http://ezinearticles.com/?Recipes---Delicious-Sandwich-Fillers&id=3425971
      >
      > Or how about sandwich contents?
      > http://baltimoresandwichchallenge.blogspot.com/2009/05/sandwich-contents-white-cheddar-granny.html
      >
      > BR
      >
      > M.
      >
      > Mary had a little lamb,
      > Her father shot it dead.
      > And now it goes to school with her
      > Between two hunks of bread.
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • James Kirchner
      I actually did use the ingredients to go between the bread , or something to that effect. Maybe I could also have used items , but I don t like it that
      Message 34 of 34 , Sep 25, 2011
        I actually did use "the ingredients to go between the bread", or something to that effect. Maybe I could also have used "items", but I don't like it that much.

        We would never talk in the kitchen about the "filling" of a sandwich, and would be more likely to ask, "What do you want in your sandwich?"

        I still think that "filling" is highly unnatural, even in a formal context, and, based on other things I saw in the TM, I think it was written by either a Czech with almost perfect grammar, or a long-time anglophone resident of the Czech Republic who's simply forgotten how we say things.

        Jamie

        On Sep 25, 2011, at 2:14 PM, Melvyn wrote:

        > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Josef Hlavac <joe@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > ... how about "ingredients" ?
        > >
        > > Or would that prompt people to name flour, yeast and other things that
        > > the bread is made of?
        >
        > Quite possibly. :-) You might find the word on the product packaging, but it is rather formal. It could sound tongue-in-cheek in casual chat, but in an objective description, well why not? Still, not as close to napln as filling or filler.
        >
        > BTW reminds me of the time I once found "ingredients: cheese and crudities" on my sandwich label. I believe crudit�s are raw vegetables (and fruit?) in French, whereas crudities in English are profanities and coarse expressions...But I digress.
        >
        > The issue is largely a stylistic one IMHO. I would certainly refer to a "filler" or "filling" in a formal description, recipe etc but in casual chat I would most probably just use a circumlocution like "summert to purrin me buttie" (something to put in my sandwich).
        >
        > >
        > > On 24.9.2011 16:58, James Kirchner wrote:
        > > > I can ask my friends, "What kind of foodley-doodle do you want in your sandwich?" and they will name the comestibles they want in it.
        >
        > That hungry, huh? :-))
        >
        > BTW here is an American author who refers to sandwich fillers:
        >
        > http://ezinearticles.com/?Recipes---Delicious-Sandwich-Fillers&id=3425971
        >
        > Or how about sandwich contents?
        > http://baltimoresandwichchallenge.blogspot.com/2009/05/sandwich-contents-white-cheddar-granny.html
        >
        > BR
        >
        > M.
        >
        > Mary had a little lamb,
        > Her father shot it dead.
        > And now it goes to school with her
        > Between two hunks of bread.
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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