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Re: [Czechlist] 2 hairsplitters

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  • Sarka Rubkova
    Hi, purple is can be translated to Czech as purpurová or nachová and, I am sure, it is not fialová. It is not at all new word but, on the contrary, an
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 11, 2011
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      Hi,
      purple is can be translated to Czech as "purpurová" or "nachová" and, I am
      sure, it is not fialová. It is not at all new word but, on the contrary, an
      old one, see královský purpur nebo královský nach (royal purple).

      Sarka

      -------Original Message-------

      From: Charlie Stanford Translations
      Date: 9.9.2011 21:10:07
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Czechlist] 2 hairsplitters


      Can someone give me a bit of advice on this one please. I have been doing a
      backtranslation of something - i.e. written in English translated into Czech
      and then back into English. The original English has a list of colours, blue
      yellow, green, red, purple. The translation into Czech used purpurova and
      since every time I look at something which I understand to be "purple" and
      say that it is purpurova, my girlfriend corrects me and says it is "fialova"
      I backtranslated the word "purpurova" (based mainly on her description of
      it) as "crimson" or "maroon" and put a footnote to the effect that purpurova
      is not really used in Czech to refer to what we understand as bog-standard
      purple. I realise that colours are a bit of a subjective thing and one man's
      red is another man's green, but it has struck me how little anyone Czech
      seems to use the word purpurova and that unless you are getting all huey,
      fialova is purple - in the same way that in English we don't really bandy
      about the word "violet" to refer to a colour unless we are getting a bit
      arty.
      In the same job the English source says "Novel word" and this has been
      translated as "Slovo neni v seznamu" whioch comes from the glossary
      definition: "The subject is presented with a list of words. A 'Novel Word'
      is a word that wasn't in the list, but the subject thinks it was. A false
      positive recall. Extra word, Non-list word. All relating specifically to the
      context of the original list." I don't know why the translator was reluctant
      to use just "Nove slovo" but perhaps there is more to it than that, because
      the customer is asking for something that signifies "Fresh, new and original
      . Maybe the obvious "Nove slovo" is a bit too plain - would "novinka" or
      originalni slovo" work better or has someone got a better idea?
      Thanks for anything.
      Charlie


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Martin Janda
      Agreed, Sarka, but unlike purple, no native Czech (except for silly translators who blindly follow every twist of their English text) would use purpurova for a
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 11, 2011
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        Agreed, Sarka, but unlike purple, no native Czech (except for silly
        translators who blindly follow every twist of their English text) would
        use purpurova for a basic hue like purple. It's either artsy, or
        archaic. Yes, you can see kralovsky purpur/nach in historic books but
        that's about it.

        I'm with Matej in this.

        Martin


        Dne 11.9.2011 19:34, Sarka Rubkova napsal(a):
        > Hi,
        > purple is can be translated to Czech as "purpurová" or "nachová" and, I am
        > sure, it is not fialová. It is not at all new word but, on the contrary, an
        > old one, see královský purpur nebo královský nach (royal purple).
        >
        > Sarka
        >
        > -------Original Message-------
        >
        > From: Charlie Stanford Translations
        > Date: 9.9.2011 21:10:07
        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: [Czechlist] 2 hairsplitters
        >
        >
        > Can someone give me a bit of advice on this one please. I have been doing a
        > backtranslation of something - i.e. written in English translated into Czech
        > and then back into English. The original English has a list of colours, blue
        > yellow, green, red, purple. The translation into Czech used purpurova and
        > since every time I look at something which I understand to be "purple" and
        > say that it is purpurova, my girlfriend corrects me and says it is "fialova"
        > I backtranslated the word "purpurova" (based mainly on her description of
        > it) as "crimson" or "maroon" and put a footnote to the effect that purpurova
        > is not really used in Czech to refer to what we understand as bog-standard
        > purple. I realise that colours are a bit of a subjective thing and one man's
        > red is another man's green, but it has struck me how little anyone Czech
        > seems to use the word purpurova and that unless you are getting all huey,
        > fialova is purple - in the same way that in English we don't really bandy
        > about the word "violet" to refer to a colour unless we are getting a bit
        > arty.
        > In the same job the English source says "Novel word" and this has been
        > translated as "Slovo neni v seznamu" whioch comes from the glossary
        > definition: "The subject is presented with a list of words. A 'Novel Word'
        > is a word that wasn't in the list, but the subject thinks it was. A false
        > positive recall. Extra word, Non-list word. All relating specifically to the
        > context of the original list." I don't know why the translator was reluctant
        > to use just "Nove slovo" but perhaps there is more to it than that, because
        > the customer is asking for something that signifies "Fresh, new and original
        > . Maybe the obvious "Nove slovo" is a bit too plain - would "novinka" or
        > originalni slovo" work better or has someone got a better idea?
        > Thanks for anything.
        > Charlie
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
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