Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasiců

Expand Messages
  • Charlie Stanford Translations
    Hana said in here initial message for vyjezd that mozna ani nedojedou , so I am not sure that attendance works. If they get called out and then the fire
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 12 5:46 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hana said in here initial message for "vyjezd" that "mozna ani nedojedou", so I am not sure that attendance works. If they get called out and then the fire gets put out before they get there or the cat comes down the tree of its own accord then they haven't attended anything - they have just been called out - on a call-out or a response (as Valerie suggests).

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Valerie Talacko
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 2:21 PM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasiců



      Yes, I think "intervention" is a better translation.

      The Fire Brigade Intervention Model (in Victoria, Australia) is "a model
      that determines the time taken by a Fire Brigade to undertake its
      activities at a fire scene."
      http://www.mfb.vic.gov.au/Community-Safety/Workplace/Fire-Safety-Guidelines/GL-17.html

      and from the UK:

      Project: Fire brigade intervention model

      Objectives
      The aim of this project is to develop a Fire Brigade Intervention model
      for the UK. This will provide a formal structure for determining fire
      service attack time and a predicted ability of attending resources to
      deal with an anticipated size of fire at the point of intervention,
      within the physiological capabilities of firefighters.

      On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 14:15 +0200, Stephan von Pohl wrote:
      >
      > I'd say that "attended" here does not mean exactly the same as
      > "zasahovat". Depending on context, you can get away with it, though.
      >
      > S
      >
      > On 7/12/2011 2:13 PM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
      > > I can find numerous examples of the fire brigade attending.
      > >
      > > The immediate area was cordoned off and the Fire Brigade attended
      > the
      > > scene
      > >
      > http://www.clevelandfire.gov.uk/2011/05/evacuation-of-navigation-point-hartlepool/
      > >
      > > In the last month the Fire Brigade attended ten calls to assist
      > people
      > > trapped in lifts in Bounds Green Ward... and none in Bowes Ward!
      > >
      > http://www.bowesandbounds.org/forum/topics/london-fire-brigade-incident
      > >
      > > The Fire Brigade attended a blaze in Greenwich High Road last
      > Thursday
      > > (18th) afternoon.
      > >
      > > Four fire engines and 20 firefighters from Greenwich, Lee Green, New
      > > Cross and Lewisham stations were called out to the fire in a shop
      > unit
      > > near to the junction with Blackheath Road.
      > >
      > http://www.greenwich.co.uk/news/04298-fire-brigade-called-to-greenwich-high-road-blaze/
      > >
      > > The Fire Brigade attended and the fire was contained.
      > >
      > http://www.islingtongazette.co.uk/news/fire_at_arsenal_s_emirates_stadium_1_735897
      > >
      > > and lots of others. I googled "the fire brigade attended".
      > >
      > > However, I'd say it was used pretty much in the same way as
      > > "intervened" (a word which I associate more with the police, but I
      > > accept that it's also used of firemen). I'd say that "response"
      > > corresponded more to "vyjezd" and "attendance" to zasah.
      > >
      > > Valerie
      > >
      > > On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
      > > > Stephan, I'm in the US, and I purposely live in the US so that my
      > > English doesn't get polluted with Czenglish, Germlish or Froglish,
      > as it
      > > did when I lived in the CR. I've been back for a long time now, and
      > my
      > > English passes for normal -- so normal that I could work as a
      > magazine
      > > editor for a few years.
      > > >
      > > > It's perfectly normal in the US to say "intervention" in regard to
      > an
      > > act by a fire department, and if you google the exact phrase, you
      > can
      > > even find fire departments referring to what they do as
      > "intervention".
      > > At least one even has a page on their website called "Intervention
      > > Services".
      > > >
      > > > Stephan, in this case you may be suffering from that syndrome of
      > > avoiding Czenglish to the point of stigmatizing normal English.
      > > >
      > > > Anyway, all the Google hits I found for "attendance" in regard to
      > > fire departments referred to the firefighters' "pritomnost" on the
      > job
      > > (i.e., coming to work) or the whole department's "pritomnost" at
      > > ceremonies. "Attendance" was never used in the sense of "zasah".
      > > >
      > > > Jamie
      > > >
      > > > On Jul 12, 2011, at 6:49 AM, Stephan von Pohl wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > Jamie, I don't know know if you're in the Czech Republic or in
      > an
      > > > > English-speaking country, but to my taste "intervention" is too
      > > much of
      > > > > a direct translation and not something we would say in English.
      > It
      > > > > doesn't sound right to my ears. Although my "feel" for English
      > has
      > > been
      > > > > compromised (I've been in the CR for ten years), I'm still
      > convinced
      > > > > that intervention is not the answer. But I'm still struggling to
      > > come up
      > > > > with a good translation foe "zasah" - not only for firefighting
      > but
      > > for
      > > > > other instances as well.
      > > > >
      > > > > Anyone have any ideas/suggestions?
      > > > >
      > > > > Steve
      > > > >
      > > > > On 7/12/2011 12:33 PM, James Kirchner wrote:
      > > > > > "Attendance" doesn't mean "vyjezd" in any fire brigade sense,
      > as
      > > far as I know. It sounds as if they were merely "pritomni" or just
      > assisted.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I would use "intervention" for zasah ("fire department
      > > intervention", "firefighters intervened", etc.), and "call-out",
      > > "arrival" or something else for vyjezd, depending on the context.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > In many cases, for "vyjezd", you'd have to change the noun to
      > a
      > > verb and say that "firefighters arrived" or "firefighters drove to
      > the
      > > scene" or "drove out to the scene". ("Drive out" would not be
      > Czenglish,
      > > but you couldn't use it as a noun.) In some cases (kdyz nedojedou),
      > you
      > > could even say "leave the station" or "be dispatched".
      > ("Firefighters
      > > were dispatched to the scene", "dispatching of firefighters", etc.).
      > In
      > > some situations "deployment" would also work, but that sounds more
      > military.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Jamie
      > > > > >
      > > > > > On Jul 12, 2011, at 4:05 AM, Sarka Rubkova wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > >> Ahoj,
      > > > > >> zsah = response
      > > > > >> vjezd = attendence
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> Podle oborov normy, normu mi zapjili hasii jednoho provozu.
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> sarka
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> -------Original Message-------
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> From: Hana Jarolmov
      > > > > >> Date: 12.7.2011 9:47:51
      > > > > >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%
      > 40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > >> Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasic
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> Ahoj, poradite nekdo?
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> vyjezd - jenom vyjedou, mozna ani nedojedou, protoze jim
      > > nahlasi, ze je
      > > > > >> nepotrebuji
      > > > > >> zasah - zasahuji (ale neni to jenom haseni pozaru, je to
      > treba
      > > > > >> vystrihani cloveka z auta)
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> Idelne kratky termin.
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> Diky moc
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> H
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> ------------------------------------
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >>
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > ------------------------------------
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • James Kirchner
      This is why dispatch would work, unless the British object to it. Firefighters were dispatched to the scene, but the fire had been extinguished before they
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 12 5:48 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        This is why "dispatch" would work, unless the British object to it. "Firefighters were dispatched to the scene, but the fire had been extinguished before they arrived."

        Jamie

        On Jul 12, 2011, at 8:46 AM, Charlie Stanford Translations wrote:

        > Hana said in here initial message for "vyjezd" that "mozna ani nedojedou", so I am not sure that attendance works. If they get called out and then the fire gets put out before they get there or the cat comes down the tree of its own accord then they haven't attended anything - they have just been called out - on a call-out or a response (as Valerie suggests).
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Valerie Talacko
        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 2:21 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasiců
        >
        > Yes, I think "intervention" is a better translation.
        >
        > The Fire Brigade Intervention Model (in Victoria, Australia) is "a model
        > that determines the time taken by a Fire Brigade to undertake its
        > activities at a fire scene."
        > http://www.mfb.vic.gov.au/Community-Safety/Workplace/Fire-Safety-Guidelines/GL-17.html
        >
        > and from the UK:
        >
        > Project: Fire brigade intervention model
        >
        > Objectives
        > The aim of this project is to develop a Fire Brigade Intervention model
        > for the UK. This will provide a formal structure for determining fire
        > service attack time and a predicted ability of attending resources to
        > deal with an anticipated size of fire at the point of intervention,
        > within the physiological capabilities of firefighters.
        >
        > On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 14:15 +0200, Stephan von Pohl wrote:
        > >
        > > I'd say that "attended" here does not mean exactly the same as
        > > "zasahovat". Depending on context, you can get away with it, though.
        > >
        > > S
        > >
        > > On 7/12/2011 2:13 PM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
        > > > I can find numerous examples of the fire brigade attending.
        > > >
        > > > The immediate area was cordoned off and the Fire Brigade attended
        > > the
        > > > scene
        > > >
        > > http://www.clevelandfire.gov.uk/2011/05/evacuation-of-navigation-point-hartlepool/
        > > >
        > > > In the last month the Fire Brigade attended ten calls to assist
        > > people
        > > > trapped in lifts in Bounds Green Ward... and none in Bowes Ward!
        > > >
        > > http://www.bowesandbounds.org/forum/topics/london-fire-brigade-incident
        > > >
        > > > The Fire Brigade attended a blaze in Greenwich High Road last
        > > Thursday
        > > > (18th) afternoon.
        > > >
        > > > Four fire engines and 20 firefighters from Greenwich, Lee Green, New
        > > > Cross and Lewisham stations were called out to the fire in a shop
        > > unit
        > > > near to the junction with Blackheath Road.
        > > >
        > > http://www.greenwich.co.uk/news/04298-fire-brigade-called-to-greenwich-high-road-blaze/
        > > >
        > > > The Fire Brigade attended and the fire was contained.
        > > >
        > > http://www.islingtongazette.co.uk/news/fire_at_arsenal_s_emirates_stadium_1_735897
        > > >
        > > > and lots of others. I googled "the fire brigade attended".
        > > >
        > > > However, I'd say it was used pretty much in the same way as
        > > > "intervened" (a word which I associate more with the police, but I
        > > > accept that it's also used of firemen). I'd say that "response"
        > > > corresponded more to "vyjezd" and "attendance" to zasah.
        > > >
        > > > Valerie
        > > >
        > > > On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
        > > > > Stephan, I'm in the US, and I purposely live in the US so that my
        > > > English doesn't get polluted with Czenglish, Germlish or Froglish,
        > > as it
        > > > did when I lived in the CR. I've been back for a long time now, and
        > > my
        > > > English passes for normal -- so normal that I could work as a
        > > magazine
        > > > editor for a few years.
        > > > >
        > > > > It's perfectly normal in the US to say "intervention" in regard to
        > > an
        > > > act by a fire department, and if you google the exact phrase, you
        > > can
        > > > even find fire departments referring to what they do as
        > > "intervention".
        > > > At least one even has a page on their website called "Intervention
        > > > Services".
        > > > >
        > > > > Stephan, in this case you may be suffering from that syndrome of
        > > > avoiding Czenglish to the point of stigmatizing normal English.
        > > > >
        > > > > Anyway, all the Google hits I found for "attendance" in regard to
        > > > fire departments referred to the firefighters' "pritomnost" on the
        > > job
        > > > (i.e., coming to work) or the whole department's "pritomnost" at
        > > > ceremonies. "Attendance" was never used in the sense of "zasah".
        > > > >
        > > > > Jamie
        > > > >
        > > > > On Jul 12, 2011, at 6:49 AM, Stephan von Pohl wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > > Jamie, I don't know know if you're in the Czech Republic or in
        > > an
        > > > > > English-speaking country, but to my taste "intervention" is too
        > > > much of
        > > > > > a direct translation and not something we would say in English.
        > > It
        > > > > > doesn't sound right to my ears. Although my "feel" for English
        > > has
        > > > been
        > > > > > compromised (I've been in the CR for ten years), I'm still
        > > convinced
        > > > > > that intervention is not the answer. But I'm still struggling to
        > > > come up
        > > > > > with a good translation foe "zasah" - not only for firefighting
        > > but
        > > > for
        > > > > > other instances as well.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Anyone have any ideas/suggestions?
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Steve
        > > > > >
        > > > > > On 7/12/2011 12:33 PM, James Kirchner wrote:
        > > > > > > "Attendance" doesn't mean "vyjezd" in any fire brigade sense,
        > > as
        > > > far as I know. It sounds as if they were merely "pritomni" or just
        > > assisted.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > I would use "intervention" for zasah ("fire department
        > > > intervention", "firefighters intervened", etc.), and "call-out",
        > > > "arrival" or something else for vyjezd, depending on the context.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > In many cases, for "vyjezd", you'd have to change the noun to
        > > a
        > > > verb and say that "firefighters arrived" or "firefighters drove to
        > > the
        > > > scene" or "drove out to the scene". ("Drive out" would not be
        > > Czenglish,
        > > > but you couldn't use it as a noun.) In some cases (kdyz nedojedou),
        > > you
        > > > could even say "leave the station" or "be dispatched".
        > > ("Firefighters
        > > > were dispatched to the scene", "dispatching of firefighters", etc.).
        > > In
        > > > some situations "deployment" would also work, but that sounds more
        > > military.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Jamie
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > On Jul 12, 2011, at 4:05 AM, Sarka Rubkova wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >> Ahoj,
        > > > > > >> zsah = response
        > > > > > >> vjezd = attendence
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> Podle oborov normy, normu mi zapjili hasii jednoho provozu.
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> sarka
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> -------Original Message-------
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> From: Hana Jarolmov
        > > > > > >> Date: 12.7.2011 9:47:51
        > > > > > >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%
        > > 40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > > > >> Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasic
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> Ahoj, poradite nekdo?
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> vyjezd - jenom vyjedou, mozna ani nedojedou, protoze jim
        > > > nahlasi, ze je
        > > > > > >> nepotrebuji
        > > > > > >> zasah - zasahuji (ale neni to jenom haseni pozaru, je to
        > > treba
        > > > > > >> vystrihani cloveka z auta)
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> Idelne kratky termin.
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> Diky moc
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> H
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> ------------------------------------
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >>
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > ------------------------------------
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > ------------------------------------
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Valerie Talacko
        In the UK s fire statistics, they talk about false alarms attended, so maybe they don t always physically attend - attend is then shorthand for attend to
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 12 6:06 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          In the UK's fire statistics, they talk about "false alarms attended," so
          maybe they don't always physically attend - "attend" is then shorthand
          for "attend to" in such cases. However, they probably do like to go and
          convince themselves that there's nothing doing.


          On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 14:46 +0200, Charlie Stanford Translations wrote:
          >
          > Hana said in here initial message for "vyjezd" that "mozna ani
          > nedojedou", so I am not sure that attendance works. If they get called
          > out and then the fire gets put out before they get there or the cat
          > comes down the tree of its own accord then they haven't attended
          > anything - they have just been called out - on a call-out or a
          > response (as Valerie suggests).
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Valerie Talacko
          > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 2:21 PM
          > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasiců
          >
          > Yes, I think "intervention" is a better translation.
          >
          > The Fire Brigade Intervention Model (in Victoria, Australia) is "a
          > model
          > that determines the time taken by a Fire Brigade to undertake its
          > activities at a fire scene."
          > http://www.mfb.vic.gov.au/Community-Safety/Workplace/Fire-Safety-Guidelines/GL-17.html
          >
          > and from the UK:
          >
          > Project: Fire brigade intervention model
          >
          > Objectives
          > The aim of this project is to develop a Fire Brigade Intervention
          > model
          > for the UK. This will provide a formal structure for determining fire
          > service attack time and a predicted ability of attending resources to
          > deal with an anticipated size of fire at the point of intervention,
          > within the physiological capabilities of firefighters.
          >
          > On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 14:15 +0200, Stephan von Pohl wrote:
          > >
          > > I'd say that "attended" here does not mean exactly the same as
          > > "zasahovat". Depending on context, you can get away with it, though.
          > >
          > > S
          > >
          > > On 7/12/2011 2:13 PM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
          > > > I can find numerous examples of the fire brigade attending.
          > > >
          > > > The immediate area was cordoned off and the Fire Brigade attended
          > > the
          > > > scene
          > > >
          > >
          > http://www.clevelandfire.gov.uk/2011/05/evacuation-of-navigation-point-hartlepool/
          > > >
          > > > In the last month the Fire Brigade attended ten calls to assist
          > > people
          > > > trapped in lifts in Bounds Green Ward... and none in Bowes Ward!
          > > >
          > >
          > http://www.bowesandbounds.org/forum/topics/london-fire-brigade-incident
          > > >
          > > > The Fire Brigade attended a blaze in Greenwich High Road last
          > > Thursday
          > > > (18th) afternoon.
          > > >
          > > > Four fire engines and 20 firefighters from Greenwich, Lee Green,
          > New
          > > > Cross and Lewisham stations were called out to the fire in a shop
          > > unit
          > > > near to the junction with Blackheath Road.
          > > >
          > >
          > http://www.greenwich.co.uk/news/04298-fire-brigade-called-to-greenwich-high-road-blaze/
          > > >
          > > > The Fire Brigade attended and the fire was contained.
          > > >
          > >
          > http://www.islingtongazette.co.uk/news/fire_at_arsenal_s_emirates_stadium_1_735897
          > > >
          > > > and lots of others. I googled "the fire brigade attended".
          > > >
          > > > However, I'd say it was used pretty much in the same way as
          > > > "intervened" (a word which I associate more with the police, but I
          > > > accept that it's also used of firemen). I'd say that "response"
          > > > corresponded more to "vyjezd" and "attendance" to zasah.
          > > >
          > > > Valerie
          > > >
          > > > On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
          > > > > Stephan, I'm in the US, and I purposely live in the US so that
          > my
          > > > English doesn't get polluted with Czenglish, Germlish or Froglish,
          > > as it
          > > > did when I lived in the CR. I've been back for a long time now,
          > and
          > > my
          > > > English passes for normal -- so normal that I could work as a
          > > magazine
          > > > editor for a few years.
          > > > >
          > > > > It's perfectly normal in the US to say "intervention" in regard
          > to
          > > an
          > > > act by a fire department, and if you google the exact phrase, you
          > > can
          > > > even find fire departments referring to what they do as
          > > "intervention".
          > > > At least one even has a page on their website called "Intervention
          > > > Services".
          > > > >
          > > > > Stephan, in this case you may be suffering from that syndrome of
          > > > avoiding Czenglish to the point of stigmatizing normal English.
          > > > >
          > > > > Anyway, all the Google hits I found for "attendance" in regard
          > to
          > > > fire departments referred to the firefighters' "pritomnost" on the
          > > job
          > > > (i.e., coming to work) or the whole department's "pritomnost" at
          > > > ceremonies. "Attendance" was never used in the sense of "zasah".
          > > > >
          > > > > Jamie
          > > > >
          > > > > On Jul 12, 2011, at 6:49 AM, Stephan von Pohl wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > > Jamie, I don't know know if you're in the Czech Republic or in
          > > an
          > > > > > English-speaking country, but to my taste "intervention" is
          > too
          > > > much of
          > > > > > a direct translation and not something we would say in
          > English.
          > > It
          > > > > > doesn't sound right to my ears. Although my "feel" for English
          > > has
          > > > been
          > > > > > compromised (I've been in the CR for ten years), I'm still
          > > convinced
          > > > > > that intervention is not the answer. But I'm still struggling
          > to
          > > > come up
          > > > > > with a good translation foe "zasah" - not only for
          > firefighting
          > > but
          > > > for
          > > > > > other instances as well.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Anyone have any ideas/suggestions?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Steve
          > > > > >
          > > > > > On 7/12/2011 12:33 PM, James Kirchner wrote:
          > > > > > > "Attendance" doesn't mean "vyjezd" in any fire brigade
          > sense,
          > > as
          > > > far as I know. It sounds as if they were merely "pritomni" or just
          > > assisted.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > I would use "intervention" for zasah ("fire department
          > > > intervention", "firefighters intervened", etc.), and "call-out",
          > > > "arrival" or something else for vyjezd, depending on the context.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > In many cases, for "vyjezd", you'd have to change the noun
          > to
          > > a
          > > > verb and say that "firefighters arrived" or "firefighters drove to
          > > the
          > > > scene" or "drove out to the scene". ("Drive out" would not be
          > > Czenglish,
          > > > but you couldn't use it as a noun.) In some cases (kdyz
          > nedojedou),
          > > you
          > > > could even say "leave the station" or "be dispatched".
          > > ("Firefighters
          > > > were dispatched to the scene", "dispatching of firefighters",
          > etc.).
          > > In
          > > > some situations "deployment" would also work, but that sounds more
          > > military.
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Jamie
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > On Jul 12, 2011, at 4:05 AM, Sarka Rubkova wrote:
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >> Ahoj,
          > > > > > >> zsah = response
          > > > > > >> vjezd = attendence
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> Podle oborov normy, normu mi zapjili hasii jednoho provozu.
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> sarka
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> -------Original Message-------
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> From: Hana Jarolmov
          > > > > > >> Date: 12.7.2011 9:47:51
          > > > > > >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%
          > > 40yahoogroups.com>
          > > > > > >> Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasic
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> Ahoj, poradite nekdo?
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> vyjezd - jenom vyjedou, mozna ani nedojedou, protoze jim
          > > > nahlasi, ze je
          > > > > > >> nepotrebuji
          > > > > > >> zasah - zasahuji (ale neni to jenom haseni pozaru, je to
          > > treba
          > > > > > >> vystrihani cloveka z auta)
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> Idelne kratky termin.
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> Diky moc
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> H
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> ------------------------------------
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >>
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > ------------------------------------
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > ------------------------------------
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Valerie Talacko
          Despatched would be fine (as a column heading) All I d say is that zasah shouldn t be response . Valerie
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 12 6:09 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            "Despatched" would be fine (as a column heading)

            All I'd say is that "zasah" shouldn't be "response".

            Valerie



            On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 08:48 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
            >
            > This is why "dispatch" would work, unless the British object to it.
            > "Firefighters were dispatched to the scene, but the fire had been
            > extinguished before they arrived."
            >
            > Jamie
            >
            > On Jul 12, 2011, at 8:46 AM, Charlie Stanford Translations wrote:
            >
            > > Hana said in here initial message for "vyjezd" that "mozna ani
            > nedojedou", so I am not sure that attendance works. If they get called
            > out and then the fire gets put out before they get there or the cat
            > comes down the tree of its own accord then they haven't attended
            > anything - they have just been called out - on a call-out or a
            > response (as Valerie suggests).
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: Valerie Talacko
            > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            > > Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 2:21 PM
            > > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasiců
            > >
            > > Yes, I think "intervention" is a better translation.
            > >
            > > The Fire Brigade Intervention Model (in Victoria, Australia) is "a
            > model
            > > that determines the time taken by a Fire Brigade to undertake its
            > > activities at a fire scene."
            > >
            > http://www.mfb.vic.gov.au/Community-Safety/Workplace/Fire-Safety-Guidelines/GL-17.html
            > >
            > > and from the UK:
            > >
            > > Project: Fire brigade intervention model
            > >
            > > Objectives
            > > The aim of this project is to develop a Fire Brigade Intervention
            > model
            > > for the UK. This will provide a formal structure for determining
            > fire
            > > service attack time and a predicted ability of attending resources
            > to
            > > deal with an anticipated size of fire at the point of intervention,
            > > within the physiological capabilities of firefighters.
            > >
            > > On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 14:15 +0200, Stephan von Pohl wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I'd say that "attended" here does not mean exactly the same as
            > > > "zasahovat". Depending on context, you can get away with it,
            > though.
            > > >
            > > > S
            > > >
            > > > On 7/12/2011 2:13 PM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
            > > > > I can find numerous examples of the fire brigade attending.
            > > > >
            > > > > The immediate area was cordoned off and the Fire Brigade
            > attended
            > > > the
            > > > > scene
            > > > >
            > > >
            > http://www.clevelandfire.gov.uk/2011/05/evacuation-of-navigation-point-hartlepool/
            > > > >
            > > > > In the last month the Fire Brigade attended ten calls to assist
            > > > people
            > > > > trapped in lifts in Bounds Green Ward... and none in Bowes Ward!
            > > > >
            > > >
            > http://www.bowesandbounds.org/forum/topics/london-fire-brigade-incident
            > > > >
            > > > > The Fire Brigade attended a blaze in Greenwich High Road last
            > > > Thursday
            > > > > (18th) afternoon.
            > > > >
            > > > > Four fire engines and 20 firefighters from Greenwich, Lee Green,
            > New
            > > > > Cross and Lewisham stations were called out to the fire in a
            > shop
            > > > unit
            > > > > near to the junction with Blackheath Road.
            > > > >
            > > >
            > http://www.greenwich.co.uk/news/04298-fire-brigade-called-to-greenwich-high-road-blaze/
            > > > >
            > > > > The Fire Brigade attended and the fire was contained.
            > > > >
            > > >
            > http://www.islingtongazette.co.uk/news/fire_at_arsenal_s_emirates_stadium_1_735897
            > > > >
            > > > > and lots of others. I googled "the fire brigade attended".
            > > > >
            > > > > However, I'd say it was used pretty much in the same way as
            > > > > "intervened" (a word which I associate more with the police, but
            > I
            > > > > accept that it's also used of firemen). I'd say that "response"
            > > > > corresponded more to "vyjezd" and "attendance" to zasah.
            > > > >
            > > > > Valerie
            > > > >
            > > > > On Tue, 2011-07-12 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
            > > > > > Stephan, I'm in the US, and I purposely live in the US so that
            > my
            > > > > English doesn't get polluted with Czenglish, Germlish or
            > Froglish,
            > > > as it
            > > > > did when I lived in the CR. I've been back for a long time now,
            > and
            > > > my
            > > > > English passes for normal -- so normal that I could work as a
            > > > magazine
            > > > > editor for a few years.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > It's perfectly normal in the US to say "intervention" in
            > regard to
            > > > an
            > > > > act by a fire department, and if you google the exact phrase,
            > you
            > > > can
            > > > > even find fire departments referring to what they do as
            > > > "intervention".
            > > > > At least one even has a page on their website called
            > "Intervention
            > > > > Services".
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Stephan, in this case you may be suffering from that syndrome
            > of
            > > > > avoiding Czenglish to the point of stigmatizing normal English.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Anyway, all the Google hits I found for "attendance" in regard
            > to
            > > > > fire departments referred to the firefighters' "pritomnost" on
            > the
            > > > job
            > > > > (i.e., coming to work) or the whole department's "pritomnost" at
            > > > > ceremonies. "Attendance" was never used in the sense of "zasah".
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Jamie
            > > > > >
            > > > > > On Jul 12, 2011, at 6:49 AM, Stephan von Pohl wrote:
            > > > > >
            > > > > > > Jamie, I don't know know if you're in the Czech Republic or
            > in
            > > > an
            > > > > > > English-speaking country, but to my taste "intervention" is
            > too
            > > > > much of
            > > > > > > a direct translation and not something we would say in
            > English.
            > > > It
            > > > > > > doesn't sound right to my ears. Although my "feel" for
            > English
            > > > has
            > > > > been
            > > > > > > compromised (I've been in the CR for ten years), I'm still
            > > > convinced
            > > > > > > that intervention is not the answer. But I'm still
            > struggling to
            > > > > come up
            > > > > > > with a good translation foe "zasah" - not only for
            > firefighting
            > > > but
            > > > > for
            > > > > > > other instances as well.
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Anyone have any ideas/suggestions?
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > Steve
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > On 7/12/2011 12:33 PM, James Kirchner wrote:
            > > > > > > > "Attendance" doesn't mean "vyjezd" in any fire brigade
            > sense,
            > > > as
            > > > > far as I know. It sounds as if they were merely "pritomni" or
            > just
            > > > assisted.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > I would use "intervention" for zasah ("fire department
            > > > > intervention", "firefighters intervened", etc.), and "call-out",
            > > > > "arrival" or something else for vyjezd, depending on the
            > context.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > In many cases, for "vyjezd", you'd have to change the noun
            > to
            > > > a
            > > > > verb and say that "firefighters arrived" or "firefighters drove
            > to
            > > > the
            > > > > scene" or "drove out to the scene". ("Drive out" would not be
            > > > Czenglish,
            > > > > but you couldn't use it as a noun.) In some cases (kdyz
            > nedojedou),
            > > > you
            > > > > could even say "leave the station" or "be dispatched".
            > > > ("Firefighters
            > > > > were dispatched to the scene", "dispatching of firefighters",
            > etc.).
            > > > In
            > > > > some situations "deployment" would also work, but that sounds
            > more
            > > > military.
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Jamie
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > On Jul 12, 2011, at 4:05 AM, Sarka Rubkova wrote:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >> Ahoj,
            > > > > > > >> zsah = response
            > > > > > > >> vjezd = attendence
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> Podle oborov normy, normu mi zapjili hasii jednoho
            > provozu.
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> sarka
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> -------Original Message-------
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> From: Hana Jarolmov
            > > > > > > >> Date: 12.7.2011 9:47:51
            > > > > > > >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%
            > > > 40yahoogroups.com>
            > > > > > > >> Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: vyjezd vs. zasah hasic
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> Ahoj, poradite nekdo?
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> vyjezd - jenom vyjedou, mozna ani nedojedou, protoze jim
            > > > > nahlasi, ze je
            > > > > > > >> nepotrebuji
            > > > > > > >> zasah - zasahuji (ale neni to jenom haseni pozaru, je to
            > > > treba
            > > > > > > >> vystrihani cloveka z auta)
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> Idelne kratky termin.
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> Diky moc
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> H
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> ------------------------------------
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >>
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > ------------------------------------
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > ------------------------------------
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • jakub.skrebsky@googlemail.com
            Napriklad ve vete: The hotel also has rooms which are adapted for guests with special needs. Dorazil tenhle politicky korektni newspeak uz i do Cech, nebo se
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 12 7:45 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              Napriklad ve vete: The hotel also has rooms which are adapted for guests
              with special needs.

              Dorazil tenhle politicky korektni newspeak uz i do Cech, nebo se porad
              jeste da beztrestne rici "telesne postizeni"?

              Diky
              Jakub


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jaroslav Hejzlar
              Ahoj, Jakube! Problem je v tom, ze existuji i jine druhy postizeni nez jen telesne, napriklad mentalni/dusevni, smyslove nebo kombinovane postizeni. Takze ten
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 12 8:02 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                Ahoj, Jakube!
                Problem je v tom, ze existuji i jine druhy postizeni nez jen telesne, napriklad mentalni/dusevni, smyslove nebo kombinovane postizeni. Takze ten newspeak je docela opravneny a klidne bych to prevedl do cestiny “i s chlupama”, tedy jako “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, coz je mimochodem vyraz na webu dosti frekventovany.
                S pozdravem,
                Jarda

                From: jakub.skrebsky@...
                Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 4:45 PM
                To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz



                Napriklad ve vete: The hotel also has rooms which are adapted for guests
                with special needs.

                Dorazil tenhle politicky korektni newspeak uz i do Cech, nebo se porad
                jeste da beztrestne rici "telesne postizeni"?

                Diky
                Jakub

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • jakub.skrebsky@googlemail.com
                Diky, prave to jsem potreboval vedet, jestli se v ceskem prostredi bezne pouziva “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, treba i ve skolstvi apod. Ale zrovna v
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 12 8:15 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Diky, prave to jsem potreboval vedet, jestli se v ceskem prostredi bezne
                  pouziva “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, treba i ve skolstvi apod.
                  Ale zrovna v pripade toho hotelu jde podle me o obycejny bezbarierovy
                  pristup, nebot mentalne postizeny host prece nepotrebuje specialne
                  upravenou koupelnu.

                  On 12/07/2011 16:02, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
                  >
                  > Ahoj, Jakube!
                  > Problem je v tom, ze existuji i jine druhy postizeni nez jen telesne,
                  > napriklad mentalni/dusevni, smyslove nebo kombinovane postizeni. Takze
                  > ten newspeak je docela opravneny a klidne bych to prevedl do cestiny
                  > “i s chlupama”, tedy jako “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, coz je
                  > mimochodem vyraz na webu dosti frekventovany.
                  > S pozdravem,
                  > Jarda
                  >
                  > From: jakub.skrebsky@...
                  > <mailto:jakub.skrebsky%40googlemail.com>
                  > Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 4:45 PM
                  > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                  >
                  > Napriklad ve vete: The hotel also has rooms which are adapted for guests
                  > with special needs.
                  >
                  > Dorazil tenhle politicky korektni newspeak uz i do Cech, nebo se porad
                  > jeste da beztrestne rici "telesne postizeni"?
                  >
                  > Diky
                  > Jakub
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Jaroslav Hejzlar
                  Mentalne postizeny mozna ne, ale clovek s urcitym smyslovym postizenim (napriklad slabozraky) by urcite uvital treba vyrazne barevne odlisene vypinace,
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 12 8:28 AM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Mentalne postizeny mozna ne, ale clovek s urcitym smyslovym postizenim (napriklad slabozraky) by urcite uvital treba vyrazne barevne odlisene vypinace, vodovodni kohoutky apod. Ale to jen na okraj, pravdepodobne se skutecne jedna o zcela bezne upravy pro vozickare.
                    J.

                    From: jakub.skrebsky@...
                    Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 5:15 PM
                    To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz


                    Diky, prave to jsem potreboval vedet, jestli se v ceskem prostredi bezne
                    pouziva “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, treba i ve skolstvi apod.
                    Ale zrovna v pripade toho hotelu jde podle me o obycejny bezbarierovy
                    pristup, nebot mentalne postizeny host prece nepotrebuje specialne
                    upravenou koupelnu.

                    On 12/07/2011 16:02, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
                    >
                    > Ahoj, Jakube!
                    > Problem je v tom, ze existuji i jine druhy postizeni nez jen telesne,
                    > napriklad mentalni/dusevni, smyslove nebo kombinovane postizeni. Takze
                    > ten newspeak je docela opravneny a klidne bych to prevedl do cestiny
                    > “i s chlupama”, tedy jako “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, coz je
                    > mimochodem vyraz na webu dosti frekventovany.
                    > S pozdravem,
                    > Jarda
                    >
                    > From: mailto:jakub.skrebsky%40googlemail.com
                    > <mailto:jakub.skrebsky%40googlemail.com>
                    > Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 4:45 PM
                    > To: mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                    >
                    > Napriklad ve vete: The hotel also has rooms which are adapted for guests
                    > with special needs.
                    >
                    > Dorazil tenhle politicky korektni newspeak uz i do Cech, nebo se porad
                    > jeste da beztrestne rici "telesne postizeni"?
                    >
                    > Diky
                    > Jakub
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Matej Klimes
                    Special needs se mimo jine ve skolstvi (Britskem) pouziva jako univerzalni oznaceni pro deti, ktere maji nejake problemy s ucenim (dyslexii, poruchy
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 12 8:35 AM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      'Special needs' se mimo jine ve skolstvi (Britskem) pouziva jako
                      univerzalni oznaceni pro deti, ktere maji nejake problemy s ucenim
                      (dyslexii, poruchy soustredeni, atd..).

                      nerikam, ze tohle je ten pripad, jen ze jde o to nejvseobecnejsi
                      oznaceni, takze bych se zdrahal pouzit cokoli konkretniho jako vozickar
                      nebo postizeny...

                      Dost casto na to ve smeru do CZ narazim, jak to rict nejak obecne,
                      myslim, ze na to moc nemame slova, diky tomu, jak Komousi vsichni
                      takove lidi nekam zavirali... rozhodne slovo 'postizeny' myslim neni
                      moc slusne a jim samotnym se pokud vim dost nelibi - nedivim se jim.

                      M
                      ------ Original Message ------
                      From: "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@...>
                      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: 12.7.2011 17:28:21
                      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                      > Mentalne postizeny mozna ne, ale clovek s urcitym smyslovym
                      >postizenim (napriklad slabozraky) by urcite uvital treba vyrazne
                      >barevne odlisene vypinace, vodovodni kohoutky apod. Ale to jen na
                      >okraj, pravdepodobne se skutecne jedna o zcela bezne upravy pro
                      >vozickare.
                      >J.
                      >
                      >From: jakub.skrebsky@...
                      >Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 5:15 PM
                      >To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                      >
                      >Diky, prave to jsem potreboval vedet, jestli se v ceskem prostredi
                      >bezne
                      >pouziva “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, treba i ve skolstvi apod.
                      >Ale zrovna v pripade toho hotelu jde podle me o obycejny bezbarierovy
                      >pristup, nebot mentalne postizeny host prece nepotrebuje specialne
                      >upravenou koupelnu.
                      >
                      >On 12/07/2011 16:02, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Ahoj, Jakube!
                      >> Problem je v tom, ze existuji i jine druhy postizeni nez jen
                      >telesne,
                      >> napriklad mentalni/dusevni, smyslove nebo kombinovane postizeni.
                      >Takze
                      >> ten newspeak je docela opravneny a klidne bych to prevedl do cestiny
                      >> “i s chlupama”, tedy jako “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, coz je
                      >> mimochodem vyraz na webu dosti frekventovany.
                      >> S pozdravem,
                      >> Jarda
                      >>
                      >> From: mailto:jakub.skrebsky%40googlemail.com
                      >> <mailto:jakub.skrebsky%40googlemail.com>
                      >> Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 4:45 PM
                      >> To: mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com
                      ><mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>
                      >> Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                      >>
                      >> Napriklad ve vete: The hotel also has rooms which are adapted for
                      >guests
                      >> with special needs.
                      >>
                      >> Dorazil tenhle politicky korektni newspeak uz i do Cech, nebo se
                      >porad
                      >> jeste da beztrestne rici "telesne postizeni"?
                      >>
                      >> Diky
                      >> Jakub
                      >>
                      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >>
                      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >>
                      >>
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >__________ Informace od ESET Smart Security, verze databaze 6287
                      >(20110712) __________
                      >
                      >Tuto zpravu proveril ESET Smart Security.
                      >
                      >http://www.eset.cz/


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Mgr. Helena Šubrtová
                      Pouziva se osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami. (zahrnuje vse mozne) H. ... www.kvalitnipreklad.cz
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jul 14 9:40 AM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Pouziva se osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami.
                        (zahrnuje vse mozne)
                        H.

                        > ------------ Původní zpráva ------------
                        > Od: Matej Klimes <mklimes@...>
                        > Předmět: Re[2]: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                        > Datum: 12.7.2011 17:36:23
                        > ----------------------------------------
                        > 'Special needs' se mimo jine ve skolstvi (Britskem) pouziva jako
                        > univerzalni oznaceni pro deti, ktere maji nejake problemy s ucenim
                        > (dyslexii, poruchy soustredeni, atd..).
                        >
                        > nerikam, ze tohle je ten pripad, jen ze jde o to nejvseobecnejsi
                        > oznaceni, takze bych se zdrahal pouzit cokoli konkretniho jako vozickar
                        > nebo postizeny...
                        >
                        > Dost casto na to ve smeru do CZ narazim, jak to rict nejak obecne,
                        > myslim, ze na to moc nemame slova, diky tomu, jak Komousi vsichni
                        > takove lidi nekam zavirali... rozhodne slovo 'postizeny' myslim neni
                        > moc slusne a jim samotnym se pokud vim dost nelibi - nedivim se jim.
                        >
                        > M
                        > ------ Original Message ------
                        > From: "Jaroslav Hejzlar" <jaroslav.hejzlar@...>
                        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: 12.7.2011 17:28:21
                        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                        > > Mentalne postizeny mozna ne, ale clovek s urcitym smyslovym
                        > >postizenim (napriklad slabozraky) by urcite uvital treba vyrazne
                        > >barevne odlisene vypinace, vodovodni kohoutky apod. Ale to jen na
                        > >okraj, pravdepodobne se skutecne jedna o zcela bezne upravy pro
                        > >vozickare.
                        > >J.
                        > >
                        > >From: jakub.skrebsky@...
                        > >Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 5:15 PM
                        > >To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        > >Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                        > >
                        > >Diky, prave to jsem potreboval vedet, jestli se v ceskem prostredi
                        > >bezne
                        > >pouziva “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, treba i ve skolstvi apod.
                        > >Ale zrovna v pripade toho hotelu jde podle me o obycejny bezbarierovy
                        > >pristup, nebot mentalne postizeny host prece nepotrebuje specialne
                        > >upravenou koupelnu.
                        > >
                        > >On 12/07/2011 16:02, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
                        > >>
                        > >> Ahoj, Jakube!
                        > >> Problem je v tom, ze existuji i jine druhy postizeni nez jen
                        > >telesne,
                        > >> napriklad mentalni/dusevni, smyslove nebo kombinovane postizeni.
                        > >Takze
                        > >> ten newspeak je docela opravneny a klidne bych to prevedl do cestiny
                        > >> “i s chlupama”, tedy jako “osoby se zvlastnimi potrebami”, coz je
                        > >> mimochodem vyraz na webu dosti frekventovany.
                        > >> S pozdravem,
                        > >> Jarda
                        > >>
                        > >> From: mailto:jakub.skrebsky%40googlemail.com
                        > >> <mailto:jakub.skrebsky%40googlemail.com>
                        > >> Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 4:45 PM
                        > >> To: mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com
                        > ><mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > >> Subject: [Czechlist] TERM: special needs - obecny dotaz
                        > >>
                        > >> Napriklad ve vete: The hotel also has rooms which are adapted for
                        > >guests
                        > >> with special needs.
                        > >>
                        > >> Dorazil tenhle politicky korektni newspeak uz i do Cech, nebo se
                        > >porad
                        > >> jeste da beztrestne rici "telesne postizeni"?
                        > >>
                        > >> Diky
                        > >> Jakub
                        > >>
                        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >>
                        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >
                        > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >__________ Informace od ESET Smart Security, verze databaze 6287
                        > >(20110712) __________
                        > >
                        > >Tuto zpravu proveril ESET Smart Security.
                        > >
                        > >http://www.eset.cz/
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        www.kvalitnipreklad.cz
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.