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Re: Translation rate basis

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  • Vit Ruzicka
    Hello Otto, thank you for the in-side answer. Naturally, I am far from being content with a provision of such information to a customer, not even to a
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 13, 2000
      Hello Otto,
      thank you for the in-side answer. Naturally, I am far from being content with a provision of such information to a customer, not even to a prospective one. My point is that the costs are getting higher and rates (and some customers) tend to resist this reality of life.
      All the best
      Vit
    • Michael Grant
      ... I d say it s none of their damn business how you arrive at your prices. If your rates are competitive for the technical, linguistic, and service quality
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 15, 2000
        >A�customer of mine (at the prospective stage yet, though) has asked
        >for a substantitation of the translation price, ie costs based on
        >resources employed plus adequate salary.

        I'd say it's none of their damn business how you arrive at your
        prices. If your rates are competitive for the technical, linguistic,
        and service quality you provide, then I'd tell 'em to take it or
        leave it.

        Michael
      • Kostas Zgafas
        A customer of mine (at the prospective stage yet, though) has asked ... You are right, Michael, and when I replied to this issue, I did not mean to comply
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 15, 2000
          " >A customer of mine (at the prospective stage yet, though) has asked
          > >for a substantitation of the translation price, ie costs based on
          > >resources employed plus adequate salary.
          >
          > I'd say it's none of their damn business how you arrive at your
          > prices. If your rates are competitive for the technical, linguistic,
          > and service quality you provide, then I'd tell 'em to take it or
          > leave it.
          >
          > Michael

          You are right, Michael, and when I replied to this issue, I did not mean to
          comply with this strange requirement, but rather to embrace it as the issue
          standing alone: "expenses in doing translation business", which might be of
          interest for us.

          HOWEVER, I would like to add that some big, really big multinational
          companies have included this requirement in their subcontractor policy. But,
          to get a contract from such big company means to get high volume work
          secured for several years. In return, these big companies push their
          subcontractors really very hard, including inquiries of their expenses,
          pushing their price as low as they can get, and also try to set-up the
          contract in the most advantageous way for themselves, and the least
          advantageous way for contractors.

          Kostas
        • Michael Grant
          ... Count me out. If they re going to own you body and soul anyway, let em hire you as an employee and pay your health insurance and pension contributions.
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 15, 2000
            >In return, these big companies push their
            >subcontractors really very hard, including inquiries of their expenses,
            >pushing their price as low as they can get, and also try to set-up the
            >contract in the most advantageous way for themselves, and the least
            >advantageous way for contractors.

            Count me out. If they're going to own you body and soul anyway, let
            'em hire you as an employee and pay your health insurance and pension
            contributions.

            Just MHO. :-)

            Michael
          • Otto Pacholik
            ... I think this is the most dangerous way how to run your business. This may lead to you dependence on one source of income. And consequently, you become more
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 16, 2000
              > But,
              > to get a contract from such big company means to get high volume work
              > secured for several years.

              I think this is the most dangerous way how to run your business. This may
              lead to you dependence on one source of income. And consequently, you become
              more "flexible" to any request of your one (two, three) big multinational
              customers. I have always tried to avoid such situation. Once such customers
              drops you this might mean a couple of months before you recover from such
              loss. Of course, if you manage to have big volume customer it would be
              nonsense to let him go. However, I prefer to subcontract a part of my work
              (even if this means more proofreading for me), in order to both keep my
              customer satisfied and avoid my dependence on him.

              Just MHO

              Otto
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