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Re: Translation rate basis

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  • Kostas Zgafas
    Vit wrote: My issue is: Has anybody tried lately to calculate the worth of translating resources necessary for the quality translation work? Ie,
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 12, 2000
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      Vit wrote:
      My issue is: Has anybody tried lately to calculate the worth of translating resources necessary for the quality translation work? Ie, computer+software+reference literature+overheads (Internet, phone, ...), etc.

      You may add to it:
      - marketing expenses
      - I consider as a significant expense the time I need to spend on activities related to translating, but during which
      I do not translate, by other words - do not generate any income: time spent on marketing, writing invoices, various paperwork, going to bank, participation in discussion groups, etc, etc. - doing anything related to translating
      - I need to have two computers for the case if one of them goes out of service
      - mobile phone to be accessible when not at home
      - SW, OS
      - subscribing foreign journals
      - I would not hesitate to add all necessary expenses I would need to spend, but I can�t afford them becouse of low local rates, and to present a negative salary:various international gatherings, annual ATA conferences,
      - etc
      - etc

      K.ostas
    • Jirka Bolech
      ... substantitation of the translation price, ie costs based on resources employed plus adequate salary. Your potential customer s inquiry is quite absurd. It
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 13, 2000
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        Vit Ruzicka wrote:

        > A customer of mine (at the prospective stage yet, though) has asked for a
        substantitation of the translation price, ie costs based on resources
        employed plus adequate salary.

        Your potential customer's inquiry is quite absurd. It reminds me strongly of
        the communist mode of thinking; you may still remember too. On the other
        hand, they might easily find your price very low in the light of such
        considerations, as Otto has pointed out, although Otto's account of a
        translator's expenses is close to the ideal condition - not my situation.
        You could easily impress those who ask with such theoretical costs of doing
        the job at a professional standard, but I don't think you should disclose
        your actual expenses, whether it's money or time. I don't simply think that
        this kind of question can be answered satisfactorily; you'll always drift in
        the midst of theoretical price ranges and real individuals' spendings with a
        high statistic deviation. Just mu view.

        Jirka Bolech
        Liberec, CR
      • Vit Ruzicka
        Hello Otto, thank you for the in-side answer. Naturally, I am far from being content with a provision of such information to a customer, not even to a
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 13, 2000
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          Hello Otto,
          thank you for the in-side answer. Naturally, I am far from being content with a provision of such information to a customer, not even to a prospective one. My point is that the costs are getting higher and rates (and some customers) tend to resist this reality of life.
          All the best
          Vit
        • Michael Grant
          ... I d say it s none of their damn business how you arrive at your prices. If your rates are competitive for the technical, linguistic, and service quality
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 15, 2000
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            >A�customer of mine (at the prospective stage yet, though) has asked
            >for a substantitation of the translation price, ie costs based on
            >resources employed plus adequate salary.

            I'd say it's none of their damn business how you arrive at your
            prices. If your rates are competitive for the technical, linguistic,
            and service quality you provide, then I'd tell 'em to take it or
            leave it.

            Michael
          • Kostas Zgafas
            A customer of mine (at the prospective stage yet, though) has asked ... You are right, Michael, and when I replied to this issue, I did not mean to comply
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 15, 2000
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              " >A customer of mine (at the prospective stage yet, though) has asked
              > >for a substantitation of the translation price, ie costs based on
              > >resources employed plus adequate salary.
              >
              > I'd say it's none of their damn business how you arrive at your
              > prices. If your rates are competitive for the technical, linguistic,
              > and service quality you provide, then I'd tell 'em to take it or
              > leave it.
              >
              > Michael

              You are right, Michael, and when I replied to this issue, I did not mean to
              comply with this strange requirement, but rather to embrace it as the issue
              standing alone: "expenses in doing translation business", which might be of
              interest for us.

              HOWEVER, I would like to add that some big, really big multinational
              companies have included this requirement in their subcontractor policy. But,
              to get a contract from such big company means to get high volume work
              secured for several years. In return, these big companies push their
              subcontractors really very hard, including inquiries of their expenses,
              pushing their price as low as they can get, and also try to set-up the
              contract in the most advantageous way for themselves, and the least
              advantageous way for contractors.

              Kostas
            • Michael Grant
              ... Count me out. If they re going to own you body and soul anyway, let em hire you as an employee and pay your health insurance and pension contributions.
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 15, 2000
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                >In return, these big companies push their
                >subcontractors really very hard, including inquiries of their expenses,
                >pushing their price as low as they can get, and also try to set-up the
                >contract in the most advantageous way for themselves, and the least
                >advantageous way for contractors.

                Count me out. If they're going to own you body and soul anyway, let
                'em hire you as an employee and pay your health insurance and pension
                contributions.

                Just MHO. :-)

                Michael
              • Otto Pacholik
                ... I think this is the most dangerous way how to run your business. This may lead to you dependence on one source of income. And consequently, you become more
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 16, 2000
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                  > But,
                  > to get a contract from such big company means to get high volume work
                  > secured for several years.

                  I think this is the most dangerous way how to run your business. This may
                  lead to you dependence on one source of income. And consequently, you become
                  more "flexible" to any request of your one (two, three) big multinational
                  customers. I have always tried to avoid such situation. Once such customers
                  drops you this might mean a couple of months before you recover from such
                  loss. Of course, if you manage to have big volume customer it would be
                  nonsense to let him go. However, I prefer to subcontract a part of my work
                  (even if this means more proofreading for me), in order to both keep my
                  customer satisfied and avoid my dependence on him.

                  Just MHO

                  Otto
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