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[Czechlist] TERM: fond pracovni doby

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Hi all, Is there an expression in English to correspond with fond in Czech to refer to a volume of working hours that is prescribed or expected for most
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 3, 2010
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      Hi all,

      Is there an expression in English to correspond with "fond" in Czech to
      refer to a volume of working hours that is prescribed or expected for
      most workers in accordance with regulations? It typically reflects the
      legal volume of working hours minus national holidays and is often
      specified on a weekly, monthly, and annual basis. If this concept
      doesn't really work in English speaking countries, what descriptive
      translation could be easy to comprehend?



      Jirka Bolech

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    • Melvyn
      Hi Jirka, I see this term has been dealt with on Proz: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/czech_to_english/human_resources/2928377-fond_pracovn%C3%AD_doby.html though I
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 3, 2010
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        Hi Jirka,

        I see this term has been dealt with on Proz:

        http://www.proz.com/kudoz/czech_to_english/human_resources/2928377-fond_pracovn%C3%AD_doby.html

        though I wouldn't necessarily go along with any of the suggested answers as the ideal solution.

        As far as I am aware, this is referred to both officially and informally in Britain as "basic working hours", "basic hours", "basic time" and variations on that theme. Familiarly we just say "basic", e.g.: "at my job you get 38 hours a week basic, and any overtime on top of that is paid time and a half" (i.e. 1,5 x basic).

        This seems to be common enough usage on government sites:

        Overtime generally means any work over the basic working hours included in your contract.

        http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Employment/Employees/WorkingHoursAndTimeOff/DG_10028439

        BR

        M.


        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Jirka Bolech <jirka.bolech@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi all,
        >
        > Is there an expression in English to correspond with "fond" in Czech to
        > refer to a volume of working hours that is prescribed or expected for
        > most workers in accordance with regulations? It typically reflects the
        > legal volume of working hours minus national holidays and is often
        > specified on a weekly, monthly, and annual basis. If this concept
        > doesn't really work in English speaking countries, what descriptive
        > translation could be easy to comprehend?
        >
        >
        >
        > Jirka Bolech
        >
        > _______________________________________________
        > Czechlist mailing list
        > Czechlist@...
        > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
        >
      • Valerie Talacko
        Yes - I d also go with basic working hours . Valerie
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 3, 2010
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          Yes - I'd also go with "basic working hours".

          Valerie

          On Sun, 2010-10-03 at 09:54 +0000, Melvyn wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jirka,
          >
          > I see this term has been dealt with on Proz:
          >
          > http://www.proz.com/kudoz/czech_to_english/human_resources/2928377-fond_pracovn%C3%AD_doby.html
          >
          > though I wouldn't necessarily go along with any of the suggested
          > answers as the ideal solution.
          >
          > As far as I am aware, this is referred to both officially and
          > informally in Britain as "basic working hours", "basic hours", "basic
          > time" and variations on that theme. Familiarly we just say "basic",
          > e.g.: "at my job you get 38 hours a week basic, and any overtime on
          > top of that is paid time and a half" (i.e. 1,5 x basic).
          >
          > This seems to be common enough usage on government sites:
          >
          > Overtime generally means any work over the basic working hours
          > included in your contract.
          >
          > http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Employment/Employees/WorkingHoursAndTimeOff/DG_10028439
          >
          > BR
          >
          > M.
          >
          > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Jirka Bolech <jirka.bolech@...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi all,
          > >
          > > Is there an expression in English to correspond with "fond" in Czech
          > to
          > > refer to a volume of working hours that is prescribed or expected
          > for
          > > most workers in accordance with regulations? It typically reflects
          > the
          > > legal volume of working hours minus national holidays and is often
          > > specified on a weekly, monthly, and annual basis. If this concept
          > > doesn't really work in English speaking countries, what descriptive
          > > translation could be easy to comprehend?
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Jirka Bolech
          > >
          > > _______________________________________________
          > > Czechlist mailing list
          > > Czechlist@...
          > > http://www.czechlist.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/czechlist
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Jirka Bolech
          Great thanks, Melvyn and Valerie, Basic working hours sound very good to me. I think this expression is as close as it possibly could. You probably don t
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 3, 2010
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            Great thanks, Melvyn and Valerie,

            "Basic working hours" sound very good to me. I think this expression is
            as close as it possibly could. You probably don't have the kind of thing
            as this: http://calendar.zoznam.sk/worktime-czcz.php. It's obviously a
            heritage of the 40 years of centrally controlled economy. When I was a
            lad, such calendars (dead tree copies thereof, of course) were quite
            popular as you could always check if you've worked enough hours in a
            particular month or which holidays fell on a weekend in a particular year.

            Have a nice Sunday evening...

            Jirka Bolech

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