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Re: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)

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  • Jennifer Hejtmankova
    No, blow in this case is indeed cocaine. 2) the whole 9 yards means basically every possible aspect of something - can also be used for things like events -
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 13 7:23 AM
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      No, blow in this case is indeed cocaine.

      2) "the whole 9 yards" means basically every possible aspect of something - can also be used for things like events - at the birthday party, they had cake, ice cream, balloons, the whole 9 yards.

      3) "Mike and Mike in the morning" - I do believe it refers to this:

      http://sports.espn.go.com/espnradio/show?showId=mikeandmike

      whch as you can see, is a former linebacker and a nerdy Jewish guy :-)

      4) can't help you with the ballsack (which refers to his scrotum, BTW) - must be something that they've discussed on the show and has become a kind of Mike and Mike meme....

      HTH,
      Jennifer


      On 13.7.2010, at 16:04, Alena Ryskov� 2e wrote:

      > FWIW, blow je or�l (Clinton - Lewinski)
      > Alena
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Pilucha, Jiri
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 3:55 PM
      > Subject: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)
      >
      > Can I please ask your help with the following
      >
      > 1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means cocaine?
      >
      > ...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...
      >
      > 2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a person:
      > ... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole nine yards.
      >
      > 3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?
      >
      > 4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and gives them the following advice:
      > If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
      > My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about
      >
      > Thanks a lot, Jiri
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Pilucha, Jiri
      Great help, Thanks to all J
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 13 7:30 AM
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        Great help, Thanks to all
        J
      • Matej Klimes
        Wasn t such a bad idea, Jamie (shame the context and grammar didn t work for it).. Husak and his disciples were advocating a saying that To become a
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 13 7:30 AM
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          Wasn't such a bad idea, Jamie (shame the context and grammar didn't
          work for it).. Husak and his disciples were advocating a saying that
          "To become a Czechoslovak president, you first have to be jailed" (as
          Husak was in the 50's).. I'm sure if this blow (job) idea caught on, it
          would become a perfect pick-up line for every upstart male politician
          in the US... :)

          M

          ------ Original Message ------
          From: "James Kirchner" <jpklists@...>
          To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: 13.7.2010 16:22:29
          Subject: Re: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)
          >Tady ale ne. Tady to urcite znamena kokain.
          >
          >Jamie
          >
          >On Jul 13, 2010, at 10:04 AM, Alena Rysková 2e wrote:
          >
          >>FWIW, blow je orál (Clinton - Lewinski)
          >>Alena
          >>
          >>----- Original Message -----
          >>From: Pilucha, Jiri
          >>To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          >>Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 3:55 PM
          >>Subject: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)
          >>
          >>Can I please ask your help with the following
          >>
          >>1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means
          >>cocaine?
          >>
          >>...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank
          >>but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...
          >>
          >>2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a
          >>person:
          >>... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole
          >>nine yards.
          >>
          >>3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?
          >>
          >>4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent
          >>assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and
          >>gives them the following advice:
          >>If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an
          >>ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's
          >>ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
          >>My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and
          >>what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about
          >>
          >>Thanks a lot, Jiri
          >>
          >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------
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        • Josef Hlavac
          Thanks a lot to all who contributed, especially to Jamie s detailed comments. I appreciate your help. Josef
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 13 8:06 AM
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            Thanks a lot to all who contributed, especially to Jamie's detailed
            comments. I appreciate your help.

            Josef

            James Kirchner wrote:
            > The systems among the countries are different, and as Valerie said, in the English-speaking countries we would be more likely to give the exams names that focus on their form, more than on their content.
            >
            > So you're not going to get equivalent terms without a good deal of distortion and misrepresentation.
            >
            > I'm all for making the terms as literal as possible, so that English speakers would understand what they are.
            >
            > For example, in my opinion "statni zaverecna zkouska" should be "state final examination", because as far as I know, its content and standards are to some degree set by the state. This distinction is important, because just a "degree examination" would not be so standardized, and the particular university or department would set the content and standards, making it as challenging or as Mickey Mouse as they want.
            >
            > "Obhajoba" would be "thesis defense", never just "defense", because it's not a martial arts exam or one on military tactics. But thank you for saying "thesis" and not "diploma work". :-)
            >
            > If the "odborna zkouska" is technical, then I agree with calling it a "technical examination". It does not sound like what you think it does, because the look-over that a mechanic gives a car is called a "technical INSPECTION", not a "technical examination".
            >
            > Your proposed translation of "odborna zkouska" also has a disadvantage in that it runs into the problem of "speciality" versus "specialty". It's hard to explain to Europeans how absolutely hilarious "speciality" sounds to North Americans, as opposed to "specialty". (And don't forget that we're two-thirds of the world's native speakers, so that means a lot of people will be laughing.) If you use "speciality" examination, your professors and legions of students will interact with the English-speaking world saying "spe-shee-a-li-ty", or even worse, "spe-see-a-li-ty", which will make them sound to two-thirds of us like circus ringmasters or funny chefs on cartoon shows. I am very serious about this. It's the kind of pronunciation that makes people look at the speaker and think, "Did he really say that?" and start listening to his language rather than what he's saying. So at all costs, do avoid that "speciality".
            >
            > Jamie
            >
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