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Sluzby Sklik a AdWords

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  • Prekladatelsky servis
    Zdravim vsechny, omlouvam se za dotaz, ktery tak uplne primo nesouvisi s preklady, ale nemate nekdo zkusenost, tzn. nepouzivate, sluzbu Sklik na Seznamu popr.
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 8, 2010
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      Zdravim vsechny,
      omlouvam se za dotaz, ktery tak uplne primo nesouvisi s preklady, ale nemate nekdo zkusenost, tzn. nepouzivate, sluzbu Sklik na Seznamu popr. AdWords na Google a, pokud ano, zaznamenali jste nejaky prinos z teto sluzby?

      Predem diky
      Iveta



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kostas
      Ja se celkem o tuto problematiku zajimam, ale prakticky mam vyzkouseny jen adwords. Zadne zazracne vysledky jsem s tim ale nedosahnul. Muj nazor je ten, ze aby
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 8, 2010
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        Ja se celkem o tuto problematiku zajimam, ale prakticky mam vyzkouseny jen adwords. Zadne zazracne vysledky jsem s tim ale nedosahnul. Muj nazor je ten, ze aby to fungovalo, clovek se tomu musi hodne venovat a musi tomu hodne rozumet. Neni to zadne "zadat si jen tak reklamu". Ale na druhe strane melo by to fungovat, protože treba adwords - to je vlastne uz dlouhodobe stezejni ne-li hlavni prijem Google.


        Jsou na to specializovane agentury, ktere to delaji nebo firmy si na to skoli vlastni lidi. Kdybych se do toho pustil sam, urcite bych si zaplatil skoleni, to se mi zda nejefektivnejsi. Kdo ma zde v tomto hodne renome, je Marek Prokop, lide si hodne chvali jeho skoleni. Ale zaklady bych se naucil sam z dostupnych zdroju a zaplatil bych si skoleni pro pokrocile, kde uci ruzne konkretni figle, jak tu reklamu delat efektivne, aby fungovala.

        K.



        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Prekladatelsky servis" <preklady@...> wrote:
        >
        > Zdravim vsechny,
        > omlouvam se za dotaz, ktery tak uplne primo nesouvisi s preklady, ale nemate nekdo zkusenost, tzn. nepouzivate, sluzbu Sklik na Seznamu popr. AdWords na Google a, pokud ano, zaznamenali jste nejaky prinos z teto sluzby?
        >
        > Predem diky
        > Iveta
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Josef Hlavac
        Hi all, I m trying to solve a terminology problem: At our school (FIT CVUT), the final examination ( statni zaverecna zkouska ), which anyone who wants to
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 10, 2010
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          Hi all,

          I'm trying to solve a terminology problem: At our school (FIT CVUT), the
          final examination ("statni zaverecna zkouska"), which anyone who wants
          to finish their studies and get the degree must pass, has two parts.
          First, the student presents and defends his/her thesis ("obhajoba"),
          then the students has to answer two questions asking about something
          from a pre-defined range of topics ("odborna zkouska").

          Now, how would you call these in English? So far, we've come up with:
          statni zaverecna zkouska = degree examination
          obhajoba = (thesis) defence
          odborna zkouska = speciality examination

          I am particularly unhappy with the "speciality examination" because it
          sounds like an examination that is focused on a very specific topic
          (which the "odborna zkouska" is not, as the topics cover pretty much the
          entire curriculum except for electives), and it may even sound like an
          optional exam that the student can take to get an extra piece of paper
          (e.g. all those Microsoft/Novell/Cisco/your-favorite-company
          certifications). The "official" dictionary of our school suggests
          "technical examination" which, IMHO, sounds like a car inspection by a
          mechanic. But maybe my instincts are wrong.

          Any thoughts or suggestions?

          Thanks,
          Josef
        • Valerie Talacko
          If it s a zaverecna zkouska, then I think it should include final - final examination, or final degree examination. Re. odborna - I think this is one of
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 10, 2010
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            If it's a zaverecna zkouska, then I think it should include "final" -
            final examination, or final degree examination.

            Re. odborna - I think this is one of those cases where "odborny" is more
            widely used in Czech than English. It's not a special subject exam, as
            you point out. If you want to keep some element of odborny in there, so
            that people realise that it corresponds to odborna zkouska in Czech,
            maybe specialist examination? After all, they are specialists in this
            field, even if the exam is a general one that covers the whole
            curriculum.

            I have a feeling that English would focus on the form of the exam - oral
            examination, or written examination. But that loses the correspondence
            with odborna zkouska.

            Valerie

            On Sat, 2010-07-10 at 10:21 +0200, Josef Hlavac wrote:
            >
            > Hi all,
            >
            > I'm trying to solve a terminology problem: At our school (FIT CVUT),
            > the
            > final examination ("statni zaverecna zkouska"), which anyone who
            > wants
            > to finish their studies and get the degree must pass, has two parts.
            > First, the student presents and defends his/her thesis ("obhajoba"),
            > then the students has to answer two questions asking about something
            > from a pre-defined range of topics ("odborna zkouska").
            >
            > Now, how would you call these in English? So far, we've come up with:
            > statni zaverecna zkouska = degree examination
            > obhajoba = (thesis) defence
            > odborna zkouska = speciality examination
            >
            > I am particularly unhappy with the "speciality examination" because
            > it
            > sounds like an examination that is focused on a very specific topic
            > (which the "odborna zkouska" is not, as the topics cover pretty much
            > the
            > entire curriculum except for electives), and it may even sound like
            > an
            > optional exam that the student can take to get an extra piece of
            > paper
            > (e.g. all those Microsoft/Novell/Cisco/your-favorite-company
            > certifications). The "official" dictionary of our school suggests
            > "technical examination" which, IMHO, sounds like a car inspection by
            > a
            > mechanic. But maybe my instincts are wrong.
            >
            > Any thoughts or suggestions?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Josef
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • zora.jackman
            Hi, I am not sure about the term defence - how about thesis presentation? And odborna zkouska could simply be an oral examinatin, as Valerie poited out. If
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 10, 2010
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              Hi,

              I am not sure about the term "defence" - how about thesis presentation?
              And odborna zkouska could simply be an oral examinatin, as Valerie poited out. If there is no other part of the exam I don't see the need to use any term for odborna, it just makes it confusing.

              Sometimes parts of exams are called "modules". You could then have thesis presentation module and specialist module of final degree examination. What do you think?

              ZORA

              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Talacko <valerie@...> wrote:
              >
              > If it's a zaverecna zkouska, then I think it should include "final" -
              > final examination, or final degree examination.
              >
              > Re. odborna - I think this is one of those cases where "odborny" is more
              > widely used in Czech than English. It's not a special subject exam, as
              > you point out. If you want to keep some element of odborny in there, so
              > that people realise that it corresponds to odborna zkouska in Czech,
              > maybe specialist examination? After all, they are specialists in this
              > field, even if the exam is a general one that covers the whole
              > curriculum.
              >
              > I have a feeling that English would focus on the form of the exam - oral
              > examination, or written examination. But that loses the correspondence
              > with odborna zkouska.
              >
              > Valerie
              >
              > On Sat, 2010-07-10 at 10:21 +0200, Josef Hlavac wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi all,
              > >
              > > I'm trying to solve a terminology problem: At our school (FIT CVUT),
              > > the
              > > final examination ("statni zaverecna zkouska"), which anyone who
              > > wants
              > > to finish their studies and get the degree must pass, has two parts.
              > > First, the student presents and defends his/her thesis ("obhajoba"),
              > > then the students has to answer two questions asking about something
              > > from a pre-defined range of topics ("odborna zkouska").
              > >
              > > Now, how would you call these in English? So far, we've come up with:
              > > statni zaverecna zkouska = degree examination
              > > obhajoba = (thesis) defence
              > > odborna zkouska = speciality examination
              > >
              > > I am particularly unhappy with the "speciality examination" because
              > > it
              > > sounds like an examination that is focused on a very specific topic
              > > (which the "odborna zkouska" is not, as the topics cover pretty much
              > > the
              > > entire curriculum except for electives), and it may even sound like
              > > an
              > > optional exam that the student can take to get an extra piece of
              > > paper
              > > (e.g. all those Microsoft/Novell/Cisco/your-favorite-company
              > > certifications). The "official" dictionary of our school suggests
              > > "technical examination" which, IMHO, sounds like a car inspection by
              > > a
              > > mechanic. But maybe my instincts are wrong.
              > >
              > > Any thoughts or suggestions?
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > > Josef
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
            • James Kirchner
              The systems among the countries are different, and as Valerie said, in the English-speaking countries we would be more likely to give the exams names that
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 10, 2010
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                The systems among the countries are different, and as Valerie said, in the English-speaking countries we would be more likely to give the exams names that focus on their form, more than on their content.

                So you're not going to get equivalent terms without a good deal of distortion and misrepresentation.

                I'm all for making the terms as literal as possible, so that English speakers would understand what they are.

                For example, in my opinion "statni zaverecna zkouska" should be "state final examination", because as far as I know, its content and standards are to some degree set by the state. This distinction is important, because just a "degree examination" would not be so standardized, and the particular university or department would set the content and standards, making it as challenging or as Mickey Mouse as they want.

                "Obhajoba" would be "thesis defense", never just "defense", because it's not a martial arts exam or one on military tactics. But thank you for saying "thesis" and not "diploma work". :-)

                If the "odborna zkouska" is technical, then I agree with calling it a "technical examination". It does not sound like what you think it does, because the look-over that a mechanic gives a car is called a "technical INSPECTION", not a "technical examination".

                Your proposed translation of "odborna zkouska" also has a disadvantage in that it runs into the problem of "speciality" versus "specialty". It's hard to explain to Europeans how absolutely hilarious "speciality" sounds to North Americans, as opposed to "specialty". (And don't forget that we're two-thirds of the world's native speakers, so that means a lot of people will be laughing.) If you use "speciality" examination, your professors and legions of students will interact with the English-speaking world saying "spe-shee-a-li-ty", or even worse, "spe-see-a-li-ty", which will make them sound to two-thirds of us like circus ringmasters or funny chefs on cartoon shows. I am very serious about this. It's the kind of pronunciation that makes people look at the speaker and think, "Did he really say that?" and start listening to his language rather than what he's saying. So at all costs, do avoid that "speciality".

                Jamie
              • James Kirchner
                Thesis presentation doesn t work unless the student really doesn t have to defend it. I ve never heard it called anything but a thesis defense, except when a
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 10, 2010
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                  "Thesis presentation" doesn't work unless the student really doesn't have to defend it.

                  I've never heard it called anything but a thesis defense, except when a student from Ukraine who never learned to pronounce "th" called it her "feces defense".

                  Jamie

                  On Jul 10, 2010, at 7:51 AM, zora.jackman wrote:

                  > Hi,
                  >
                  > I am not sure about the term "defence" - how about thesis presentation?
                  > And odborna zkouska could simply be an oral examinatin, as Valerie poited out. If there is no other part of the exam I don't see the need to use any term for odborna, it just makes it confusing.
                  >
                  > Sometimes parts of exams are called "modules". You could then have thesis presentation module and specialist module of final degree examination. What do you think?
                  >
                  > ZORA
                  >
                  > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Valerie Talacko <valerie@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > If it's a zaverecna zkouska, then I think it should include "final" -
                  > > final examination, or final degree examination.
                  > >
                  > > Re. odborna - I think this is one of those cases where "odborny" is more
                  > > widely used in Czech than English. It's not a special subject exam, as
                  > > you point out. If you want to keep some element of odborny in there, so
                  > > that people realise that it corresponds to odborna zkouska in Czech,
                  > > maybe specialist examination? After all, they are specialists in this
                  > > field, even if the exam is a general one that covers the whole
                  > > curriculum.
                  > >
                  > > I have a feeling that English would focus on the form of the exam - oral
                  > > examination, or written examination. But that loses the correspondence
                  > > with odborna zkouska.
                  > >
                  > > Valerie
                  > >
                  > > On Sat, 2010-07-10 at 10:21 +0200, Josef Hlavac wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Hi all,
                  > > >
                  > > > I'm trying to solve a terminology problem: At our school (FIT CVUT),
                  > > > the
                  > > > final examination ("statni zaverecna zkouska"), which anyone who
                  > > > wants
                  > > > to finish their studies and get the degree must pass, has two parts.
                  > > > First, the student presents and defends his/her thesis ("obhajoba"),
                  > > > then the students has to answer two questions asking about something
                  > > > from a pre-defined range of topics ("odborna zkouska").
                  > > >
                  > > > Now, how would you call these in English? So far, we've come up with:
                  > > > statni zaverecna zkouska = degree examination
                  > > > obhajoba = (thesis) defence
                  > > > odborna zkouska = speciality examination
                  > > >
                  > > > I am particularly unhappy with the "speciality examination" because
                  > > > it
                  > > > sounds like an examination that is focused on a very specific topic
                  > > > (which the "odborna zkouska" is not, as the topics cover pretty much
                  > > > the
                  > > > entire curriculum except for electives), and it may even sound like
                  > > > an
                  > > > optional exam that the student can take to get an extra piece of
                  > > > paper
                  > > > (e.g. all those Microsoft/Novell/Cisco/your-favorite-company
                  > > > certifications). The "official" dictionary of our school suggests
                  > > > "technical examination" which, IMHO, sounds like a car inspection by
                  > > > a
                  > > > mechanic. But maybe my instincts are wrong.
                  > > >
                  > > > Any thoughts or suggestions?
                  > > >
                  > > > Thanks,
                  > > > Josef
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Pilucha, Jiri
                  Can I please ask your help with the following 1) Am I right in assuming that blow in the context below means cocaine? ...every presidential candidate should
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                    Can I please ask your help with the following

                    1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means cocaine?

                    ...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...

                    2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a person:
                    ... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole nine yards.

                    3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?

                    4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and gives them the following advice:
                    If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
                    My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about


                    Thanks a lot, Jiri
                  • Alena Rysková 2e
                    FWIW, blow je orál (Clinton - Lewinski) Alena ... From: Pilucha, Jiri To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 3:55 PM Subject: [Czechlist]
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                      FWIW, blow je orál (Clinton - Lewinski)
                      Alena

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Pilucha, Jiri
                      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 3:55 PM
                      Subject: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)



                      Can I please ask your help with the following

                      1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means cocaine?

                      ...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...

                      2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a person:
                      ... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole nine yards.

                      3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?

                      4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and gives them the following advice:
                      If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
                      My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about

                      Thanks a lot, Jiri




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Pilucha, Jiri
                      I am not sure in this context... the Urban Dictionary offers cocaine as one of the options and I thought that it would fit in here much better (Besides, it
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                        I am not sure in this context... the Urban Dictionary offers cocaine as one of the options and I thought that it would fit in here much better
                        (Besides, it speaks of male presidential candidates, and if it were a blowjob, the male would be the recipient whereas this context seems to imply an active role

                        ________________________________
                        From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alena Ryskov� 2e
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 4:04 PM
                        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)



                        FWIW, blow je or�l (Clinton - Lewinski)
                        Alena

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Pilucha, Jiri
                        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 3:55 PM
                        Subject: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)

                        Can I please ask your help with the following

                        1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means cocaine?

                        ...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...

                        2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a person:
                        ... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole nine yards.

                        3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?

                        4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and gives them the following advice:
                        If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
                        My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about

                        Thanks a lot, Jiri

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • James Kirchner
                        ... Yes, blow here means cocaine. ... The whole nine yards means all of it , the whole enchilada , everything you could possibly expect. Nobody really
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                          On Jul 13, 2010, at 9:55 AM, Pilucha, Jiri wrote:

                          > Can I please ask your help with the following
                          >
                          > 1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means cocaine?
                          >
                          > ...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...

                          Yes, "blow" here means cocaine.

                          > 2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a person:
                          > ... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole nine yards.

                          "The whole nine yards" means "all of it", "the whole enchilada", everything you could possibly expect. Nobody really knows where this phrase came from, but it dates from the early 1960s.

                          > 3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?

                          Any radio show with two guys' names followed by "in the Morning" is a "drive time" (i.e., rush hour on the way to work) chat show with two hosts. This one is unusual, because it focuses on sports instead of obscenity. It's on ESPN radio, and you can see more about it here:

                          http://sports.espn.go.com/espnradio/show?showId=mikeandmike

                          ESPN is a 24-hour cable TV sports channel (actually they have several channels), and they also have at least one satellite radio station and syndicate programming to local broadcast stations.

                          > 4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and gives them the following advice:
                          > If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
                          > My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about

                          They are talking about any little nerdy Jewish guy. It's a stereotype. The ballsack here means the scrotum. What they mean is that you've got washed-up ex-football players (who probably only played in high school or college) or nerdy little Jewish intellectuals giving their opinions on things as insignificant as Brett Favre's scrotum. It means that people whose expertise on sports is nearly zero are giving their useless opinions on insignificant trivia tangentially related to sports. However, they are undoubtedly very passionate about such stupid, insignificant things.

                          Jamie
                        • James Kirchner
                          Tady ale ne. Tady to urcite znamena kokain. Jamie ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                            Tady ale ne. Tady to urcite znamena kokain.

                            Jamie

                            On Jul 13, 2010, at 10:04 AM, Alena Ryskov� 2e wrote:

                            > FWIW, blow je or�l (Clinton - Lewinski)
                            > Alena
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: Pilucha, Jiri
                            > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 3:55 PM
                            > Subject: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)
                            >
                            > Can I please ask your help with the following
                            >
                            > 1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means cocaine?
                            >
                            > ...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...
                            >
                            > 2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a person:
                            > ... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole nine yards.
                            >
                            > 3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?
                            >
                            > 4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and gives them the following advice:
                            > If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
                            > My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about
                            >
                            > Thanks a lot, Jiri
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Jennifer Hejtmankova
                            No, blow in this case is indeed cocaine. 2) the whole 9 yards means basically every possible aspect of something - can also be used for things like events -
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                              No, blow in this case is indeed cocaine.

                              2) "the whole 9 yards" means basically every possible aspect of something - can also be used for things like events - at the birthday party, they had cake, ice cream, balloons, the whole 9 yards.

                              3) "Mike and Mike in the morning" - I do believe it refers to this:

                              http://sports.espn.go.com/espnradio/show?showId=mikeandmike

                              whch as you can see, is a former linebacker and a nerdy Jewish guy :-)

                              4) can't help you with the ballsack (which refers to his scrotum, BTW) - must be something that they've discussed on the show and has become a kind of Mike and Mike meme....

                              HTH,
                              Jennifer


                              On 13.7.2010, at 16:04, Alena Ryskov� 2e wrote:

                              > FWIW, blow je or�l (Clinton - Lewinski)
                              > Alena
                              >
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > From: Pilucha, Jiri
                              > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 3:55 PM
                              > Subject: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)
                              >
                              > Can I please ask your help with the following
                              >
                              > 1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means cocaine?
                              >
                              > ...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...
                              >
                              > 2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a person:
                              > ... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole nine yards.
                              >
                              > 3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?
                              >
                              > 4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and gives them the following advice:
                              > If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
                              > My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about
                              >
                              > Thanks a lot, Jiri
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              >



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Pilucha, Jiri
                              Great help, Thanks to all J
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                                Great help, Thanks to all
                                J
                              • Matej Klimes
                                Wasn t such a bad idea, Jamie (shame the context and grammar didn t work for it).. Husak and his disciples were advocating a saying that To become a
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                                  Wasn't such a bad idea, Jamie (shame the context and grammar didn't
                                  work for it).. Husak and his disciples were advocating a saying that
                                  "To become a Czechoslovak president, you first have to be jailed" (as
                                  Husak was in the 50's).. I'm sure if this blow (job) idea caught on, it
                                  would become a perfect pick-up line for every upstart male politician
                                  in the US... :)

                                  M

                                  ------ Original Message ------
                                  From: "James Kirchner" <jpklists@...>
                                  To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: 13.7.2010 16:22:29
                                  Subject: Re: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)
                                  >Tady ale ne. Tady to urcite znamena kokain.
                                  >
                                  >Jamie
                                  >
                                  >On Jul 13, 2010, at 10:04 AM, Alena Rysková 2e wrote:
                                  >
                                  >>FWIW, blow je orál (Clinton - Lewinski)
                                  >>Alena
                                  >>
                                  >>----- Original Message -----
                                  >>From: Pilucha, Jiri
                                  >>To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                                  >>Sent: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 3:55 PM
                                  >>Subject: [Czechlist] a few Americanisms (presumably)
                                  >>
                                  >>Can I please ask your help with the following
                                  >>
                                  >>1) Am I right in assuming that "blow" in the context below means
                                  >>cocaine?
                                  >>
                                  >>...every presidential candidate should prove that they not only drank
                                  >>but smoked weed and tried blow and had casual sex while in college...
                                  >>
                                  >>2) What is "the whole nine yards" in the following description of a
                                  >>person:
                                  >>... full beard, long hair, flannel shirt, scabby hands, the whole
                                  >>nine yards.
                                  >>
                                  >>3) What kind of a radio show is "Mike and Mike in the Morning"?
                                  >>
                                  >>4) Relating to the above, the author speaks of quote unquote ardent
                                  >>assholes calling in whenever Mike and Mike take cellphone calls, and
                                  >>gives them the following advice:
                                  >>If you really cannot drive to work without finding out what an
                                  >>ex-lineman and a nerdy little Jewish guy think about Brett Favre's
                                  >>ballsack, drive off the highway and into a lake.
                                  >>My question is, what nerdy little Jewish guy he is taking about and
                                  >>what's this stuff about Brett Favre's ballsack about
                                  >>
                                  >>Thanks a lot, Jiri
                                  >>
                                  >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >------------------------------------
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • Josef Hlavac
                                  Thanks a lot to all who contributed, especially to Jamie s detailed comments. I appreciate your help. Josef
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jul 13, 2010
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                                    Thanks a lot to all who contributed, especially to Jamie's detailed
                                    comments. I appreciate your help.

                                    Josef

                                    James Kirchner wrote:
                                    > The systems among the countries are different, and as Valerie said, in the English-speaking countries we would be more likely to give the exams names that focus on their form, more than on their content.
                                    >
                                    > So you're not going to get equivalent terms without a good deal of distortion and misrepresentation.
                                    >
                                    > I'm all for making the terms as literal as possible, so that English speakers would understand what they are.
                                    >
                                    > For example, in my opinion "statni zaverecna zkouska" should be "state final examination", because as far as I know, its content and standards are to some degree set by the state. This distinction is important, because just a "degree examination" would not be so standardized, and the particular university or department would set the content and standards, making it as challenging or as Mickey Mouse as they want.
                                    >
                                    > "Obhajoba" would be "thesis defense", never just "defense", because it's not a martial arts exam or one on military tactics. But thank you for saying "thesis" and not "diploma work". :-)
                                    >
                                    > If the "odborna zkouska" is technical, then I agree with calling it a "technical examination". It does not sound like what you think it does, because the look-over that a mechanic gives a car is called a "technical INSPECTION", not a "technical examination".
                                    >
                                    > Your proposed translation of "odborna zkouska" also has a disadvantage in that it runs into the problem of "speciality" versus "specialty". It's hard to explain to Europeans how absolutely hilarious "speciality" sounds to North Americans, as opposed to "specialty". (And don't forget that we're two-thirds of the world's native speakers, so that means a lot of people will be laughing.) If you use "speciality" examination, your professors and legions of students will interact with the English-speaking world saying "spe-shee-a-li-ty", or even worse, "spe-see-a-li-ty", which will make them sound to two-thirds of us like circus ringmasters or funny chefs on cartoon shows. I am very serious about this. It's the kind of pronunciation that makes people look at the speaker and think, "Did he really say that?" and start listening to his language rather than what he's saying. So at all costs, do avoid that "speciality".
                                    >
                                    > Jamie
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ------------------------------------
                                    >
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                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
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