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TERM: na zelene louce

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Hi, Are there any suggestions how to nicely express build something na zelene louce (zelene ) , referring to the fact that a construction takes place on an
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 3, 2000
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      Hi,

      Are there any suggestions how to nicely express 'build something "na zelene
      louce" (zelene')', referring to the fact that a construction takes place on
      an undeveloped piece of land?

      Jirka Bolech

      By the way, thanks, Simon, for the summary on "listina zakladnich lidskych
      prav".
    • Simon Vaughan
      ... zelene ... on ... Hi Jirka, In Britain this would be called development on a green-field site (the opposite being a brown-field site -- land that has
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 3, 2000
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        > Are there any suggestions how to nicely express 'build something "na
        zelene
        > louce" (zelene')', referring to the fact that a construction takes place
        on
        > an undeveloped piece of land?

        Hi Jirka,
        In Britain this would be called development on a "green-field site" (the
        opposite being a "brown-field site" -- land that has previously been built
        on). We also have "green-belt land", which is usually a strip of land
        around a city that has been set aside to remain undeveloped (usually only
        until the local council changes its mind when a lucrative enough proposal
        comes along). However, Simon tells me that his former boss (an American)
        didn't like "green-field site", so it's possible that they use a different
        phrase in the States. Any offers, anyone?

        Hope this helps,
        Rachel
      • Melvyn Clarke
        ... na ... place ... American) ... different ... Hullo, Here s a variation on the same theme: http://www.case.org.uk/press/bw0298.htm. Greenfield developments
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 3, 2000
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          --- In Czechlist@egroups.com, "Simon Vaughan" <rachelandsimon@v...>
          wrote:
          > > Are there any suggestions how to nicely express 'build something
          "na
          > zelene
          > > louce" (zelene')', referring to the fact that a construction takes
          place
          > on
          > > an undeveloped piece of land?
          >

          Rachel wrote:
          >Simon tells me that his former boss (an
          American)
          > didn't like "green-field site", so it's possible that they use a
          different
          > phrase in the States. Any offers, anyone?
          >
          > Hope this helps,
          > Rachel

          Hullo,

          Here's a variation on the same theme:

          http://www.case.org.uk/press/bw0298.htm.


          Greenfield developments

          A major policy statement on planning, made by Government in January,
          has been widely condemned by environmental groups. This
          followed controversial decisions by the Environment Secretary to allow
          substantial greenfield developments outside Newcastle
          and in rural Hertfordshire, plus an instruction overturning the
          department's own inspectors report and forcing an extra 12,800 houses
          to he accommodated by the West Sussex Structure Plan. The CPRE has
          called for a radical reform of the planning process. The
          Government has subsequently suggested that a greenfield-development
          tax may he introduced. Tory politicians from the rural
          shires are also pressing for a greater emphasis to be placed on
          brownfield housing sites. The debate is sure to hot up over the
          spring.

          ----------
          Talking of building, I'd be interested to hear your preferences
          as regards "zastavena plocha" (the dictionaries say 'built-up area'
          which sounds OK to me for a whole district but perhaps some
          alternative exists for individual structures?) and "uzitna plocha"
          ("usable area" seems to be standard).

          Enjoy your Sunday lunch,

          Melvyn
        • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
          ... I think you ve just said it yourself. That it was built on undeveloped land. There s not really a nice way to say it, because nowadays Anglophonians think
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 3, 2000
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            In a message dated 12/3/00 4:29:40 AM, jirka.bolech@... writes:

            >Are there any suggestions how to nicely express 'build something "na zelene
            >louce" (zelene')', referring to the fact that a construction takes place
            >on an undeveloped piece of land?

            I think you've just said it yourself. That it was built on undeveloped land.
            There's not really a nice way to say it, because nowadays Anglophonians
            think that building on undeveloped land is not nice.

            If someone is trying to create an atmosphere, or is trying to be poetic, I
            think you could just translate it literally, and say it was built on a green
            meadow.

            Jamie
          • Michal Ginter
            A green field investment. The Czech term is a translation of an English term. M.
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 3, 2000
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              A green field investment. The Czech term is a translation of an English
              term.
              M.

              >
              >Hi,
              >
              >Are there any suggestions how to nicely express 'build something "na zelene
              >louce" (zelene')', referring to the fact that a construction takes place on
              >an undeveloped piece of land?
              >
              >Jirka Bolech
              >
              >
            • Michael Grant
              ... To build a facility on a greenfield site To build a greenfield facility/development/plant Michael -- BLUE DANUBE international communication services The
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 3, 2000
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                >Are there any suggestions how to nicely express 'build something "na zelene
                >louce" (zelene')', referring to the fact that a construction takes place on
                >an undeveloped piece of land?

                To build a facility on a greenfield site
                To build a greenfield facility/development/plant

                Michael

                --
                BLUE DANUBE international communication services
                The Central and East European Language Source!
                <http://www.bdanube.com>, <mailto:bdanube@...>
                Tel. (+1-512) 336-8911, Fax (+1-512) 336-8954
              • Michael Grant
                ... The only thing about it that this American doesn t like is the hyphen. Michael -- BLUE DANUBE international communication services The Central and East
                Message 7 of 9 , Dec 3, 2000
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                  >However, Simon tells me that his former boss (an American)
                  >didn't like "green-field site", so it's possible that they use a different
                  >phrase in the States.

                  The only thing about it that this American doesn't like is the hyphen.
                  Michael

                  --
                  BLUE DANUBE international communication services
                  The Central and East European Language Source!
                  <http://www.bdanube.com>, <mailto:bdanube@...>
                  Tel. (+1-512) 336-8911, Fax (+1-512) 336-8954
                • Simon Vaughan
                  ... different ... It was the whole caboodle that my former boss didn t like: he thought it was Czenglish (whereas, according to Michal, the Czech expression is
                  Message 8 of 9 , Dec 3, 2000
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                    > >However, Simon tells me that his former boss (an American)
                    > >didn't like "green-field site", so it's possible that they use a
                    different
                    > >phrase in the States.
                    >
                    > The only thing about it that this American doesn't like is the hyphen.
                    > Michael

                    It was the whole caboodle that my former boss didn't like: he thought it was
                    Czenglish (whereas, according to Michal, the Czech expression is actually a
                    translation of the English).

                    I don't see any grammatical justification for writing "greenfield" rather
                    than "green-field", though I accept that it is widely used. It's not as if
                    it's a noun in its own right, like blackbird: it's only ever used in
                    attributive position.

                    Simon
                  • Simon Vollam
                    ... I had to deal with this one when translating all the guff about the (in)famous reconstruction of the CNB building. In the end, I opted for area covered
                    Message 9 of 9 , Dec 4, 2000
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                      > Talking of building, I'd be interested to hear your preferences
                      > as regards "zastavena plocha" (the dictionaries say 'built-up area'
                      > which sounds OK to me for a whole district but perhaps some
                      > alternative exists for individual structures?) and "uzitna plocha"
                      > ("usable area" seems to be standard).
                      >

                      I had to deal with this one when translating all the guff about the
                      (in)famous reconstruction of the CNB building. In the end, I opted
                      for "area covered (by the reconstruction)". And for "obestaveny
                      prostor" I used "volume enclosed". If anyone has any better ideas,
                      though, I'd also be glad to hear them.

                      Simon
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