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RE: [Czechlist] "mimo ESSK"

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Should be ekonimcky spjate skupiny klientu in this context:
    Message 1 of 17 , Feb 6, 2010
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      Should be "ekonimcky spjate skupiny klientu" in this context:
      <http://www.cnb.cz/cs/dohled_fin_trh/dnft_zpravy/download/dnft_2006_cz.pdf>
      http://www.cnb.cz/cs/dohled_fin_trh/dnft_zpravy/download/dnft_2006_cz.pdf

      Not sure of an English equivalent or the exact meaning though...

      Jirka Bolech


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    • James Kirchner
      Thanks, Iveta and Jirka. I have no idea what the whole thing could mean, but it sounds to me as if it indicates clients outside the company s group , i.e.,
      Message 2 of 17 , Feb 6, 2010
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        Thanks, Iveta and Jirka.

        I have no idea what the whole thing could mean, but it sounds to me as if it indicates clients outside the company's "group", i.e., outside the conglomerate. That would mean what we call "internal clients".

        Jamie

        On Feb 6, 2010, at 3:51 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

        > Should be "ekonimcky spjate skupiny klientu" in this context:
        > <http://www.cnb.cz/cs/dohled_fin_trh/dnft_zpravy/download/dnft_2006_cz.pdf>
        > http://www.cnb.cz/cs/dohled_fin_trh/dnft_zpravy/download/dnft_2006_cz.pdf
        >
        > Not sure of an English equivalent or the exact meaning though...
        >
        > Jirka Bolech
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



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      • Jirka Bolech
        I conclude they are simply what the expression says: clients (of a bank) that are economically linked (with each other). I guess banks use this expression in
        Message 3 of 17 , Feb 6, 2010
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          I conclude they are simply what the expression says: clients (of a bank)
          that are economically linked (with each other). I guess banks use this
          expression in strategic marketing management in making their evaluation
          methods efficient.

          Jirka Bolech



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jirka Bolech
          You interpretation, Jamie, sounds plausible and logical within your sentence. Especially if the company is part of a group of companies. Sorry for the typo -
          Message 4 of 17 , Feb 6, 2010
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            You interpretation, Jamie, sounds plausible and logical within your
            sentence. Especially if the company is part of a group of companies.

            Sorry for the typo -> "ekonomicky... ".

            Jirka Bolech
          • James Kirchner
            In this case, the client company is supposed to present the bank with a list of receivables from customers other than this ESSK, so it sounds to me as if they
            Message 5 of 17 , Feb 6, 2010
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              In this case, the client company is supposed to present the bank with a list of receivables from customers other than this ESSK, so it sounds to me as if they are not to list receivables from their own internal clients, i.e., divisions of their own parent company.

              At least it seems that way to me.

              Jamie

              On Feb 6, 2010, at 3:59 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

              > I conclude they are simply what the expression says: clients (of a bank)
              > that are economically linked (with each other). I guess banks use this
              > expression in strategic marketing management in making their evaluation
              > methods efficient.
              >
              > Jirka Bolech
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >



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            • Pavel
              I ve found this one: group of connected clients http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P6-TA-2009-0367+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN For the
              Message 6 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                I've found this one:
                group of connected clients
                http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P6-TA-2009-0367+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN
                For the Czech version, just replace "EN" with "CS" at the end of the link.

                Maybe this will help.
                Pavel

                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                >
                > In this case, the client company is supposed to present the bank with a list of receivables from customers other than this ESSK, so it sounds to me as if they are not to list receivables from their own internal clients, i.e., divisions of their own parent company.
                >
                > At least it seems that way to me.
                >
                > Jamie
                >
                > On Feb 6, 2010, at 3:59 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:
                >
                > > I conclude they are simply what the expression says: clients (of a bank)
                > > that are economically linked (with each other). I guess banks use this
                > > expression in strategic marketing management in making their evaluation
                > > methods efficient.
                > >
                > > Jirka Bolech
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • James Kirchner
                Thanks, Pavel. The problem for translation into English, in practical terms, is determining what kind of connection they re talking about. Vendors are always
                Message 7 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                  Thanks, Pavel.

                  The problem for translation into English, in practical terms, is determining what kind of connection they're talking about. Vendors are always economically connected to their clients, so if ESSK simply means clients connected to the vendor, then it means any client at all. It must mean "internal clients", meaning clients that are under the same corporate umbrella in some way. That's the only way I can think of for it to make any sense.

                  Jamie

                  On Feb 7, 2010, at 9:00 AM, Pavel wrote:

                  > I've found this one:
                  > group of connected clients
                  > http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P6-TA-2009-0367+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN
                  > For the Czech version, just replace "EN" with "CS" at the end of the link.
                  >
                  > Maybe this will help.
                  > Pavel
                  >
                  > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > In this case, the client company is supposed to present the bank with a list of receivables from customers other than this ESSK, so it sounds to me as if they are not to list receivables from their own internal clients, i.e., divisions of their own parent company.
                  > >
                  > > At least it seems that way to me.
                  > >
                  > > Jamie
                  > >
                  > > On Feb 6, 2010, at 3:59 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > I conclude they are simply what the expression says: clients (of a bank)
                  > > > that are economically linked (with each other). I guess banks use this
                  > > > expression in strategic marketing management in making their evaluation
                  > > > methods efficient.
                  > > >
                  > > > Jirka Bolech
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Pavel
                  It seems to be an established term, though: www.fsa.gov.uk/pubs/international/bank_recap.pdf Or: Group of connected clients means two or more persons,
                  Message 8 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                    It seems to be an established term, though:
                    www.fsa.gov.uk/pubs/international/bank_recap.pdf
                    Or:
                    "Group of connected clients" means two or more persons, whether natural or legal, holding exposures from the same credit institution and any of its subsidiaries, whether on a joint or separate basis, but who are mutually associated through the control of one of them by the other. Moreover, the interconnection between the persons also implies that their cumulated exposure actually represents a single risk to the credit institution, with the likelihood that if one of them experiences financial problems the other or all of them are likely to encounter repayment difficulties."

                    Maybe this will help you even more :-))

                    Pavel

                    --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks, Pavel.
                    >
                    > The problem for translation into English, in practical terms, is determining what kind of connection they're talking about. Vendors are always economically connected to their clients, so if ESSK simply means clients connected to the vendor, then it means any client at all. It must mean "internal clients", meaning clients that are under the same corporate umbrella in some way. That's the only way I can think of for it to make any sense.
                    >
                    > Jamie
                    >
                    > On Feb 7, 2010, at 9:00 AM, Pavel wrote:
                    >
                    > > I've found this one:
                    > > group of connected clients
                    > > http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P6-TA-2009-0367+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN
                    > > For the Czech version, just replace "EN" with "CS" at the end of the link.
                    > >
                    > > Maybe this will help.
                    > > Pavel
                    > >
                    > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > In this case, the client company is supposed to present the bank with a list of receivables from customers other than this ESSK, so it sounds to me as if they are not to list receivables from their own internal clients, i.e., divisions of their own parent company.
                    > > >
                    > > > At least it seems that way to me.
                    > > >
                    > > > Jamie
                    > > >
                    > > > On Feb 6, 2010, at 3:59 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > > I conclude they are simply what the expression says: clients (of a bank)
                    > > > > that are economically linked (with each other). I guess banks use this
                    > > > > expression in strategic marketing management in making their evaluation
                    > > > > methods efficient.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Jirka Bolech
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • James Kirchner
                    It may be an established term in Brusselese, but my US client is unlikely to understand it or know where to find it. As I mentioned, in the context I have to
                    Message 9 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                      It may be an established term in Brusselese, but my US client is unlikely to understand it or know where to find it. As I mentioned, in the context I have to deal with, the clients are "mutually associated through control of one of them by the other", as I correctly guessed. These would be known in transparent English, in the context I am facing, as "internal customers".

                      Jamie

                      On Feb 7, 2010, at 10:07 AM, Pavel wrote:

                      > It seems to be an established term, though:
                      > www.fsa.gov.uk/pubs/international/bank_recap.pdf
                      > Or:
                      > "Group of connected clients" means two or more persons, whether natural or legal, holding exposures from the same credit institution and any of its subsidiaries, whether on a joint or separate basis, but who are mutually associated through the control of one of them by the other. Moreover, the interconnection between the persons also implies that their cumulated exposure actually represents a single risk to the credit institution, with the likelihood that if one of them experiences financial problems the other or all of them are likely to encounter repayment difficulties."
                      >
                      > Maybe this will help you even more :-))
                      >
                      > Pavel
                      >
                      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Thanks, Pavel.
                      > >
                      > > The problem for translation into English, in practical terms, is determining what kind of connection they're talking about. Vendors are always economically connected to their clients, so if ESSK simply means clients connected to the vendor, then it means any client at all. It must mean "internal clients", meaning clients that are under the same corporate umbrella in some way. That's the only way I can think of for it to make any sense.
                      > >
                      > > Jamie
                      > >
                      > > On Feb 7, 2010, at 9:00 AM, Pavel wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > I've found this one:
                      > > > group of connected clients
                      > > > http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P6-TA-2009-0367+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN
                      > > > For the Czech version, just replace "EN" with "CS" at the end of the link.
                      > > >
                      > > > Maybe this will help.
                      > > > Pavel
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > In this case, the client company is supposed to present the bank with a list of receivables from customers other than this ESSK, so it sounds to me as if they are not to list receivables from their own internal clients, i.e., divisions of their own parent company.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > At least it seems that way to me.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Jamie
                      > > > >
                      > > > > On Feb 6, 2010, at 3:59 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > > I conclude they are simply what the expression says: clients (of a bank)
                      > > > > > that are economically linked (with each other). I guess banks use this
                      > > > > > expression in strategic marketing management in making their evaluation
                      > > > > > methods efficient.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Jirka Bolech
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                      >



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Pavel
                      OK, thank you for your explanation. I ll add the term to my glossary. Pavel
                      Message 10 of 17 , Feb 7, 2010
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                        OK, thank you for your explanation. I'll add the term to my glossary.

                        Pavel



                        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > It may be an established term in Brusselese, but my US client is unlikely to understand it or know where to find it. As I mentioned, in the context I have to deal with, the clients are "mutually associated through control of one of them by the other", as I correctly guessed. These would be known in transparent English, in the context I am facing, as "internal customers".
                        >
                        > Jamie
                        >
                        > On Feb 7, 2010, at 10:07 AM, Pavel wrote:
                        >
                        > > It seems to be an established term, though:
                        > > www.fsa.gov.uk/pubs/international/bank_recap.pdf
                        > > Or:
                        > > "Group of connected clients" means two or more persons, whether natural or legal, holding exposures from the same credit institution and any of its subsidiaries, whether on a joint or separate basis, but who are mutually associated through the control of one of them by the other. Moreover, the interconnection between the persons also implies that their cumulated exposure actually represents a single risk to the credit institution, with the likelihood that if one of them experiences financial problems the other or all of them are likely to encounter repayment difficulties."
                        > >
                        > > Maybe this will help you even more :-))
                        > >
                        > > Pavel
                        > >
                        > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Thanks, Pavel.
                        > > >
                        > > > The problem for translation into English, in practical terms, is determining what kind of connection they're talking about. Vendors are always economically connected to their clients, so if ESSK simply means clients connected to the vendor, then it means any client at all. It must mean "internal clients", meaning clients that are under the same corporate umbrella in some way. That's the only way I can think of for it to make any sense.
                        > > >
                        > > > Jamie
                        > > >
                        > > > On Feb 7, 2010, at 9:00 AM, Pavel wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > > I've found this one:
                        > > > > group of connected clients
                        > > > > http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P6-TA-2009-0367+0+DOC+XML+V0//EN
                        > > > > For the Czech version, just replace "EN" with "CS" at the end of the link.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Maybe this will help.
                        > > > > Pavel
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@> wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > In this case, the client company is supposed to present the bank with a list of receivables from customers other than this ESSK, so it sounds to me as if they are not to list receivables from their own internal clients, i.e., divisions of their own parent company.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > At least it seems that way to me.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Jamie
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > On Feb 6, 2010, at 3:59 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > > I conclude they are simply what the expression says: clients (of a bank)
                        > > > > > > that are economically linked (with each other). I guess banks use this
                        > > > > > > expression in strategic marketing management in making their evaluation
                        > > > > > > methods efficient.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Jirka Bolech
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > >
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