Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Czechlist] Re: èisté obchodní jmìní

Expand Messages
  • Tomás Skøont
    Hello Sarka, I do not if my comments are of any use, but my Internet connection failed today.However, back to your problem. Zakladni jmeni neni to same co
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 29, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Sarka,
      I do not if my comments are of any use, but my Internet connection failed
      today.However, back to your problem.

      Zakladni jmeni neni to same co vlastni jmeni. Ciste obchodni jmeni = hodnota
      spolecnosti pocitana jako celkova aktiva minus celkova pasiva; ekvivalent
      kmenovych akcii spolecnosti. Takze "owner's equity" je spravne, stejne jako
      "net worth", coz bych asi v tomto pripade zvolil, protoze obsahuje preklad
      ceskeho "ciste".

      Doufam v brzke shledani U Buvola

      Tomas Skront

      > --- In Czechlist@egroups.com, ruck@r... wrote:
      > > Hello, I suppose someone has already come over the term "ciste
      > > obchodni jmeni". Does that correspond to any of "zakladni jmeni"
      > > or "vlastni jmeni", or is it completely different? And how do you
      > > folks translate that into English?
      > >
      > > Urgent!
      > >
      > > Thanks, Sarka
      >
      > Oh dear, the muddy waters of accounting. If only they would harmonise
      > the Czech rules with International Accounting Standards, we could all
      > live happily ever after. Maybe.
      >
      > Most of my reference books give "ciste obchodni jmeni" as "net
      > assets", i.e. total assets minus (current) liabilities. Other
      > equivalent English terms include "net worth", "owners' equity",
      > "shareholder's equity" (UK) and "stockholders' equity" (US). Which I
      > think should make it the same as "vlastni jmeni" (although I'm not
      > too familiar with Czech accounting law).
      >
      > There are two problems here. One is that it is difficult finding
      > direct equivalents, owing to differences between the legal
      > definitions of such terms in different countries. And the other is
      > that in the business world (according to Christopher Nobes in "The
      > Economist Pocket Accountant") "capital" and "equity" are used
      > somewhat loosely in English and the exact meaning often has to be
      > divined from the context.
      >
      > All of which is probably of little help to you. Sorry!
      >
      > Simon
      >
      >
      >
      > Check out the Czechlist opinion polls:
      >
      > http://www.egroups.com/polls/Czechlist
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.