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Re: [Czechlist] swine vs pig

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  • Charlie Stanford
    I think part of the reason is that swine is an old-fashioned term for pigs and swine influenza dates back to 1918. Also swine is used here as a generic - as
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 28, 2009
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      I think part of the reason is that swine is an old-fashioned term for pigs and swine influenza dates back to 1918. Also swine is used here as a generic - as you would talk about TB in cattle rather than TB in cows.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: James Kirchner
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 10:14 AM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] swine vs pig


      "Swine" sounds more official, more negative and more "adjectivey" than
      "pig" does.

      Jamie

      On Oct 28, 2009, at 5:05 AM, Petr wrote:

      > Zaujalo mne, ze v lekarskych textech je normalne "pig" mnohem
      > beznejsi nez "swine" (pig liver, pig kidney), kdezto u soucasne
      > mexicke chripky se ujalo "swine flu" mnohem vic nez "pig flu".
      > Zajimalo by mne, jestli to ma nejaky racionalni duvod, nebo to
      > proste jenom tak je.
      > Petr Adamek
      >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Petr
      Dekuji za obe odpovedi. Petr
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 28, 2009
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        Dekuji za obe odpovedi. Petr
        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie Stanford" <charliestanfordtranslations@...> wrote:
        >
        > I think part of the reason is that swine is an old-fashioned term for pigs and swine influenza dates back to 1918. Also swine is used here as a generic - as you would talk about TB in cattle rather than TB in cows.
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: James Kirchner
        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 10:14 AM
        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] swine vs pig
        >
        >
        > "Swine" sounds more official, more negative and more "adjectivey" than
        > "pig" does.
        >
        > Jamie
        >
        > On Oct 28, 2009, at 5:05 AM, Petr wrote:
        >
        > > Zaujalo mne, ze v lekarskych textech je normalne "pig" mnohem
        > > beznejsi nez "swine" (pig liver, pig kidney), kdezto u soucasne
        > > mexicke chripky se ujalo "swine flu" mnohem vic nez "pig flu".
        > > Zajimalo by mne, jestli to ma nejaky racionalni duvod, nebo to
        > > proste jenom tak je.
        > > Petr Adamek
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Jsem chráněn bezplatným SPAMfighter pro soukromé uživatele.
        > Až doposud mě ušetřil příjmu 1536 spam-emailů.
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        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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