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Help: Dovolena na zotavenou

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  • coilinoc
    Hi there, I m doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a section on Dovolena na zotavenou . Fronek translates this as convalescent leave and
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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      Hi there,

      I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply talks about normal vacations/holidays...

      Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking about a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so hard that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds very weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section "Holidays", but I don't know why would they would describe it so specifcially in these terms.

      Your thoughts would be welcome
      Best regards
      Coilin
    • Alena Rysková 2e
      I have seen this in several contracts and yes, they did mean common holidays. Alena ... From: coilinoc To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, August 06,
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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        I have seen this in several contracts and yes, they did mean common holidays.
        Alena

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: coilinoc
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, August 06, 2009 11:12 AM
        Subject: [Czechlist] Help: Dovolena na zotavenou


        Hi there,

        I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply talks about normal vacations/holidays...

        Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking about a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so hard that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds very weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section "Holidays", but I don't know why would they would describe it so specifcially in these terms.

        Your thoughts would be welcome
        Best regards
        Coilin





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • melvyn.geo
        I see it is sometimes translated as annual leave , in contrast to additional leave , maternal leave , parental leave etc.
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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          I see it is sometimes translated as "annual leave", in contrast to "additional leave", "maternal leave", "parental leave" etc.

          http://eur-lex.europa.eu/Notice.do?mode=dbl&lang=cs&ihmlang=cs&lng1=cs,en&lng2=cs,da,de,el,en,es,et,fi,fr,hu,it,lt,lv,mt,nl,pl,pt,sk,sl,sv,&val=389829:cs&page=

          http://is.muni.cz/th/45675/pravf_d/?lang=en

          http://em.kbbarko.cz/c.php?a=75

          BR

          M.


          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Alena Rysková 2e <preklady@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have seen this in several contracts and yes, they did mean common holidays.
          > Alena
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: coilinoc
          > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Thursday, August 06, 2009 11:12 AM
          > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: Dovolena na zotavenou
          >
          >
          > Hi there,
          >
          > I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply talks about normal vacations/holidays...
          >
          > Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking about a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so hard that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds very weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section "Holidays", but I don't know why would they would describe it so specifcially in these terms.
          >
          > Your thoughts would be welcome
          > Best regards
          > Coilin
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Ing. Jiri Klima
          Ja bych to prelozil pouze jako Dovolena - Holidays. Myslim, ze puvodni zamer tohoto nazvu byl, ze behem dovolene si ma clovek odpocinout a zotavit se. Lidi ale
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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            Ja bych to prelozil pouze jako Dovolena - Holidays. Myslim, ze puvodni zamer
            tohoto nazvu byl, ze behem dovolene si ma clovek odpocinout a zotavit se.
            Lidi ale casto pracovali na opravach svych domku nebo si privydelavali jinou
            praci. Tim padem se behem dovolene nemohli "zotavit". Proste to je blbost a
            pozustatek komunistick�ho omezovani.

            Jirka



            _____

            From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of coilinoc
            Sent: Thursday, August 06, 2009 11:13 AM
            To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Czechlist] Help: Dovolena na zotavenou





            Hi there,

            I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a section on
            "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as "convalescent leave" and
            I have found a lot of hits for "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the
            relevant section simply talks about normal vacations/holidays...

            Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking about a
            standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so hard that they
            need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds very weird to my ears...
            I'm tempted to just call the section "Holidays", but I don't know why would
            they would describe it so specifcially in these terms.

            Your thoughts would be welcome
            Best regards
            Coilin





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Valerie Talacko
            Yes, I think annual leave is the technical term of choice, and seems to be used worldwide (as opposed to holiday/vacation). And it corresponds to dovolena na
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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              Yes, I think annual leave is the technical term of choice, and seems to
              be used worldwide (as opposed to holiday/vacation). And it corresponds
              to dovolena na zotavenou in that it's the ordinary leave you get every
              year as opposed to leave in special circumstances.

              (However, I find it odd when people use "annual leave" in conversation
              -"I'm on annual leave next week").

              Valerie


              On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 09:44 +0000, melvyn.geo wrote:
              >
              > I see it is sometimes translated as "annual leave", in contrast to
              > "additional leave", "maternal leave", "parental leave" etc.
              >
              > http://eur-lex.europa.eu/Notice.do?mode=dbl&lang=cs&ihmlang=cs&lng1=cs,en&lng2=cs,da,de,el,en,es,et,fi,fr,hu,it,lt,lv,mt,nl,pl,pt,sk,sl,sv,&val=389829:cs&page=
              >
              > http://is.muni.cz/th/45675/pravf_d/?lang=en
              >
              > http://em.kbbarko.cz/c.php?a=75
              >
              > BR
              >
              > M.
              >
              > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Alena Rysková 2e <preklady@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > I have seen this in several contracts and yes, they did mean common
              > holidays.
              > > Alena
              > >
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > From: coilinoc
              > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Thursday, August 06, 2009 11:12 AM
              > > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: Dovolena na zotavenou
              > >
              > >
              > > Hi there,
              > >
              > > I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a
              > section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as
              > "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for "recuperative
              > leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply talks about normal
              > vacations/holidays...
              > >
              > > Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking about
              > a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so hard
              > that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds very
              > weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section "Holidays",
              > but I don't know why would they would describe it so specifcially in
              > these terms.
              > >
              > > Your thoughts would be welcome
              > > Best regards
              > > Coilin
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • James Kirchner
              To me recuperative leave sounds like what we in the US call sick leave , so it would certainly not be a term you should use to mean an ordinary vacation, in
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                To me "recuperative leave" sounds like what we in the US call "sick
                leave", so it would certainly not be a term you should use to mean an
                ordinary vacation, in my opinion.

                Now, here's the big mystery to me: If the British would call the
                vacation in such a contract "holidays", what do they call the actual
                holidays? In my American contracts, we were given the right to paid
                vacation, and several paid holidays, such as Christmas, Labor Day, and
                a few flexible "personal holidays" that Jews could use for Passover,
                Muslims could use for Eid, blacks could use for Martin Luther King
                day, or anybody could just use on any day they wanted. How do you
                handle this if you don't distinguish linguistically between dovolena
                and svatky?

                Jamie

                On Aug 6, 2009, at 5:12 AM, coilinoc wrote:

                > Hi there,
                >
                > I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a
                > section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as
                > "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for
                > "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply talks
                > about normal vacations/holidays...
                >
                > Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking about
                > a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so hard
                > that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds very
                > weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section "Holidays",
                > but I don't know why would they would describe it so specifcially in
                > these terms.
                >
                > Your thoughts would be welcome
                > Best regards
                > Coilin
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Valerie Talacko
                The former would be called public holidays, the latter I m not sure - personal holidays sounds reasonable to me. However, the linguistic distinction is that
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                  The former would be called public holidays, the latter I'm not sure
                  - personal holidays sounds reasonable to me.

                  However, the linguistic distinction is that the annual leave-type
                  holiday is holiday in the singular, so holiday = dovolena, holidays =
                  svatky. (I know people talk informally about having had nice holidays,
                  but you would say "I have x weeks of paid holiday" (or x weeks of annual
                  leave).

                  Valerie


                  On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
                  >
                  > To me "recuperative leave" sounds like what we in the US call "sick
                  > leave", so it would certainly not be a term you should use to mean an
                  > ordinary vacation, in my opinion.
                  >
                  > Now, here's the big mystery to me: If the British would call the
                  > vacation in such a contract "holidays", what do they call the actual
                  > holidays? In my American contracts, we were given the right to paid
                  > vacation, and several paid holidays, such as Christmas, Labor Day,
                  > and
                  > a few flexible "personal holidays" that Jews could use for Passover,
                  > Muslims could use for Eid, blacks could use for Martin Luther King
                  > day, or anybody could just use on any day they wanted. How do you
                  > handle this if you don't distinguish linguistically between dovolena
                  > and svatky?
                  >
                  > Jamie
                  >
                  > On Aug 6, 2009, at 5:12 AM, coilinoc wrote:
                  >
                  > > Hi there,
                  > >
                  > > I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a
                  > > section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as
                  > > "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for
                  > > "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply
                  > talks
                  > > about normal vacations/holidays...
                  > >
                  > > Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking
                  > about
                  > > a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so
                  > hard
                  > > that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds very
                  > > weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section
                  > "Holidays",
                  > > but I don't know why would they would describe it so specifcially
                  > in
                  > > these terms.
                  > >
                  > > Your thoughts would be welcome
                  > > Best regards
                  > > Coilin
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Valerie Talacko
                  p.s. school holidays are in the plural, though.
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                    p.s. school holidays are in the plural, though.

                    On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 15:51 +0200, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                    >
                    > The former would be called public holidays, the latter I'm not sure
                    > - personal holidays sounds reasonable to me.
                    >
                    > However, the linguistic distinction is that the annual leave-type
                    > holiday is holiday in the singular, so holiday = dovolena, holidays =
                    > svatky. (I know people talk informally about having had nice holidays,
                    > but you would say "I have x weeks of paid holiday" (or x weeks of
                    > annual
                    > leave).
                    >
                    > Valerie
                    >
                    > On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
                    > >
                    > > To me "recuperative leave" sounds like what we in the US call "sick
                    > > leave", so it would certainly not be a term you should use to mean
                    > an
                    > > ordinary vacation, in my opinion.
                    > >
                    > > Now, here's the big mystery to me: If the British would call the
                    > > vacation in such a contract "holidays", what do they call the
                    > actual
                    > > holidays? In my American contracts, we were given the right to paid
                    > > vacation, and several paid holidays, such as Christmas, Labor Day,
                    > > and
                    > > a few flexible "personal holidays" that Jews could use for
                    > Passover,
                    > > Muslims could use for Eid, blacks could use for Martin Luther King
                    > > day, or anybody could just use on any day they wanted. How do you
                    > > handle this if you don't distinguish linguistically between
                    > dovolena
                    > > and svatky?
                    > >
                    > > Jamie
                    > >
                    > > On Aug 6, 2009, at 5:12 AM, coilinoc wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > Hi there,
                    > > >
                    > > > I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a
                    > > > section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as
                    > > > "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for
                    > > > "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply
                    > > talks
                    > > > about normal vacations/holidays...
                    > > >
                    > > > Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking
                    > > about
                    > > > a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so
                    > > hard
                    > > > that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds
                    > very
                    > > > weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section
                    > > "Holidays",
                    > > > but I don't know why would they would describe it so specifcially
                    > > in
                    > > > these terms.
                    > > >
                    > > > Your thoughts would be welcome
                    > > > Best regards
                    > > > Coilin
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • James Kirchner
                    So you have to add an adjective when you have a holiday coming up, such as a personal or religious holiday? Jamie ... [Non-text portions of this message have
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                      So you have to add an adjective when you have a holiday coming up,
                      such as a personal or religious holiday?

                      Jamie

                      On Aug 6, 2009, at 9:54 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:

                      >
                      > p.s. school holidays are in the plural, though.
                      >
                      > On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 15:51 +0200, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                      > >
                      > > The former would be called public holidays, the latter I'm not sure
                      > > - personal holidays sounds reasonable to me.
                      > >
                      > > However, the linguistic distinction is that the annual leave-type
                      > > holiday is holiday in the singular, so holiday = dovolena,
                      > holidays =
                      > > svatky. (I know people talk informally about having had nice
                      > holidays,
                      > > but you would say "I have x weeks of paid holiday" (or x weeks of
                      > > annual
                      > > leave).
                      > >
                      > > Valerie
                      > >
                      > > On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > To me "recuperative leave" sounds like what we in the US call
                      > "sick
                      > > > leave", so it would certainly not be a term you should use to mean
                      > > an
                      > > > ordinary vacation, in my opinion.
                      > > >
                      > > > Now, here's the big mystery to me: If the British would call the
                      > > > vacation in such a contract "holidays", what do they call the
                      > > actual
                      > > > holidays? In my American contracts, we were given the right to
                      > paid
                      > > > vacation, and several paid holidays, such as Christmas, Labor Day,
                      > > > and
                      > > > a few flexible "personal holidays" that Jews could use for
                      > > Passover,
                      > > > Muslims could use for Eid, blacks could use for Martin Luther King
                      > > > day, or anybody could just use on any day they wanted. How do you
                      > > > handle this if you don't distinguish linguistically between
                      > > dovolena
                      > > > and svatky?
                      > > >
                      > > > Jamie
                      > > >
                      > > > On Aug 6, 2009, at 5:12 AM, coilinoc wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > > Hi there,
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a
                      > > > > section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as
                      > > > > "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for
                      > > > > "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply
                      > > > talks
                      > > > > about normal vacations/holidays...
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking
                      > > > about
                      > > > > a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work so
                      > > > hard
                      > > > > that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds
                      > > very
                      > > > > weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section
                      > > > "Holidays",
                      > > > > but I don't know why would they would describe it so
                      > specifcially
                      > > > in
                      > > > > these terms.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Your thoughts would be welcome
                      > > > > Best regards
                      > > > > Coilin
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Valerie Talacko
                      I have a holiday coming up = I m going on holiday soon. There s a holiday coming up = there s a (public, religious etc.) holiday soon. ... I go on several
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                        "I have a holiday coming up" = I'm going on holiday soon.

                        "There's a holiday coming up" = there's a (public, religious etc.)
                        holiday soon.

                        -----------------------

                        I go on several holidays a year, because I have six weeks' paid holiday.

                        I've taken holiday tomorrow, because it's a Muslim holiday.

                        &c.

                        I can't think of an occasion on which I've ever come across any
                        confusion...



                        On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 10:06 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
                        >
                        > So you have to add an adjective when you have a holiday coming up,
                        > such as a personal or religious holiday?
                        >
                        > Jamie
                        >
                        > On Aug 6, 2009, at 9:54 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                        >
                        > >
                        > > p.s. school holidays are in the plural, though.
                        > >
                        > > On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 15:51 +0200, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > The former would be called public holidays, the latter I'm not
                        > sure
                        > > > - personal holidays sounds reasonable to me.
                        > > >
                        > > > However, the linguistic distinction is that the annual leave-type
                        > > > holiday is holiday in the singular, so holiday = dovolena,
                        > > holidays =
                        > > > svatky. (I know people talk informally about having had nice
                        > > holidays,
                        > > > but you would say "I have x weeks of paid holiday" (or x weeks of
                        > > > annual
                        > > > leave).
                        > > >
                        > > > Valerie
                        > > >
                        > > > On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > To me "recuperative leave" sounds like what we in the US call
                        > > "sick
                        > > > > leave", so it would certainly not be a term you should use to
                        > mean
                        > > > an
                        > > > > ordinary vacation, in my opinion.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Now, here's the big mystery to me: If the British would call the
                        > > > > vacation in such a contract "holidays", what do they call the
                        > > > actual
                        > > > > holidays? In my American contracts, we were given the right to
                        > > paid
                        > > > > vacation, and several paid holidays, such as Christmas, Labor
                        > Day,
                        > > > > and
                        > > > > a few flexible "personal holidays" that Jews could use for
                        > > > Passover,
                        > > > > Muslims could use for Eid, blacks could use for Martin Luther
                        > King
                        > > > > day, or anybody could just use on any day they wanted. How do
                        > you
                        > > > > handle this if you don't distinguish linguistically between
                        > > > dovolena
                        > > > > and svatky?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Jamie
                        > > > >
                        > > > > On Aug 6, 2009, at 5:12 AM, coilinoc wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > > Hi there,
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is a
                        > > > > > section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this as
                        > > > > > "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for
                        > > > > > "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section simply
                        > > > > talks
                        > > > > > about normal vacations/holidays...
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Is it possible to use this expression when you're just talking
                        > > > > about
                        > > > > > a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work
                        > so
                        > > > > hard
                        > > > > > that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it sounds
                        > > > very
                        > > > > > weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section
                        > > > > "Holidays",
                        > > > > > but I don't know why would they would describe it so
                        > > specifcially
                        > > > > in
                        > > > > > these terms.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Your thoughts would be welcome
                        > > > > > Best regards
                        > > > > > Coilin
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • melvyn.geo
                        ... I think we will often add an adjective if there is any need for clarity. Good Friday might well be referred to as a religious holiday. Can t say I recall
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > So you have to add an adjective when you have a holiday coming up,
                          > such as a personal or religious holiday?

                          I think we will often add an adjective if there is any need for clarity. Good Friday might well be referred to as a religious holiday. Can't say I recall anybody in Britain referring to a "personal holiday" if they were staying away from work to celebrate some religious, historical or cultural event, but then I see no reason why anybody shouldn't. We'd probably just say something like "I'm taking a day off/a day of annual leave for Diwali" or whatever.

                          If you work on a public holiday then you are normally given a "day in lieu" (sometimes deliberately mis*pronounced "day in loo").

                          Public holidays are often referred to (inaccurately in some cases) as bank holidays in Britain - nothing to do with the Bank Holiday declared in the USA during the Depression. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_holidays

                          HTH

                          M.
                          *Or quite correctly pronounced in some places, to be sure.
                        • Valerie Talacko
                          or rather I m taking holiday tomorrow. (Or, more casually, I m taking tomorrow off. ) I still suggest using annual leave for holiday/dovolena na zotavenou
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                            or rather "I'm taking holiday tomorrow." (Or, more casually, "I'm taking
                            tomorrow off.")

                            I still suggest using "annual leave" for holiday/dovolena na zotavenou
                            in a formal context, though.


                            On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 16:46 +0200, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                            >
                            > "I have a holiday coming up" = I'm going on holiday soon.
                            >
                            > "There's a holiday coming up" = there's a (public, religious etc.)
                            > holiday soon.
                            >
                            > -----------------------
                            >
                            > I go on several holidays a year, because I have six weeks' paid
                            > holiday.
                            >
                            > I've taken holiday tomorrow, because it's a Muslim holiday.
                            >
                            > &c.
                            >
                            > I can't think of an occasion on which I've ever come across any
                            > confusion...
                            >
                            > On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 10:06 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
                            > >
                            > > So you have to add an adjective when you have a holiday coming up,
                            > > such as a personal or religious holiday?
                            > >
                            > > Jamie
                            > >
                            > > On Aug 6, 2009, at 9:54 AM, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                            > >
                            > > >
                            > > > p.s. school holidays are in the plural, though.
                            > > >
                            > > > On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 15:51 +0200, Valerie Talacko wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > The former would be called public holidays, the latter I'm not
                            > > sure
                            > > > > - personal holidays sounds reasonable to me.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > However, the linguistic distinction is that the annual
                            > leave-type
                            > > > > holiday is holiday in the singular, so holiday = dovolena,
                            > > > holidays =
                            > > > > svatky. (I know people talk informally about having had nice
                            > > > holidays,
                            > > > > but you would say "I have x weeks of paid holiday" (or x weeks
                            > of
                            > > > > annual
                            > > > > leave).
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Valerie
                            > > > >
                            > > > > On Thu, 2009-08-06 at 07:58 -0400, James Kirchner wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > To me "recuperative leave" sounds like what we in the US call
                            > > > "sick
                            > > > > > leave", so it would certainly not be a term you should use to
                            > > mean
                            > > > > an
                            > > > > > ordinary vacation, in my opinion.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Now, here's the big mystery to me: If the British would call
                            > the
                            > > > > > vacation in such a contract "holidays", what do they call the
                            > > > > actual
                            > > > > > holidays? In my American contracts, we were given the right
                            > to
                            > > > paid
                            > > > > > vacation, and several paid holidays, such as Christmas, Labor
                            > > Day,
                            > > > > > and
                            > > > > > a few flexible "personal holidays" that Jews could use for
                            > > > > Passover,
                            > > > > > Muslims could use for Eid, blacks could use for Martin Luther
                            > > King
                            > > > > > day, or anybody could just use on any day they wanted. How do
                            > > you
                            > > > > > handle this if you don't distinguish linguistically between
                            > > > > dovolena
                            > > > > > and svatky?
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Jamie
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > On Aug 6, 2009, at 5:12 AM, coilinoc wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Hi there,
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > I'm doing an employment contract at the moment, and there is
                            > a
                            > > > > > > section on "Dovolena na zotavenou". Fronek translates this
                            > as
                            > > > > > > "convalescent leave" and I have found a lot of hits for
                            > > > > > > "recuperative leave". Nonetheless, the relevant section
                            > simply
                            > > > > > talks
                            > > > > > > about normal vacations/holidays...
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Is it possible to use this expression when you're just
                            > talking
                            > > > > > about
                            > > > > > > a standard vacation allowance? I know some people might work
                            > > so
                            > > > > > hard
                            > > > > > > that they need to recuperate on their holidays, but it
                            > sounds
                            > > > > very
                            > > > > > > weird to my ears... I'm tempted to just call the section
                            > > > > > "Holidays",
                            > > > > > > but I don't know why would they would describe it so
                            > > > specifcially
                            > > > > > in
                            > > > > > > these terms.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Your thoughts would be welcome
                            > > > > > > Best regards
                            > > > > > > Coilin
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          • James Kirchner
                            ... We nearly always pronounce lieu as loo , but it causes no confusion, because we don t go to the loo. I d hate to be a guy named Lou in Britain. ... In
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                              On Aug 6, 2009, at 10:54 AM, melvyn.geo wrote:

                              > If you work on a public holiday then you are normally given a "day
                              > in lieu" (sometimes deliberately mis*pronounced "day in loo").

                              We nearly always pronounce "lieu" as "loo", but it causes no
                              confusion, because we don't go to the loo. I'd hate to be a guy named
                              Lou in Britain.

                              > Public holidays are often referred to (inaccurately in some cases)
                              > as bank holidays in Britain - nothing to do with the Bank Holiday
                              > declared in the USA during the Depression.

                              In the US, bank holidays are a type of government holiday that only
                              bank and government employees have off. While the rest of us labor,
                              bankers and government employees take off on Columbus Day, Presidents'
                              Day, M.L. King Day, and a host of others.

                              Jamie




                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • melvyn.geo
                              ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skip_to_My_Lou One presumes Americans called John often have difficult childhoods too. Or imagine living here:
                              Message 14 of 14 , Aug 6, 2009
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                                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                                > I'd hate to be a guy named Lou in Britain.

                                :-) In Britain you only call your son Lou if you want him to grow up hard:

                                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skip_to_My_Lou

                                One presumes Americans called John often have difficult childhoods too.

                                Or imagine living here:
                                http://www.looe.org/

                                BR

                                M.
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