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Professor as title

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  • Jennifer Hejtmankova
    Hi all, I m translating some biographies, and one gentleman is a professor at a university in Japan. The Czech text refers to him throughout as Professor X
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 1, 2009
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      Hi all,

      I'm translating some biographies, and one gentleman is a professor at
      a university in Japan. The Czech text refers to him throughout as
      "Professor X" - I might be overthinking this, but is it normal to use
      the same in English? "Professor X has taught at the uni for 11 years"
      "Professor X recently completed a Japanese translation of blahblah"
      It sounds like Czechlish to me, and need the advice of others....I
      have been changing it to "Mr" throughout, but I don't want to cause
      any offense!

      TIA,
      Jennifer

      (needs to buy a style guide or strucna mluvnice for English - was in
      the US last week, but couldn't decide on one - any suggestions? Jamie?)
    • James Kirchner
      Yes, in English we do use Professor as a title in something like that, but not again and again, as the Czechs do. It would go like this: On the first
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 1, 2009
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        Yes, in English we do use "Professor" as a title in something like
        that, but not again and again, as the Czechs do. It would go like this:

        On the first mention (usually if the paragraph begins with his name)
        we'd give only his first name and surname, usually followed by the
        abbreviation of his academic credential, such as PhD or PsyD. After
        that, we would call him "Professor X" one or two times in the
        paragraph. The rest of the time we would just use either his surname,
        or if the tone is friendlier, his first name.

        Jamie

        On Aug 1, 2009, at 11:22 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:

        > Hi all,
        >
        > I'm translating some biographies, and one gentleman is a professor at
        > a university in Japan. The Czech text refers to him throughout as
        > "Professor X" - I might be overthinking this, but is it normal to use
        > the same in English? "Professor X has taught at the uni for 11 years"
        > "Professor X recently completed a Japanese translation of blahblah"
        > It sounds like Czechlish to me, and need the advice of others....I
        > have been changing it to "Mr" throughout, but I don't want to cause
        > any offense!
        >
        > TIA,
        > Jennifer
        >
        > (needs to buy a style guide or strucna mluvnice for English - was in
        > the US last week, but couldn't decide on one - any suggestions?
        > Jamie?)
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Trittipo
        ... As to the title question, Jamie s suggestions about use would apply in many articles. Here s an example using surnames only (with status as professor
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 2, 2009
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          Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:
          > I'm translating some biographies, and one gentleman is a professor at
          > a university in Japan. The Czech text refers to him throughout as
          > "Professor X" - I might be overthinking this, but is it normal to use
          > the same in English? "Professor X has taught at the uni for 11 years"
          > . . .
          > (needs to buy a style guide or strucna mluvnice for English - was in
          > the US last week, but couldn't decide on one - any suggestions? Jamie?)
          >


          As to the title question, Jamie's suggestions about use would apply in
          many articles. Here's an example using surnames only (with status as
          professor indicated in a parenthetical or otherwise):
          http://news.columbia.edu/oncampus/1615 and here's another:
          http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=106415885 and yet
          two more:
          http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Choosing-Civility-in-a-Rude-Culture.html
          and http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/atm-photo-find.html .

          But obviously it may vary from publication to publication. As it
          happens, the New York Times seems to use the title all the time, to
          judge from these two examples:
          http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/09/business/09stra.html and
          http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/02/technology/02WIRE.html . I wondered
          whether that might be a newspaper-vs-magazine division, but another
          newspaper
          (http://www.startribune.com/templates/Print_This_Story?sid=30568724 )
          uses a style more like the Smithsonian or the Columbia magazine.

          As for style guides, I don't think one often goes wrong with the Chicago
          Manual of Style on the U.S. side of the Atlantic. I dislike the
          Associated Press guide myself. I don't have personal experience with
          the Oxford or Cambridge guides from the U.K.

          I shan't wade into the issue of grammars as opposed to style guides.
        • James Kirchner
          The best US style guide -- which no one ever discusses or demands -- is The Gregg Reference Manual. The Chicago Manual of Style and some others leave a lot of
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 2, 2009
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            The best US style guide -- which no one ever discusses or demands --
            is The Gregg Reference Manual. The Chicago Manual of Style and some
            others leave a lot of questions unanswered, but in years of editing at
            publishers and advertising agencies, I have never seen anyone come up
            with an issue that the Gregg manual didn't resolve.

            I don't think the AP guide is of much use either. In my opinion, one
            is best working with the Gregg manual and a pair of good dictionaries.

            Jamie

            On Aug 2, 2009, at 3:12 PM, Michael Trittipo wrote:

            > As for style guides, I don't think one often goes wrong with the
            > Chicago
            > Manual of Style on the U.S. side of the Atlantic. I dislike the
            > Associated Press guide myself. I don't have personal experience with
            > the Oxford or Cambridge guides from the U.K.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jennifer Hejtmankova
            Thanks Jamie, I ll look into it! Thanks, too, Michael, for your input. Jen ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 2, 2009
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              Thanks Jamie, I'll look into it!

              Thanks, too, Michael, for your input.

              Jen

              On 2.8.2009, at 21:58, James Kirchner wrote:

              > The best US style guide -- which no one ever discusses or demands --
              > is The Gregg Reference Manual. The Chicago Manual of Style and some
              > others leave a lot of questions unanswered, but in years of editing at
              > publishers and advertising agencies, I have never seen anyone come up
              > with an issue that the Gregg manual didn't resolve.
              >
              > I don't think the AP guide is of much use either. In my opinion, one
              > is best working with the Gregg manual and a pair of good dictionaries.
              >
              > Jamie
              >
              > On Aug 2, 2009, at 3:12 PM, Michael Trittipo wrote:
              >
              > > As for style guides, I don't think one often goes wrong with the
              > > Chicago
              > > Manual of Style on the U.S. side of the Atlantic. I dislike the
              > > Associated Press guide myself. I don't have personal experience with
              > > the Oxford or Cambridge guides from the U.K.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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