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Re: TERM: statni jazykova zkouska

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  • kzgafas
    I think I will obbey what you two are saying and go with State Language (Proficiency) Exam. Although that state - i still can t get accustomed to it. Maybe I
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 28, 2009
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      I think I will obbey what you two are saying and go with State Language (Proficiency) Exam. Although that "state" - i still can't get accustomed to it. Maybe I am just too used to "governmental" or "national" as adjectives in similar cases, although they do not fit here.

      Thank you,

      K.



      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have one, and in English I call it a "state language proficiency
      > exam". If you're not in the United States, "state" is assumed to mean
      > the central government.
      >
      > If you use "government" it may sound as if the exam were administered
      > for a job with the government.
      >
      > The thing that sounds really scary -- worse than "government" -- is
      > "decree", but that's Europe, and there's nothing you can do about
      > that. :-)
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Jul 28, 2009, at 3:42 PM, kzgafas wrote:
      >
      > > Can you please help me with a respect evoking translation of the
      > > above into English? State Language Exam does not sound very good to
      > > me. Governmental Language Exam is too strong. For more context:
      > > statni jazykova zkouska is based on the decree of Department of
      > > Education, Youth and Sports of the CR.
      > >
      > > Thank you,
      > >
      > > K.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • kzgafas
      I think I will obbey what you two are saying and go with State Language (Proficiency) Exam. Although that state - i still can t get accustomed to it. Maybe I
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 28, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I think I will obbey what you two are saying and go with State Language (Proficiency) Exam. Although that "state" - i still can't get accustomed to it. Maybe I am just too used to "governmental" or "national" as adjectives in similar cases, although they do not fit here.

        Thank you,

        K.



        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have one, and in English I call it a "state language proficiency
        > exam". If you're not in the United States, "state" is assumed to mean
        > the central government.
        >
        > If you use "government" it may sound as if the exam were administered
        > for a job with the government.
        >
        > The thing that sounds really scary -- worse than "government" -- is
        > "decree", but that's Europe, and there's nothing you can do about
        > that. :-)
        >
        > Jamie
        >
        > On Jul 28, 2009, at 3:42 PM, kzgafas wrote:
        >
        > > Can you please help me with a respect evoking translation of the
        > > above into English? State Language Exam does not sound very good to
        > > me. Governmental Language Exam is too strong. For more context:
        > > statni jazykova zkouska is based on the decree of Department of
        > > Education, Youth and Sports of the CR.
        > >
        > > Thank you,
        > >
        > > K.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • James Kirchner
        Governmental implies that the test is being taken for the government s purposes, such as government employment, or government tracking of student
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 28, 2009
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          "Governmental" implies that the test is being taken for the
          government's purposes, such as government employment, or government
          tracking of student achievement, etc.

          "National" won't really work, because many things are called
          "national" that are not associated with or endorsed by the state. The
          National Hockey League not only has nothing to do with the government,
          it even includes teams from two separate nations. In the US we have
          the National Day of Prayer, which has no official connection to the
          government at all, not to mention magazines such as the National
          Review and National Geographic.

          The only thing left is "state".

          Jamie

          On Jul 28, 2009, at 8:43 PM, kzgafas wrote:

          > I think I will obbey what you two are saying and go with State
          > Language (Proficiency) Exam. Although that "state" - i still can't
          > get accustomed to it. Maybe I am just too used to "governmental" or
          > "national" as adjectives in similar cases, although they do not fit
          > here.
          >
          > Thank you,
          >
          > K.
          >
          > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I have one, and in English I call it a "state language proficiency
          > > exam". If you're not in the United States, "state" is assumed to
          > mean
          > > the central government.
          > >
          > > If you use "government" it may sound as if the exam were
          > administered
          > > for a job with the government.
          > >
          > > The thing that sounds really scary -- worse than "government" -- is
          > > "decree", but that's Europe, and there's nothing you can do about
          > > that. :-)
          > >
          > > Jamie
          > >
          > > On Jul 28, 2009, at 3:42 PM, kzgafas wrote:
          > >
          > > > Can you please help me with a respect evoking translation of the
          > > > above into English? State Language Exam does not sound very good
          > to
          > > > me. Governmental Language Exam is too strong. For more context:
          > > > statni jazykova zkouska is based on the decree of Department of
          > > > Education, Youth and Sports of the CR.
          > > >
          > > > Thank you,
          > > >
          > > > K.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • kzgafas
          Or, since the state exam I talk about was passed in 1989 before the split of the CR, it might be also translated: Federal Language Examination :-) KZ
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 29, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Or, since the state exam I talk about was passed in 1989 before the split of the CR, it might be also translated: Federal Language Examination :-)

            KZ


            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
            >
            > "Governmental" implies that the test is being taken for the
            > government's purposes, such as government employment, or government
            > tracking of student achievement, etc.
            >
            > "National" won't really work, because many things are called
            > "national" that are not associated with or endorsed by the state. The
            > National Hockey League not only has nothing to do with the government,
            > it even includes teams from two separate nations. In the US we have
            > the National Day of Prayer, which has no official connection to the
            > government at all, not to mention magazines such as the National
            > Review and National Geographic.
            >
            > The only thing left is "state".
            >
            > Jamie
            >
            > On Jul 28, 2009, at 8:43 PM, kzgafas wrote:
            >
            > > I think I will obbey what you two are saying and go with State
            > > Language (Proficiency) Exam. Although that "state" - i still can't
            > > get accustomed to it. Maybe I am just too used to "governmental" or
            > > "national" as adjectives in similar cases, although they do not fit
            > > here.
            > >
            > > Thank you,
            > >
            > > K.
            > >
            > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I have one, and in English I call it a "state language proficiency
            > > > exam". If you're not in the United States, "state" is assumed to
            > > mean
            > > > the central government.
            > > >
            > > > If you use "government" it may sound as if the exam were
            > > administered
            > > > for a job with the government.
            > > >
            > > > The thing that sounds really scary -- worse than "government" -- is
            > > > "decree", but that's Europe, and there's nothing you can do about
            > > > that. :-)
            > > >
            > > > Jamie
            > > >
            > > > On Jul 28, 2009, at 3:42 PM, kzgafas wrote:
            > > >
            > > > > Can you please help me with a respect evoking translation of the
            > > > > above into English? State Language Exam does not sound very good
            > > to
            > > > > me. Governmental Language Exam is too strong. For more context:
            > > > > statni jazykova zkouska is based on the decree of Department of
            > > > > Education, Youth and Sports of the CR.
            > > > >
            > > > > Thank you,
            > > > >
            > > > > K.
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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