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Re: [Czechlist] Re: Slovak term: pravny poriadok Slovenskej republiky

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  • Gerald Turner
    Thanks Valerie, Mike, Matej and anyone I ve forgotten. Gerry ... -- Czech-In Translations V lesíčku 5 150 00 Prague 5 Czech Republic Tel/fax: ++ 420 235 357
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 25, 2009
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      Thanks Valerie, Mike, Matej and anyone I've forgotten.

      Gerry

      On 25/03/2009, Valerie Talacko <valerie@...> wrote:
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      > I'd go for 'transposed into Slovak law.' I think the legal system is the
      > *system*, but the law is the body of law, if you see what I mean....
      >
      > Valerie
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Michael Trittipo
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 4:13 AM
      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: Slovak term: pravny poriadok Slovenskej
      > republiky
      >
      > I'm coming late to the party (after 12 hours of network updates).
      > Maybe you don't need more ideas. But I think it sounds less stuffy as
      > "legal system," and there could be reasons not to use "legislation" or
      > "legal code." One reason against "legislation" is the possibility
      > otherwise of sentences saying things like "this legislation will
      > transpose directive X into legislation." Ouch: clearly the first use of
      > the word "legislation" doesn't mean the same thing as the second. As
      > for "legal code," even countries with strong "statutes are all"
      > traditions recognize that "doctrine" or "precedent" is part of the system.
      >
      > So I'd suggest "legal system." In English, that has far less of the
      > "Ordnung -- und you vill be happy vit it!" feeling of "order." Or go
      > the other way, and simplify: "transposed and implemented into Slovak
      > law." There, "law" is understood not as _necessarily_ legislation, but
      > as the overally system. Common phrases in English (real, not Brussels)
      > are "transposed into national law" or "transposed into domestic law," or
      > the like. (So says a NON-Euro lawyer, from his west-of-the-pond vantage
      > point. based mainly on reading about goings-on east of the pond.) HTH.
      >
      > grabanrad wrote:
      > > How about "jurisprudence" or "system of laws"?
      > >
      > >> ----- Original Message -----
      > >> From: Gerald Turner
      > >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > >> Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 10:54 AM
      > >> . . .
      > >> The issue of integrated pollution prevention and control is dealt
      > >> with by the Council Directive 96/61/EC that has been transposed and
      > >> implemented into the Slovak Republic legal order by means of the Act
      > >> No. 245/2003 Coll. . . .
      > >>
      > >> > ... encountered this in official EU documents translated as
      > >> > [SK] Republic legal order". Surely it simply means "legislation" or
      > >> > "legal code".
      > >>
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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