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Re: Recruiting and culture

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  • kzgafas
    So this only confirms that they do it for some kind of advantage. They do it voluntarily, but they are not volunteers. We all do many things voluntarily, but
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 10, 2009
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      So this only confirms that they do it for some kind of advantage. They do it voluntarily, but they are not volunteers. We all do many things voluntarily, but "to volunteer" is something more specific.

      K.


      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
      >
      > Realize too that most US soldiers don't have a long-term career
      > commitment. Most of them stay for two years, and some stay for five
      > years, if they are given an education in the military.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Mar 10, 2009, at 12:40 PM, kzgafas wrote:
      >
      > > To do st. "voluntarily" has a different established meaning from to
      > > "volunteer". A professional soldier, who "voluntarily" accepts to
      > > serve in a professional army for a real wage and as a long-term
      > > carrier commitment, is not a "volunteer" who usually devotes his
      > > spare time to some cause for free or for a symbolic wage.
      > >
      > > However, I do not believe it is realistic to create an illusion of
      > > "professional armies serving to their own nations" just by
      > > associating the term "professional army" to "volunteers".:-) It is
      > > the way as it should be, of course, but it does not seem to be so.
      > > And many people realize this.
      > >
      > > K.
      > >
      > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > When there was still a draft, the soldiers were paid, housed,
      > > educated
      > > > and given social benefits just as they are now. The only difference
      > > > was that at that time, when Uncle Sam called you, you had no choice
      > > > but to either go get the haircut, or run to Canada or Sweden never
      > > to
      > > > return.
      > > >
      > > > Now no one is forced in to the military. Everyone volunteers.
      > > >
      > > > So in both cases, in terms of pay, length of service, education and
      > > > benefits, the army was "professional". Before, most of them were
      > > > forced into the profession. Now they volunteer for the profession.
      > > >
      > > > Jamie
      > > >
      > > > On Mar 9, 2009, at 10:24 PM, kzgafas wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > I think I do not understand your point. The US army (the active
      > > one,
      > > > > not reserves) is professional, isn't it? So why don't you call
      > > it as
      > > > > it is?
      > > > >
      > > > > K.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@>
      > > wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > In the US, we refer to our armed forces as an "all-volunteer
      > > > > > military". I was very surprised to arrive in the CR and hear the
      > > > > > Czechs say that the US had a "professional army". We don't
      > > call them
      > > > > > "professional", because in our minds the word conjures the image
      > > > > of a
      > > > > > band of hired mercenaries, rather than a national army.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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