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Re: [Czechlist] [ProZ.com Jobs] Gerald Turner saw a translation job you might like

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  • James Kirchner
    Matej, you re still misunderstanding. A translation of a Czech license is not valid in my state. The untranslated one is valid for a few months, and then
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 26, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Matej, you're still misunderstanding. A translation of a Czech
      license is not valid in my state. The untranslated one is valid for a
      few months, and then they need the translation only as part of the
      process to get a Michigan license. It's presented with the original
      license as part of the process of getting a local one.

      Anyway, have some fun watching this gymkhana practice:

      http://video.kenblockracing.com/flash/player/

      Jamie

      On Feb 26, 2009, at 8:47 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

      > I don't think this option - translated Czech license - was in place
      > in WA when I got my US license, I even had the Czech "International
      > license" (In English among other languages) at that time.... all I
      > had to do was the test (very easy compared to what we have to go
      > through here) and then drive around the block with an inspector - he
      > told me off for not putting the handbrake on and not turning my
      > wheels against the curb after parallel parking - I told him my car
      > (which we were sitting in) was a stick shift and that 1st gear left
      > engaged does the job just fine - but no probs otherwise, took about
      > 3 hours and cost about $20..
      >
      > M
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: James Kirchner
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 2:20 PM
      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] [ProZ.com Jobs] Gerald Turner saw a
      > translation job you might like
      >
      > You're seeing the point and missing it at the same time. :-) Cops
      > don't care about the translations.
      >
      > The foreigner's license is good for only about 3 months in my state,
      > so they have to apply for a local one. In order to get the local one,
      > they need a translation of their Czech one. For some countries,
      > Michigan simply issues them a driver's license with the same
      > authorizations as their foreign one. For example, Germans, and I
      > think Czechs, can just present their licenses, along with their
      > translation, to the Michigan Secretary of State clerk, take the
      > written test we all take for license renewal every three years (in any
      > language they want!), and walk out with a license. Indonesians have
      > to go through the whole process, including the road test.
      >
      > The worst situation I saw was that a for some reason a Czech woman's
      > CR license wasn't honored, and she had to drive on a learner's permit
      > for a few months. This requires that a licensed driver be present in
      > the car with her anytime she drives. She didn't know this, however,
      > and thought that the learner's permit was "temporary license" to put
      > inside her Czech license. So, she was arrested for driving alone on a
      > learner's permit. Due to confusion caused by her not knowing English,
      > and even the different order of days on American calendars, she wound
      > up being cuffed and put in jail at least three times, and had to pay
      > about $500 bond for each jail visit. When I translated in front of
      > the judge, "You have been accused of driving unaccompanied on a
      > temporary learner's permit. How do you plead?" Her eyes popped out
      > of her head. It was the first time she realized it wasn't a full
      > license.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Feb 26, 2009, at 7:04 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
      >
      > > Why on earth would people go through all this trouble with
      > > translating their driver licenses (which are not valid after certain
      > > time you reside in a foreign country anyway, plus are usually looked
      > > down at by local cops), when applying for and getting a driver's
      > > license in the US is as easy as buying toaletni papir in Czecho??
      > > (And I mean no disrespect here, it took me one afternoon and about
      > > $20 to get mine back in WA, surely all these 'translations' and
      > > other stuff must cost more and take more time?)
      > >
      > > M
      > >
      > > What's a spazzy translation, Jamie? Any relation to ahorribly un-PC
      > > word I'm thinking of?
      > >
      > > M
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: James Kirchner
      > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 12:50 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] [ProZ.com Jobs] Gerald Turner saw a
      > > translation job you might like
      > >
      > > On Feb 25, 2009, at 11:41 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
      > >
      > > > Will be one of these things you'll get for back translation one
      > day
      > > > Jamie, well-written English, but completely off the mark..
      > >
      > > No, I'll be the one doing the off-the-mark English translation. I
      > > don't work into Czech.
      > >
      > > Speaking of annoying jobs, I got one on Friday.
      > >
      > > This requires some background: The State of Michigan decided a few
      > > years ago that things were too loosey goosey with the driver's
      > license
      > > translations. Every corner grocery store owner was doing them, and
      > > sometimes the license holder was translating his own, so the
      > > translations were often incompetent, unintelligible, or downright
      > > fraudulent.
      > >
      > > The state wanted the fix the situation, so -- without checking with
      > > the Michigan ATA chapter -- they devised their own scheme of
      > > procedures and standards. These haven't improved the quality of the
      > > translations much, but they fix it so even correct translations by
      > > authorized translators get rejected, and fraudulent ones sail
      > through.
      > >
      > > I used to get calls from local Hispanic- and Russian-run translation
      > > agencies asking me to translate a Czech or Slovak driver's license.
      > > Even though I'm the only translator listed in the state who does
      > Czech
      > > (but not absolutely the only one here), and there are Czech people
      > > moving in and out of the state all the time, I never get more than
      > two
      > > such assignments from any one agency, and then it stops.
      > >
      > > I suspected that after those two assignments the agencies cut out
      > the
      > > middle man, recycle the parts of my translations, and have María
      > López
      > > or Abdullah Hussein sign the translation attesting that they are
      > > fluent in Czech and English and have done the translation
      > accurately.
      > >
      > > Once a Russian-run agency had an Armenian secretary who was an
      > > intermediate ESL student translate a German driver's license into
      > > horrible English and then call and ask me to "proofread a job and
      > sign
      > > it". As the "proofreader", I would have had to retranslate the whole
      > > mess at a quarter of the translator's rate and then sign the
      > document
      > > as the translator. I refused and told them not to play that trick on
      > > me again.
      > >
      > > Yesterday I had another one. Some cheesy-paying but reliable
      > Chaldean
      > > lady wanted me to proofread the translation of a Czech license. It
      > > was all translated spazzy, even the easy parts, but the problem came
      > > with the vehicle endorsements.
      > >
      > > By the letter symbol and picture representing 50 cc motorcycles,
      > > someone (probably the Chaldean lady) had written "bi/motorcycles".
      > By
      > > the passenger car, she wrote "motor vehicles". However those EU
      > cards
      > > show about a dozen classes of vehicles the holder could be
      > authorized
      > > to drive, or not. When I do this, I usually include the EU
      > > description of the vehicle classes endorsed (translated from
      > > Brusselese into real English), so that the state clerk will know
      > what
      > > it is.
      > >
      > > I wrote back to the lady telling her of the problem. The one picture
      > > wasn't a bicycle, and you don't need a license to ride a bike in the
      > > CR, and that all the vehicles pictured were motor vehicles, not just
      > > the car.
      > >
      > > She writes back, "We have what we have. The first picture looks like
      > > a motorcycle." I pointed out that there were three or four classes
      > of
      > > motorcycles depicted on the license, and she sent me another screwy
      > > answer.
      > >
      > > Then I wrote back and asked, "Did the person who translated this
      > > license actually know Czech, or is this someone trying to fake it?"
      > > Silence.
      > >
      > > The next day she wrote back, "By all means make the necessary
      > > changes."
      > >
      > > Forget it. She's already gotten the $15 value from me that she would
      > > have paid for.
      > >
      > > JK
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Matej Klimes
      What I meant was that it would probably be easier for them to forget about getting the translation and go through the regular process - as if they ve never had
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 26, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        What I meant was that it would probably be easier for them to forget about getting the translation and go through the regular process - as if they've never had a license, surely that must be possible..


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: James Kirchner
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 6:50 PM
        Subject: Re: [Czechlist] [ProZ.com Jobs] Gerald Turner saw a translation job you might like


        Matej, you're still misunderstanding. A translation of a Czech
        license is not valid in my state. The untranslated one is valid for a
        few months, and then they need the translation only as part of the
        process to get a Michigan license. It's presented with the original
        license as part of the process of getting a local one.

        Anyway, have some fun watching this gymkhana practice:

        http://video.kenblockracing.com/flash/player/

        Jamie

        On Feb 26, 2009, at 8:47 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

        > I don't think this option - translated Czech license - was in place
        > in WA when I got my US license, I even had the Czech "International
        > license" (In English among other languages) at that time.... all I
        > had to do was the test (very easy compared to what we have to go
        > through here) and then drive around the block with an inspector - he
        > told me off for not putting the handbrake on and not turning my
        > wheels against the curb after parallel parking - I told him my car
        > (which we were sitting in) was a stick shift and that 1st gear left
        > engaged does the job just fine - but no probs otherwise, took about
        > 3 hours and cost about $20..
        >
        > M
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: James Kirchner
        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 2:20 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] [ProZ.com Jobs] Gerald Turner saw a
        > translation job you might like
        >
        > You're seeing the point and missing it at the same time. :-) Cops
        > don't care about the translations.
        >
        > The foreigner's license is good for only about 3 months in my state,
        > so they have to apply for a local one. In order to get the local one,
        > they need a translation of their Czech one. For some countries,
        > Michigan simply issues them a driver's license with the same
        > authorizations as their foreign one. For example, Germans, and I
        > think Czechs, can just present their licenses, along with their
        > translation, to the Michigan Secretary of State clerk, take the
        > written test we all take for license renewal every three years (in any
        > language they want!), and walk out with a license. Indonesians have
        > to go through the whole process, including the road test.
        >
        > The worst situation I saw was that a for some reason a Czech woman's
        > CR license wasn't honored, and she had to drive on a learner's permit
        > for a few months. This requires that a licensed driver be present in
        > the car with her anytime she drives. She didn't know this, however,
        > and thought that the learner's permit was "temporary license" to put
        > inside her Czech license. So, she was arrested for driving alone on a
        > learner's permit. Due to confusion caused by her not knowing English,
        > and even the different order of days on American calendars, she wound
        > up being cuffed and put in jail at least three times, and had to pay
        > about $500 bond for each jail visit. When I translated in front of
        > the judge, "You have been accused of driving unaccompanied on a
        > temporary learner's permit. How do you plead?" Her eyes popped out
        > of her head. It was the first time she realized it wasn't a full
        > license.
        >
        > Jamie
        >
        > On Feb 26, 2009, at 7:04 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
        >
        > > Why on earth would people go through all this trouble with
        > > translating their driver licenses (which are not valid after certain
        > > time you reside in a foreign country anyway, plus are usually looked
        > > down at by local cops), when applying for and getting a driver's
        > > license in the US is as easy as buying toaletni papir in Czecho??
        > > (And I mean no disrespect here, it took me one afternoon and about
        > > $20 to get mine back in WA, surely all these 'translations' and
        > > other stuff must cost more and take more time?)
        > >
        > > M
        > >
        > > What's a spazzy translation, Jamie? Any relation to ahorribly un-PC
        > > word I'm thinking of?
        > >
        > > M
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: James Kirchner
        > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 12:50 PM
        > > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] [ProZ.com Jobs] Gerald Turner saw a
        > > translation job you might like
        > >
        > > On Feb 25, 2009, at 11:41 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
        > >
        > > > Will be one of these things you'll get for back translation one
        > day
        > > > Jamie, well-written English, but completely off the mark..
        > >
        > > No, I'll be the one doing the off-the-mark English translation. I
        > > don't work into Czech.
        > >
        > > Speaking of annoying jobs, I got one on Friday.
        > >
        > > This requires some background: The State of Michigan decided a few
        > > years ago that things were too loosey goosey with the driver's
        > license
        > > translations. Every corner grocery store owner was doing them, and
        > > sometimes the license holder was translating his own, so the
        > > translations were often incompetent, unintelligible, or downright
        > > fraudulent.
        > >
        > > The state wanted the fix the situation, so -- without checking with
        > > the Michigan ATA chapter -- they devised their own scheme of
        > > procedures and standards. These haven't improved the quality of the
        > > translations much, but they fix it so even correct translations by
        > > authorized translators get rejected, and fraudulent ones sail
        > through.
        > >
        > > I used to get calls from local Hispanic- and Russian-run translation
        > > agencies asking me to translate a Czech or Slovak driver's license.
        > > Even though I'm the only translator listed in the state who does
        > Czech
        > > (but not absolutely the only one here), and there are Czech people
        > > moving in and out of the state all the time, I never get more than
        > two
        > > such assignments from any one agency, and then it stops.
        > >
        > > I suspected that after those two assignments the agencies cut out
        > the
        > > middle man, recycle the parts of my translations, and have María
        > López
        > > or Abdullah Hussein sign the translation attesting that they are
        > > fluent in Czech and English and have done the translation
        > accurately.
        > >
        > > Once a Russian-run agency had an Armenian secretary who was an
        > > intermediate ESL student translate a German driver's license into
        > > horrible English and then call and ask me to "proofread a job and
        > sign
        > > it". As the "proofreader", I would have had to retranslate the whole
        > > mess at a quarter of the translator's rate and then sign the
        > document
        > > as the translator. I refused and told them not to play that trick on
        > > me again.
        > >
        > > Yesterday I had another one. Some cheesy-paying but reliable
        > Chaldean
        > > lady wanted me to proofread the translation of a Czech license. It
        > > was all translated spazzy, even the easy parts, but the problem came
        > > with the vehicle endorsements.
        > >
        > > By the letter symbol and picture representing 50 cc motorcycles,
        > > someone (probably the Chaldean lady) had written "bi/motorcycles".
        > By
        > > the passenger car, she wrote "motor vehicles". However those EU
        > cards
        > > show about a dozen classes of vehicles the holder could be
        > authorized
        > > to drive, or not. When I do this, I usually include the EU
        > > description of the vehicle classes endorsed (translated from
        > > Brusselese into real English), so that the state clerk will know
        > what
        > > it is.
        > >
        > > I wrote back to the lady telling her of the problem. The one picture
        > > wasn't a bicycle, and you don't need a license to ride a bike in the
        > > CR, and that all the vehicles pictured were motor vehicles, not just
        > > the car.
        > >
        > > She writes back, "We have what we have. The first picture looks like
        > > a motorcycle." I pointed out that there were three or four classes
        > of
        > > motorcycles depicted on the license, and she sent me another screwy
        > > answer.
        > >
        > > Then I wrote back and asked, "Did the person who translated this
        > > license actually know Czech, or is this someone trying to fake it?"
        > > Silence.
        > >
        > > The next day she wrote back, "By all means make the necessary
        > > changes."
        > >
        > > Forget it. She's already gotten the $15 value from me that she would
        > > have paid for.
        > >
        > > JK
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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